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Extra Stuff > Help! What does that mean in English??????!!

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message 1: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Do you ever a read a book where the author throws in a few lines from another language here and there but doesn't really explain what's meant (ie translate) thinking that everyone's a linguist or a polyglot? This sort of thing bugs me so I thought why not start a thread where you can write what was said and maybe someone who speaks the language can help you out:

I was reading Roxanne St Claire's Kill Me Twice and the hero spoke Spanish. Does anyone know what these words mean:

Despacio
Despiértate (does it mean "wake up"?)
Kill Me Twice (Bullet Catcher, #1) by Roxanne St. Claire


message 2: by Kathrynn (last edited Mar 08, 2009 06:08AM) (new)

Kathrynn Despacio: slowly

Despiértate: wake up or arouse

No hablo espanol, East? :-)


message 3: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Thanks Kathrynn :D Nope, I only took a year of Beginner's Spanish at university so what I do know is limited to tourist lingo and some irregular verb conjugation (lol!) 8-)


message 4: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments I think you need to be watching some "Dora the Explorer"!:D Then you'd get your Spanish lesson!:)


message 5: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
LOL! Where I am Auntee Dora speaks French and teaches English (lol!)


message 6: by Stamatia (new)

Stamatia | 10 comments Here too only it's Greek instead of French


message 7: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Darn that Dora gets around!:)


message 8: by Kathrynn (new)

Kathrynn In Texas, we are becoming northern Mexico...We have all Spanish commercials once in awhile now and some businesses are all in Spanish.

Almost everywhere there are Spanish/English signs...




message 9: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
LOL Stamatia --Dora is surely a world traveller ;)

That's cool Kathrynn to have the double commercials. Great way to teach a language.


message 10: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Spanish is definitely taking over in the US. A lot of the signs (especially in WalMart--have you noticed?) are in English and Spanish.

And East, most anything that comes with printed directions is in English, Spanish, and French.:)


message 11: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Auntee, here most printed directions arrive in English and Chinese!! No one speaks Chinese here though 8-)


message 12: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Good one! I'm sure that really helps!:D


message 13: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Okay, I came across this phrase today. The hero is a Cajun and of course speaks French. I'm pretty sure I know what this means, I just want some confirmation--"fils de pute"? Swear word, right?


message 14: by Miss Kim (last edited Mar 11, 2009 12:39PM) (new)

Miss Kim (thatsmisskimtoyou) My highschool french is rusty, but i think "fils" means child. I'm sure East knows for sure. LOL. Just wanted to see if I was close. 'son of a bitch'?


message 15: by jenjn79 (new)

jenjn79 | 104 comments According to my Firefox translate extension, Auntee, it means "son of bitch"...I knew the first two words, but not the third, though I could guess (they didn't teach those words in my high school and college french ;)...fils is masculine and means son (fille is the feminine and means daughter), de = of, and pute = bitch.


message 16: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments That's what I thought.:) I was pretty sure about "fils", but had never heard of "pute". lol!
"Pute" sounds like a swear word anyhow!

East??


message 17: by new_user (new)

new_user Son of a whore or whoreson, literally. The equivalent today would probably be "son of a bitch," though that has somewhat less force since it's become more of an expression and less of a personal insult on one's parentage.

Hope that helps, Auntee. :)


message 18: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Oh yeah, new_user, that helps! Thanks!:)


message 19: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
"Son of bitch" it is in modern French otherwise like new-user said especially if you're reading a historical. Look at the things were learning at GR--perfect cocktail conversation ;D


message 20: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Thanks East. Hope to have more swear words for you to translate.:) With the book I'm reading it's very possible!:)


message 21: by Kathrynn (new)

Kathrynn LOL, East!


message 22: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
LOL! ;)


message 23: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Hey you Gaelic speakers (!) anyone know what "Uist" translates into English? I'm thinking it's like "Damn" or something??


message 24: by jenjn79 (new)

jenjn79 | 104 comments Google Translate doesn't give me anything for that word and searching Google just told me that it is a group of islands in the Outer Hebrides.


message 25: by new_user (new)

new_user Checking an online Gaelic dictionary for "uist" returned me this, East: "Hist! Silence!" Hope that helps. :)


message 26: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Ah, so it's today's "SHUT UP!" or a strong "SHHH!" I see ;) That works. Thanks NU ;)

Don't you love when you get those kinds of translations Isis (lol!)


message 27: by jenjn79 (new)

jenjn79 | 104 comments Eastofoz wrote: "Don't you love when you get those kinds of translations Isis (lol!)"

East, I just started Skye's To Catch A Thief and there was a mention of Uist...but this time it was the Islands. How weird is that?


message 28: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
LOL! What are the oddds (!!)


message 29: by jenjn79 (new)

jenjn79 | 104 comments I know! What a weird coincidence.

I wouldn't have known what they were referring to either, if you hadn't asked about it.


message 30: by Dina (new)

Dina (missdina) | 170 comments Does anyone know what "Haud yer wheesht!" means? I think it´s Gaelic but I´m not sure. Based on the context of the scene where I read these words, I´m guessing something like a less-than-polite "Wait a minute!" but it would be nice to know for sure.


message 31: by new_user (last edited Apr 03, 2009 03:11PM) (new)

new_user LOL, Dina, "Haud yer wheesht!" apparently also means "shut up." Who knew there were so many different ways to say it? LOL. "Wheesht" is like "shush," sound and meaning.

Wow, I'm learning stuff. I love this, LOL.


message 32: by Dina (new)

Dina (missdina) | 170 comments LMAO, it looks like those Gaelic warriors like everyone "nice and quiet".


message 33: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
What exactly is a "Cyprian's Ball" (historical romance) and why is it called "Cyprian"???


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 39 comments A cyprian's ball is an event where gentlemen go to meet lightskirts (prostitutes, courtesans).


message 35: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Thanks Danielle. Now does anyone know why "Cyprian" is used? Makes me think of Cyprus or something (lol!) Maybe Stamatia knows, she's in Greece :)


message 36: by new_user (new)

new_user Cyprian is used because there used to be a sect dedicated to Aphrodite on Cyprus. ;)


message 37: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Aha! I knew there was a Greek link somewhere! Thanks NU :D


message 38: by Adrienne (new)

Adrienne its always made me think of a colour::blue::cyprian blue:: bright like mediteranean sky::sounds lovely::i have an old dictionary::and the only explanation is::*resident of cyprus*::obviuosly too prudish to add any other meaning ha ha ::


message 39: by new_user (new)

new_user LOL. No prob, good intuition. ;)


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 39 comments new_user wrote: "Cyprian is used because there used to be a sect dedicated to Aphrodite on Cyprus. ;)"

You go, New User!




 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 39 comments Adrienne wrote: "its always made me think of a colour::blue::cyprian blue:: bright like mediteranean sky::sounds lovely::i have an old dictionary::and the only explanation is::*resident of cyprus*::obviuosly too pr..."


Yeah, maybe so. :)



message 42: by Kayleigh (new)

Kayleigh (kayleighjamison) | 2 comments Remember, in polite society at the time (mostly the beau monde) it was all about saying something without saying it. (Hear no evil, see no evil).

Cyprians were generally courtesans (the demi monde), not your run of the mill prostitutes, or light skirts.


message 43: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Anyone speak any Spanish? The book I'm reading now has a love scene where the hero is speaking Spanish to the heroine, and I've been able to translate most of it except for one phrase: "Tomalo. Tomalo todo."
I have a pretty good idea of what he's saying, but I'm not 100% sure. Any ideas?


message 44: by new_user (new)

new_user That means "take it all," Auntee. LOL. Hot, hot. Don't tell me that's in the Victoria Dahl book? I may have to give her a look-see after all, LOL. ;)


message 45: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Thanks new-user! Oh yeah, you guessed it, that's from Start Me Up. Verry hot book with all those Spanish phrases.:D


message 46: by Auntee (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Anne wrote: " "Tomalo. Tomalo todo."i>

Yeah that's hot. Unless he's feeding her spinach!"


LOL!!!


message 47: by Lu (new)

Lu If anyone needs anything translated from "Afrikaans", give me a shout :)


message 48: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz | 666 comments Mod
Thanks Lu :)


message 49: by Ladiibbug (new)

Ladiibbug Anyone know what a "Corinthian" is? It's not a foreign(non-English) word, but I've seen it lately and have no clue. Thanks!


message 50: by Auntee (last edited Jul 15, 2009 07:23AM) (new)

Auntee | 494 comments Ladiibbug wrote: "Anyone know what a "Corinthian" is? It's not a foreign(non-English) word, but I've seen it lately and have no clue. Thanks!"

Brings to mind that old TV commercial with Ricardo Montalban(sp?), "...rich Corinthian leather...":)

Actually, the definition you may be looking for is--"a lover of elegantly luxurious living; sybarite", or, "a wealthy man about town", or "a wealthy devotee of amateur sports; or, "a yachtsman".
Or it may refer to a type of architecture.
Do any of those fit?


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