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Matt Fulton
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TARGET DECK > MATT FULTON: Activating Active Measures

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message 1: by Matt (new)

Matt Fulton (mattfultonauthor) | 167 comments Edit: Moved this from a different section after getting acquainted with the page.

Hey, everybody! I'm new to Goodreads and this group looked like an awesome place to start.

My name's Matt Fulton. I'm just a kid from New Jersey with a laptop and a caffeine addiction. I've been an avid reader in the genre since I first picked up Clancy's The Sum of All Fears back when I was twelve.

About two weeks ago I self-published my debut novel, Active Measures: Part I. It's the first volume of a trilogy. The full plot doesn't lend itself to a quick, succinct description, but it's essentially about a faction inside the Kremlin who hire a disaffected Hezbollah operative to start a war between the US and Iran. I'll leave it there.

You can find out more on my website, http://www.mattfulton.net, or on Amazon at http://amzn.to/29IT5HW. I'm also on Twitter at @FultonMatt.

Anyway, I'm pretty excited to get in on the conversation here. I'm always looking for a great read in the genre.

Cheers!


message 2: by Bodo (new)

Bodo Pfündl | 208 comments Matt wrote: "Edit: Moved this from a different section after getting acquainted with the page.

Hey, everybody! I'm new to Goodreads and this group looked like an awesome place to start.

My name's Matt Fulton...."


Active Measures Part I (Active Measures Trilogy, #1) by Matt Fulton

Well that kid not only wrote the most complex thriller I’ve ever read but also one of the very best!

I’m about half way through and can’t recommend it high enough! Think of the epic, decade-spanning narrative of “I am Pilgrim” combined with the in-depth research of the late Tom Clancy.

I’m not exaggerating, everyone who not even reads the sample is seriously cheating oneself!


message 3: by Samuel , Director (last edited Jul 19, 2016 02:31PM) (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Matt wrote: "Edit: Moved this from a different section after getting acquainted with the page.

Hey, everybody! I'm new to Goodreads and this group looked like an awesome place to start.

My name's Matt Fulton...."


Welcome Matt,
Your book sounds very interesting. I love a good story set around a false flag plot and your book sounds like the ticket.
Feel free to explore this groups other threads. I'm sure you'll enjoy it here.

(Good title for your book by the way. "Active Measure" the old soviet term for black operations)


message 4: by Matt (new)

Matt Fulton (mattfultonauthor) | 167 comments Thanks, Samuel! I've been looking around and the group looks awesome.

This book took me about fourteen years to write from inception. There's over 200 named characters spread out across the Middle East, Russia, Europe and the US, but the bulk of the story follows four major plot lines, each with their own varying subplots.

Part I of the trilogy (which Bodo's reading now) clocks in at 280,000 words. I just started working on Part II, but I'm guessing that SOB will be around 400k.

Anyway, I invite you guys to check it out!


message 5: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Active Measures Part I (Active Measures Trilogy #1) by Matt Fulton
Peter Nealen

Shout Out to the brilliant Peter Nealen for helping me get into the head of David Kazaroff, the charismatic and nightmarish agent provocateur in Active Measures. Dave takes a lot of lovecraft tropes and applies them to spy/geopolitical fiction. The result has to be seen to be believed.

https://americanpraetorians.wordpress...


message 6: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Converting this to the thread discussing Matt's work and advertising all things Active Measures ;) Book deals and what not may be found here.


message 7: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
David Kazaroff when he's not being Russia's Oliver North also moonlights as a philosophy lecturer. His lectures never seem to get high attendance however, due to the audience moving onto a better place upon their conclusion.

However, someone suggested a possibility of a potential new audience for Dave's philosophy 101 class......#MagicTrick


message 8: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Samuel wrote: "David Kazaroff when he's not being Russia's Oliver North also moonlights as a philosophy lecturer. His lectures never seem to get high attendance however, due to the audience moving onto a better p..."

What's the difference between whistleblowers and leakers? The difference won't matter once Dave comes by.....


message 9: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Hmmm. Mr Fulton has just teased an interesting location.

The Dr Strangelove war room.

https://twitter.com/FultonMatt/status...


message 10: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Group member Matt Fulton has made a blog and posted chapters of his first book on it! He'll post chapters of his second book on it when he's ready.
https://medium.com/@FultonMatt


message 11: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Samuel wrote: "Group member Matt Fulton has made a blog and posted chapters of his first book on it! He'll post chapters of his second book on it when he's ready.
https://medium.com/@FultonMatt"


Has anyone read the chapters? Please do so! This is the opening of the most ambitious geopolitical thriller in 20 years!


message 12: by Bodo (new)

Bodo Pfündl | 208 comments 100% agreed Samuel!


message 13: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
yeah. Second book also starts with a pretty impressive narrative hook.


message 14: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Theme song of Active Measures. Listen to the lyrics and you'll know why it's so suitable.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXD3V...


message 15: by Samuel , Director (last edited Jan 25, 2018 02:37PM) (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
INTERVIEW WITH MATT FULTON:

How did you do all the research for this book? How did you learn about all the technical details of weaponry and foreign policy?

By reading lots of books and spending a lot—and I mean a lot—of time surfing Google. I have no real background in the subject matter, I’m not a veteran or a retired intelligence officer, so every detail you read in Active Measures: Part I, be it the architecture of an English country estate or how a truck bomb is built, was all cobbled together from open source information. My method has largely stayed the same in researching and writing Part II of the trilogy. That said, having Part I out has afforded me the ability to get in touch with certain experts and say, “Hey, look, I’m this real person who wrote this book. Can I ask you a couple questions for the sequel?” I’ve met some incredibly interesting people over the past year or so and they’ve been nothing but helpful and generous with their time.

What do you think of the Russian plotline now that Russia is back in the news?

Well, I certainly wish it wasn’t in the news! That’s the difference between fiction and reality. When I go into my office and write this admittedly terrifying stuff, none of it’s actually affecting real people out in the world; it’s not a danger looming over our shoulder every day. I chose Active Measures as a title about eleven years ago as I was sitting in my high school’s library when the world looked incredibly different. Part of me appreciates that “active measures” is now a household term and is spoken on cable news easily dozens of times a day. That’s kinda cool. Unfortunately, the consequences of this whole strange odyssey—however it ultimately ends—will haunt us for decades whether we like it or not, and that’s just not worth the free publicity.

Without straying too far into spoiler territory, what’s happening in Washington today is kind of a strange mirror image of what will happen with the Russia plotline over the remainder of the Active Measures trilogy. It’s been odd to see that develop.

What was your writing process? What kept you going through 650 pages?

What kept me going through 650 pages was not knowing that I had to go through 650 pages. There were five major drafts of Part I written over a span of about six years, and they all vary widely in length. As I was working through the final draft, following a loose outline in my head, I had no real comprehension of just how large the manuscript would become. I had a story to tell, there was a climax in mind (the whole Paris debacle), and I knew that whenever I got there the book would be done. It just took me a lot longer to get there than I ever anticipated. So, there was never a moment when I stopped at, say, page 300 and thought, “My god, I’m only halfway!” Does that make sense? If that weren’t the case, I probably would’ve become entirely overwhelmed by the scale of this thing and given up out of pure terror. I’m actually dealing with that problem now with Part II!

What do you admire in a solid action and suspense novel?

This is a really subjective issue and I’m sure many people will disagree with me and that’s fine, but what I appreciate in an “action and suspense” novel is when that action is earned through plot and character development. I dislike the idea of trying to meet some imaginary quota that an author in this genre has to blow shit up every ten pages because apparently that’s the only way for a thriller to advance the plot. It’s not. However, when an author does blow shit up—and this author enjoys doing so just as much as the next guy—do it as well and as realistically as possible. The stakes of that action will be so much greater if we truly care about the characters thrust into the middle of it, if they’re three-dimensional human beings who (gasp) may in fact actually fail and not “superheroes” wantonly massacring cardboard terrorists.

More broadly, I appreciate stories in the genre that attempt to tackle difficult geopolitical and personal conflicts with nuance and subtlety, not merely reinforcing a reader’s preconceived notion of a particular region or issue. I believe that does a grave disserve to the audience. Our readers are intelligent, thoughtful people. They are capable of processing complex, heady subjects. We should write more stories that trust them to do just that.

Would you ever go back to working in government or international relations or do you plan to stick with writing?



I’m a writer. It’s all I want to do and unfortunately doing anything else would just suck the life out of me. I have this existential crisis whenever I get the opportunity to go back to DC and work in that world. It’s just not for me. I need to tell stories. So, I’ll keep writing—and not limited to the spy genre! I have a bunch of ideas for screenplays I’d like to develop in the future. They’re staying close to the vest for now, and I’ve no idea if they’ll ever see the light of day, but I certainly hope so… I’m young. There’s still plenty of time.


message 16: by Samuel , Director (new)

Samuel  | 4692 comments Mod
Matt wrote: "Edit: Moved this from a different section after getting acquainted with the page.

Hey, everybody! I'm new to Goodreads and this group looked like an awesome place to start.

My name's Matt Fulton...."


Status Report....Getting There.

https://t.co/L1wJ7ynbbm


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