Nordic Noir discussion

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General > Currently Reading - 2013 version

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message 1: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments New Year, New currently reading thread...

how is everyone starting off 2013?


message 2: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE!!!

Why reading of course!!


message 3: by Anna, the Enabler (new)

Anna (aetm) | 192 comments But of course :)
And the next 5-10 books are kind of queued already.
Happy new year y'all where ever anyone happens to be... I think it's next year already in Australia. And in 16 minutes by Jim...


message 4: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy Megraw (jmegraw) | 29 comments There is a Nordic Noir reading list at NYPL, complete with series running order and audio pronunciation of the authors, two things I've always found hard to find in one place!


message 5: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Thanks, Jeremy! That's cool...not to mention I found a new author!


message 6: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments who is new to you N?


message 7: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Karin Alvtegen...I don't think I have read anything by her before.


message 8: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments really - I thought you had - hmmm, potential author of the month


message 9: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Oh, whoopsie..they start to all run together.


message 10: by James (new)

James Thompson (jamesthompson) | 228 comments There is a Finnish pronunciation of Inspector Vaara series names, words and phrases on my site. If you're interested: http://jamesthompsonauthor.com/site/m...


message 11: by Jenny (new)

Jenny (jennyil) | 20 comments I read the second Nina Borg book, Invisible Murder. I can't warm up to Nina, but the plots are interesting.


message 12: by Pat (new)

Pat (6-paq) | 2 comments I'm reading Don't Look Back by Karin Fossum, first in the Inspector Sejer series.


message 13: by Brad (new)

Brad | 15 comments In the Darkness is the first of the Inspector Sejer series, though it's not on Goodreads for some reason. I just purchased it on Amazon.

So far this year I've finished Between Summer's Longing and Winter's End: The Story of a Crime, The Bat (Jo Nesbo), Silence of the Grave, Missing, Mind's Eye, and Sidetracked.

I've had a lot of time to waste on planes. Just started Lime's Photograph, but will probably take longer on that one.


message 14: by Anna, the Enabler (new)

Anna (aetm) | 192 comments Just finished Jan Costin Wagner's Silence, and now I need something with more adrenaline... :)


message 15: by Pat (new)

Pat (6-paq) | 2 comments Thanks Brad for the tip on the Inspector Sejer series. I'll look for In the Darkness.


message 16: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments I'm seeing In The Darkness on Amazon but not readily available in the US - looks like it has to come through a 3rd party seller


message 17: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Dee wrote: "I'm seeing In The Darkness on Amazon but not readily available in the US - looks like it has to come through a 3rd party seller"

You know, I wonder if that it means it will be available in the US next year or later this year. I am half tempted to order it,but I am so far ahead in the series, I don't know if it is worth it.


message 18: by Lili (new)

Lili | 28 comments Just completed Jo Nesbo's stand alone book Headhunters
Totally disappointed in this one, I knew before reading that it would be much different from his Harry Hole books but was still expecting a great read. What a let down!


message 19: by Ken (new)

Ken Fredette (klfredette) I felt the same. But, look at the movie they made out of the book. It's pretty good and has a lot of action and suspense.


message 20: by Diane S ☔ (new)

Diane S ☔ Haven't been reading much noir but I am reading a historical by a Swedish author called Sonata for Miriam: A Novel and I really love the way she writes.


message 21: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments I am really enjoying Lifetime by Liza Marklund. Not sure if it can be read as a stand alone. My initial reaction has been no, but it is really good without me reading all the books in the series. I have read the first two.


message 22: by Ed (new)

Ed (oct1647) | 8 comments Has Jo Nesbo's first Harry Hole mystery "The Bat" been translated into English and available for purchase anywhere?


message 23: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments I got it off Audible in audiobook, so i'm guessing yes


message 24: by Brad (new)

Brad | 15 comments I had it shipped from England.


message 25: by Anna, the Enabler (new)

Anna (aetm) | 192 comments I had mine shipped from UK too. It's I think also available in Canada (may be cheaper than UK shipping). Cockroaches isn't available in UK either yet...


message 26: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments I am trying a new German author Nele Neuhaus. Her book Snow White Must Diewas translated. I am kind of ticked off because it is #4 in the series. I am not enough into it to see how it will work out.


message 27: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments OMG...I can't believe how bland Snow White Must Diewas. I was so bored by it. 2 stars.


message 28: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments makes me glad I didn't spend an audible credit on it


message 29: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Now, Diane loved it. It was just too "soft" for me. I couldn't get into any of the characters. It was talked about being more psychological, but I didn't even see that.


message 30: by Diane S ☔ (last edited Feb 24, 2013 03:23PM) (new)

Diane S ☔ I thought it was psychological, maybe a little Minette Walters but I agree it did not have the coldness and unpretentiousness of most of the Nordic novels. This was German, so it takes a little getting used to. I don't think I have read many books that had been translated from the German. Our adult services librarians are all loving it, and one is actually from Germany. But again, that is why so many different books are written and also what makes for good discussions. Naomi and I usually agree quite a bit so it is always interesting to see the ones we disagree on.


message 31: by Dee, the Insanity Check (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 652 comments good point - Naomi and I tend to agree more than disagree (unless it is about romances, then I always rate higher than her)...


message 32: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Diane wrote: "I thought it was psychological, maybe a little Minette Walters but I agree it did not have the coldness and unpretentiousness of most of the Nordic novels. This was German, so it takes a little get..."

You know, Diane, I have read a number of German mysteries and I thought this was mild compared to some of them. Also, to me it focused too much on "feelings".


message 33: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments You know me...I like the GORE!!! lol I get to live vicariously!!!! lol


message 34: by Diane S ☔ (new)

Diane S ☔ Is there a list for German mysteries or thrillers? Would like to read a few more so I can compare.


message 35: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments I know I have stumbled upon them. Let me see if I can find something.


message 36: by Anna, the Enabler (new)

Anna (aetm) | 192 comments You could count Jan Costin Wagner as a German, or as a Finn - he's a German living in Finland, and kind of writes Finnish crime. But he's still kind of of German. You decide which. :)
There's a thread in the other group listing a bunch of authors in "the rest of Europe", meaning not Scandinavia. German crime authors don't seem that popular. Stopyourekillingme lists these http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/Loc... - so not that many, especially if you don't like crime set in earlier decades.
If Dutch could be OK as in "nearly German", perhaps Van De Wetering's series of Amsterdam cops might do. I think most of them are from the 80s. If you like Håkan Nesser's Van Veeteren series, you might like VDW, since Van Veeteren was supposed to be an homage for him.

Since I got hooked on Justified (TV series), I'm sensing I might soon be on full-blown Elmore Leonard binge. Fire in the Hole had the one short story which essentially was the first episode of Justified...


message 37: by Quentin (new)

Quentin (graskeggur) Naomi wrote: "I know I have stumbled upon them. Let me see if I can find something."

Ingrid Noll is a German writer worth checking out. Also Zoran Drvenkar. I read a book of his called 'Sorry' recently. It was interesting, pretty brutal stuff. Also definitely worth checking out Jakob Arjouni, a German writer of Turkish origin who died well before his time a few weeks ago.

Crime fiction is hugely popular in Germany and there's a whole bunch of German writers who have not been translated.

I can imagine the reactions of my Dutch and Flemish friends if I were to describe them as 'nearly German...' It's not something I'd dare say in their hearing...


message 38: by Richard (new)

Richard | 39 comments Elmore Leonard's greatness is with his early works--up to around the time they made a movie of 'Get Shorty'. After that, he became infatuated with fame and the famous and his writing suffered greatly. His last several books have not been worth my time. read the early books, particularly those set in Detroit.

Justified is my favorite TV show right now, and Elmore Leonard does not appear to have much to do with it, if anything. His son is listed as the Executive Producer, but Tim Olyphant is the real creative control now from what I've read.


message 39: by Richard (new)

Richard | 39 comments For novels set in Weimar Germany, Philip Kerr's Bernie Gunther series is top-notch and Jonathan Rabb has a Berlin Trilogy in this era. Bernie Gunther continues after the war, too.

Not German authors, but the feel of Weimar and the rise of Hitler comes through in both books. Both writers are worth your time.


message 40: by Quentin (new)

Quentin (graskeggur) Michael Ridpath, best known for his financial thrillers and more recently for his novels set in Iceland, has a new one coming out later this year (I think), set in pre-WW2 Berlin.


message 41: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Quentin wrote: "Michael Ridpath, best known for his financial thrillers and more recently for his novels set in Iceland, has a new one coming out later this year (I think), set in pre-WW2 Berlin."

LOVE Michael Ridpath.


message 42: by Anna, the Enabler (new)

Anna (aetm) | 192 comments Richard, are there any Leonard books you'd list as your favorites? Get Shorty as a book was not the greatest. I want to try some of the best ones so I'd like to add some to my list of stuff to hunt for.

I'd never dare to say to a Dutchman how close the Dutch and the German are. But until you find some German crime books that are available in English and are not written to be happening around 1930s or 1940s, at least the Dutch ones are a bit more closer to Germany than Håkan Nesser's Van Veeteren's "Sweden-like" gibberish location to Sweden. - More German authors definitely should be translated.


message 43: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments I ended up sending Michael an email. The only book of his that I have as coming out in the US is Meltwater but that is #3 in his series. It isn't a HF/mystery.


message 44: by Steven T. (new)

Steven T. Murray | 15 comments Naomi wrote: "You know me...I like the GORE!!! lol I get to live vicariously!!!! lol"

For GORE I recommend Sebastian Fitzek. He has two out about a guy who kills kids and collects their left eyes. Available on Amazon UK I think.


message 45: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Steven T. wrote: "Naomi wrote: "You know me...I like the GORE!!! lol I get to live vicariously!!!! lol"

For GORE I recommend Sebastian Fitzek. He has two out about a guy who kills kids and collects their left eyes...."


Don't like gore against kids. Do like gore though!


message 46: by Diane S ☔ (new)

Diane S ☔ Quentin wrote: "Naomi wrote: "I know I have stumbled upon them. Let me see if I can find something."

Ingrid Noll is a German writer worth checking out. Also Zoran Drvenkar. I read a book of his called 'Sorry' rec..."


Thanks Quentin. I have a friend who still has family in Germany, and she loves Petra Hammesfahr, but only two of her books have been translated in the states.


message 47: by Quentin (new)

Quentin (graskeggur) Naomi wrote: "I ended up sending Michael an email. The only book of his that I have as coming out in the US is Meltwater but that is #3 in his series. It isn't a HF/mystery."

Michael's new book is called Traitor's Gate. If you can find his Facebook page, there's a picture there of the cover. It's out in June on this side of the pond.
We have an agreement not to read each other's books, at least, not the Icelandic ones so that we can avoid any cross-pollination. But this one I will be able to read and I'm looking forward to it.
But my daughter has read his Icelandic books and she tells me they're the business.


message 48: by Naomi, the Sanity Check (new)

Naomi (nblackburn) | 932 comments Awesome! Thanks for the heads up Quentin!

LOVE HIS ICELAND BOOKS! I have Meltwater staring me in the face every day and I am so behind in reviews, I can't get to it!


message 49: by Steven T. (new)

Steven T. Murray | 15 comments Steven T. wrote: "Naomi wrote: "You know me...I like the GORE!!! lol I get to live vicariously!!!! lol"

For GORE I recommend Sebastian Fitzek. He has two out about a guy who kills kids and collects their left eyes...."


I know what you mean, I refuse to translate books where kids are the victims.


message 50: by Richard (new)

Richard | 39 comments Anna, I enjoyed the books Leonard wrote in the 1980's the most, roughly GOLD COAST through RIDING THE RAP. Once you get to 2002 and TISHOMINGO BLUES, his writing falls off a cliff. I think I enjoyed KILLSHOT the most, but it has been awhile.

Many don't know he started his career as a writer of Westerns, so his novels through 1970 are more John Wayne stories than crime novels. You should be aware of that.


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