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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments 23 books Mark Zuckerberg thinks everyone should read

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a single mission: to connect people around the world.

It's one reason why he decided to launch a Facebook-based book club last year, with a reading list that focused on "different cultures, beliefs, histories, and technologies."

Although the birth of his daughter, Max, kept him from hitting his goal of a book every two weeks, he ended the year with 23 selections in his A Year of Books reading group.

We've put together a list of his picks and why he thinks everyone should read them:

The Muqaddimah' by Ibn Khaldun
'The Muqaddimah' by Ibn Khaldun
Amazon

"The Muqaddimah," which translates to "The Introduction," was written in 1377 by the Islamic historian Khaldun. It's an attempt to strip away biases of historical records and find universal elements in the progression of humanity.

Khaldun's revolutionary scientific approach to history established him as one of the fathers of modern sociology and historiography.

"While much of what was believed then is now disproven after 700 more years of progress, it's still very interesting to see what was understood at this time and the overall worldview when it's all considered together," Zuckerberg writes.
Find it here »
'The New Jim Crow' by Michelle Alexander
'The New Jim Crow' by Michelle Alexander
Amazon

Alexander is a law professor at Ohio State University and a civil-rights advocate who argues in her book that the "war on drugs" has fostered a culture in which nonviolent black males are overrepresented in prison, and then are treated as second-class citizens once they are freed.

"I've been interested in learning about criminal justice reform for a while, and this book was highly recommended by several people I trust," Zuckerberg writes.

Why Nations Fail' by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
'Why Nations Fail' by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
Amazon

"Why Nations Fail" is an overview of 15 years of research by MIT economist Daren Acemoglu and Harvard political scientist James Robinson, and was first published in 2012.

The authors argue that "extractive governments" use controls to enforce the power of a select few, while "inclusive governments" create open markets that allow citizens to spend and invest money freely, and that economic growth does not always indicate the long-term health of a country.

Zuckerberg's interest in philanthropy has grown alongside his wealth in recent years, and he writes that he chose this book to better understand the origins of global poverty.

'The Rational Optimist' by Matt Ridley
'The Rational Optimist' by Matt Ridley
Amazon

"The Rational Optimist," first published in 2010, is the most popular and perhaps the most controversial of popular-science writer Matt Ridley's books.

In it, he argues that the concept of markets is the source of human progress, and that progress is accelerated when they are kept as free as possible. The resulting evolution of ideas will consistently allow humankind to improve its living conditions, despite the threats of climate change and overpopulation.

Zuckerberg says that he picked up this book because it posits the inverse theory of "Why Nations Fail," which argues that social and political forces control economic ones.

"I'm interested to see which idea resonates more after exploring both frameworks," Zuckerberg writes.

Portfolios of the Poor' by Daryl Collins, Jonathan Morduch, Stuart Rutherford, and Orlanda Ruthven
'Portfolios of the Poor' by Daryl Collins, Jonathan Morduch, Stuart Rutherford, and Orlanda Ruthven
Amazon

Researchers Daryl Collins, Jonathan Morduch, Stuart Rutherford, and Orlanda Ruthven spent 10 years studying the financial lives of the lowest classes of Bangladesh, India, and South Africa.

A fundamental finding that they include in "Portfolios of the Poor" is that extreme poverty flourishes in areas not where people live dollar to dollar or where poor purchasing decisions are widespread, but instead arises where they lack access to financial institutions to store their money.

"It's mind-blowing that almost half the world — almost 3 billion people — live on $2.50 a day or less. More than one billion people live on $1 a day or less," Zuckerberg writes. "I hope reading this provides some insight into ways we can all work to support them better as well."
Find it here »
'World Order' by Henry Kissinger
'World Order' by Henry Kissinger
Amazon

In former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's 2014 book, "World Order," the 91-year-old analyzes the ways different parts of the world have understood the concept of empire and political power for centuries, and how the modern global economy has brought them together in often tense or violent ways.

It's "about foreign relations and how we can build peaceful relationships throughout the world," Zuckerberg writes. "This is important for creating the world we all want for our children, and that's what I'm thinking about these days."

'The Varieties of Religious Experience' by William James
'The Varieties of Religious Experience' by William James
Amazon

William James (1849-1919) is "considered by many to be the most insightful and stimulating of American philosophers," according to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy from the University of Tennessee.

"The Varieties of Religious Experience" is a collection of written lectures that explore the religious consciousness and the mechanics of how people use religion as a source of meaning, compelling them to move onward through life with energy and purpose.

"When I read 'Sapiens,' I found the chapter on the evolution of the role of religion in human life most interesting and something I wanted to go deeper on," Zuckerberg writes.

Continued:


message 2: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2766 comments Admirable list...but heavy lifting.


message 3: by Alias Reader (last edited Jun 03, 2016 03:27PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments Ack ! I started to post the Zuckerber list but saw that it would need multiple posting and editing. I didn't have the time to work on it as I was headed out the door for a spin class. I thought I erased the post. I intended to post it later tonight. ANYway, here is the link with the list.

23 books Mark Zuckerberg thinks everyone should read
http://www.businessinsider.com/mark-z...

Just the other day I put one of the books on my TBR list.
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Another I own but haven't read it yet. A friend borrowed it but I haven't gotten it back yet.
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters
sounds interesting. I have to check it out and see how accessible it is to someone not well versed with the topic.


message 4: by Amy (new)

Amy (amybf) | 514 comments I immediately tune out when anyone--I don't care who it is--tells me about books I "should" read. At my age, I've come to the stark realization that there isn't enough time left to read everything I WANT to read, much less make my way through a list of books that some random person tells me I SHOULD read.


message 5: by Michele (new)

Michele Weiner | 161 comments I am impressed by what Zuckerman is reading--I have read two of these and they were hard going. I am going to check out the lighter side with The Three Body Problem and The Player of Games. Thanks for the list.


message 6: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments Amy, I find the lists a great way to find out about books that I may have missed. It's especially useful if the person and I have similar reading tastes.

This list was part of Zuckerberg's list of books he read while trying to reach his personal goal of reading a book a week.


message 7: by Amy (new)

Amy (amybf) | 514 comments Perhaps it's the way the article is worded. I'd have less of a negative reaction if it said, "books that Mark Zuckerberg recommends." Or "books that Mark Zuckerberg read during his personal challenge to complete a book a week."


message 8: by Petra (last edited Jun 04, 2016 09:24AM) (new)

Petra | 1004 comments That's an interesting and heavy list.

A couple of them are already on my radar: On Immunity: An Inoculation and Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters (I enjoy books on genetics).

I had taken The Three-Body Problem out of the library but brought it back because it was so popular at the time and I wouldn't have had the time to complete it. One day I'll request it again.

I found a copy of The Varieties of Religious Experience for $1, so I ordered that. I enjoy books on theology if they don't preach doctrine.

I've added Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind and The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined on my library "later" shelf. I enjoy books on both our human past and of human nature.

Like Alias, I look at these lists as bringing books to my attention that I may otherwise have missed. I don't take it personally that I "must" read them.
The books I listed, had I found them through another method, would have caught my interest anyway. Will I read them? Maybe, maybe not but they're on my various TBR lists for "just in case", otherwise I'll forget the titles.


message 9: by madrano (new)

madrano | 10197 comments Amy wrote: "Perhaps it's the way the article is worded. I'd have less of a negative reaction if it said, "books that Mark Zuckerberg recommends." Or "books that Mark Zuckerberg read during his personal challenge to complete a book a week."..."

Amy, my husband feels that way about articles with "should", "must" and similar terms which lead him to feel as if he's being ordered to do something. I can see him blanch every time a friend says that. I tend to see it as a strong recommendation, rather than an order, but i can see the problem. Words! :-)


message 10: by Michele (new)

Michele Weiner | 161 comments Well, I'm reading The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu, which was on the Zuckerberg Compulsory Reading List, and I am loving it thus far. Superb science mystery. Physicists are committing suicide right and left. The Chinese military is cooperating with the CIA; there is a war on but nobody knows it. Can't wait to read the rest. Thanks, Zuckerberg!


message 11: by madrano (last edited Jun 13, 2016 01:52PM) (new)

madrano | 10197 comments Sounds neat, Michele. I didn't add any of his books to my TBR but will now! Thanks.The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin.


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments Glad you are enjoying it, Michele !


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2766 comments madrano wrote: "Sounds neat, Michele. I didn't add any of his books to my TBR but will now! Thanks.The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin."

I'm going to try to get this from the library. It sounds good.


message 14: by thewanderingjew (new)

thewanderingjew | 138 comments Amy wrote: "I immediately tune out when anyone--I don't care who it is--tells me about books I "should" read. At my age, I've come to the stark realization that there isn't enough time left to read everything ..."

i just wonder why anyone truly cares what he reads or has read...he is a lucky, smart, rich man who has made a lot of money in a capitalist society that he would probably rate negatively because of his progressive views. yet it is that society that has propelled him to the heights and wealth he enjoys!


message 15: by Alias Reader (last edited Jun 15, 2016 10:19AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments I don't want to get into politics here. I'll just say I like to post reading lists. For those that find them fun, like I do, cool. For those that don't, that's fine, too.

I like book lists, from a variety of sources, for a few reasons. One, it may give me insight into the person. Two, I may find a book that I didn't know about. Three, if a person is successful, in whatever field, be it exercise to business and all things in between, they may have tips that I would help me.

I've posted lists from scientists, business people, celebs, etc. I also posted lists from book companies like Modern Library. I enjoy them all. :) The only problem I have with these lists is my already mountainous TBR list grows more !


message 16: by thewanderingjew (last edited Jun 15, 2016 11:51AM) (new)

thewanderingjew | 138 comments If you don't want it to be about politics, perhaps you should also post a list of books that a conservative promotes. I don't know of any, but I am sure there are some who are well known, who read. The list would probably feel a bit more even handed, in that way.


message 17: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 2766 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I don't want to get into politics here. I'll just say I like to post reading lists. For those that find them fun, like I do, cool. For those that don't, that's fine, too.

I like book lists, from a..."


I like your book lists Alias. I've found several books on them that I've requested from the library.


message 18: by thewanderingjew (new)

thewanderingjew | 138 comments My comment was not meant to say that I didn't care for the book lists, but merely to indicate that if you choose to feature someone so far left, it wouldn't hurt to also feature someone far right or in the middle, etc.


message 19: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments I have zero idea what the politics of the CEO of Facebook are. I found the list of book intriguing and think they cover a range of interesting topics. I was on Facebook and saw the list and posted it as I do with other book lists and recommendations.

I'll continue to post book lists that I find interesting. As I stated we also have a folder for book lists. You will even find a list of books from Marilyn Monroe ! I also post lists of books on topics from travel, bios & mysteries.

I think you are seeing problems where non exist.


message 20: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments Barbara wrote: "I like your book lists Alias. I've found several books on them that I've requested from the library. "

I appreciate the support !


message 21: by thewanderingjew (new)

thewanderingjew | 138 comments You know you began this by making the comment about my post. You decided it was political. It was not intended that way, nor was it my intention to start a brouhaha. I merely voiced an opinion. For some reason, it seems to have offended you.
Facebook and Zuckerberg were in the news of late because of their "questionable" practice of posting which seemed to be favoring liberal candidates. That was the frame of reference for my post. I assumed most of the posters had followed current events and would be aware of that and understand my point.
However, regardless of all that, free speech is something we should all respect without trying to cast aspersions on those who might disagree with us. Please feel free to post whatever you like. I just wish you had allowed me the same privilege without jumping to your own conclusions about my intentions.
I am happy your followers support you, but I wasn't aware of the fact that this was a topic with a need for taking sides! Do you not welcome "strangers"?


message 22: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17626 comments Sorry, I am not going to engage further. I tried to explain but you seem bent on confrontation. That is not what this board is about.


message 23: by madrano (new)

madrano | 10197 comments It seems to me that if anyone else wants to link or share a list they could email Alias and do so. I don't know how to even locate such lists, so I'm grateful for them. They are just fun to me.


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