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You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)
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July 2016: Biography Memoir > You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day -- 3 stars

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Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7784 comments You're Never Weird on the Internet by Felicia Day
3.5 stars (round up to 4)

I had no idea who Felicia Day was before reading this book. At least by name. Chalk that up to a lack of pre-reading research on my part. But, when Joss Whedon started narrating the introduction and I realized that Felicia Day played Penny on Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along-Blog, I instantly liked this book. Because I love Whedon. A LOT. And if Whedon loves Day, then I love Day. And I also love anyone who has ever been close enough to just make eye contact with Nathan Fillion (everyone sigh it with me: ah, Firefly.)

Felicia Day narrates her memoir and her reading is a bubbly, energetic, and spastic as she is. She describes her childhood being homeschooled by a mom who was really more interested in going out to lunch every day, having only her brother as a friend, and being impacted by gaming on the internet. Day fell into gaming when it was really taking off as a "group activity" and then built her career on it.

I have heard of her show (The Guild) and her website (Geek & Sundry) but have not watched/visited either because they are really geared toward gamers...though I am tempted to check out her show after reading her book.

What I liked most about her book is her discussion of being a woman in the man's gaming world. About working hard for what she wanted even when that meant making The Guild on a shoestring budget and filming in her own home. She was funny, and entertaining, and inspiring.

And then....

She dove into her battle with depression and anxiety. Now, let me start by saying that I have tons of sympathy for those facing mental health challenges. And, I think she is brave for opening up on such a platform and talking about it.

But....

What is it with so many memoirs by famous women talking about their battle with mental health problems? The scientist in me wants to know if there is a causal relationship, while the reader in me doesn't relate and reading about it kind of drags the book down.

And, it is not that you cannot talk about mental health or I don't see the value in reading about it, but the last few memoirs I have read that have this aspect, seem to kind of throw it in toward the end and it isn't a smooth transition. Maybe that is the point? Maybe the author wants us to feel like it is abrupt and disruptive like she did?

It just didn't work for me. And, it seemed like she was really trying to make a point about Gamer Gate, which I have no idea what it is even though it seems to have been a big deal in her life and the gaming world. She lost me on that one.

Regardless of the last few chapters, I was highly entertained by the book as a whole, enjoyed her unique career in a field traditionally dominated by men, and, you know, Joss Whedon.


message 2: by Ladyslott (new)

Ladyslott | 1880 comments Nicole wrote: "And I also love anyone who has ever been close enough to just make eye contact with Nathan Fillion (everyone sigh it with me: ah, Firefly.)..."

Rachel (my daughter who moved to LA) met Nathan Fillion last month. There is a picture to prove it. She said he was a very nice guy, very low key.


message 3: by Joi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Joi (missjoious) | 3831 comments I'm familiar with Felicia Day through Dr. Horrible, didn't know she had such a big hand in Geek and Sundry- always thought that was Wil Wheaton's thing? I guess that proves the female gamers being hidden thing. I have no idea what Gamer Gate is.... I doubt that portion of the book would interest me either.

Anyways, as long as celebrities keep writing memoirs, I will keep reading them.


message 4: by Nicole R (last edited Jul 25, 2016 11:23AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7784 comments Joi wrote: "didn't know she had such a big hand in Geek and Sundry- always thought that was Wil Wheaton's thing? ..."

Day and two other women actually started Geek & Sundry, but I know Wheaton has been involved (he was also in The Guild, I believe). Day sold it to Legendary a few years ago but remains involved.


message 5: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 6273 comments I feel so completely out of this world that I think I stumbled upon a thread written in Chinese ... or Klingon ...


message 6: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6671 comments Book Concierge wrote: "I feel so completely out of this world that I think I stumbled upon a thread written in Chinese ... or Klingon ..."

Right there with you, BC, and I feel like usually I am on top of pop culture stuff. I read Us Magazine for goodness sake.


message 7: by Sara (last edited Jul 28, 2016 06:13PM) (new)

Sara (mootastic1) | 770 comments Not familiar with The Guild or Geek and Sundry, but I have read about Gamer Gate. It basically deals with the rampant sexism and misogyny so present throughout the industry that prominent female gamers had to go into hiding due to serious threats on their lives and violent sexual assault to the only slightly less awful slut shaming and expressions that it would be good if these women committed suicide. These same people claim it wasn't about misogyny at all but instead something to do with corruption in gaming journalism.

If you want to read more, this is a good intro, though it doesn't go nearly as in depth as is required to understand everything.


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