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Books > What's the name of that book...? ( a little help here, please?)

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message 1: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
If you want help figuring out what the title or author of a book is...or was... post here.


message 2: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (last edited Dec 27, 2012 10:06AM) (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
I remeber reading a book when I was in high school, or maybe Jr. high school (so we're talking late 1970s here) of which the tittle I had once known, but have now forgotten (take that Churchill's Ghost!).

It was a world war two story about a guy who came to command a B-25 squadron in the pacific theater. he turned them into gunships, mounting machineguns everywhere he could find and took on some really dangerous missions. He went by the callsign "Whip" which was explained during a carrier battle (I think Midway) before he came to command his Liberator Squadron. The callsign/nickname/handle described how he flew his airplane in combat, whipping it back and forth to keep the AAA fire from getting him.

I remember it being a good read, but can't remember the title or author.


message 3: by Galen (new)

Galen Watson | 48 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: "I remeber reading a book when I was in high school, or maybe Jr. high school (so we're talking late 1970s here) of which the tittle I have forgotten (take that Churchill's Ghost!).

It was a worl..."


The book must be Whip by Martin Caidin. I read a lot about bombers in the early 80’s, after I married my wife. Her uncle had been a waist gunner in a B-17 flying fortress. He told stories of being shot down over Normandy, taken prisoner and shipped to a luft stalag in what is now the Czech Republic. Amazingly, he escaped on the winter death march back to Germany, ahead of advancing Russian troops, and the German resistance found him in the forest. They got him to Spain and eventually, back to England. He’s still living.


message 4: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (last edited Dec 27, 2012 10:07AM) (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
"Bull's Ear Catnip!" That's it!Whip by Martin Caidin.

And by the way, your Uncle-in-law sounds like a great character for an action adventure novel...jus' sayin'... ever sense I did a little skimming research on Arthur Blair and read Declare by Tim Powers, anything coming through and around spain from the Spanish Civil War to the end of World War II sounds really interesting to me.

That short synopsis of his story reminds me, some what, of my great x5 grandfather... He was captured by the British for Spying during the Revolutionary War and sent to the Tower of London. The US traded Cornwalis for him. Of course, it's not like I grew up listing to him tell me stories... but it's been a family story for a while. My mother tells it better... well that and the "Stop Kitty" story... which has nothing to do with this. (right, Mom?)

Thank you for your help. This was a really fun book and, it's hard to find if all you can put in the search engin is "Whip"... of course, you get to see some really interesting things during the search...(some of which should, shall and will remain nameless...(shudder)...for good reason. "That is the kind of thing, up with which I shall not put!")


message 5: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Galen wrote: "I, Curmudgeon wrote: "I remeber reading a book when I was in high school, or maybe Jr. high school (so we're talking late 1970s here) of which the tittle I have forgotten (take that Churchill's Gho..."

Great story. Your father-in-law must have some great stories to tell. My step dad told some stories about his time in the Koren war, not many. It was hard for him to talk about it. Now he's now longer with us and I wish he would have written the stories down or even record them.


message 6: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
Holy ape-"stuff" Batman, did you know that this Martin Caidin guy wrote the books that "The Six Million Dollar Man" (TV Show and Made for TV movie) were taken from? He's got a treasure trove of books he's written. A lot of them are good old fashioned Sci-fi and some of them are War Stories.

Sally Pomeroy, does Keith know about this guy?


message 7: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
and of course...none of them are on available on kindle...(sigh).


message 8: by Galen (new)

Galen Watson | 48 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: ""Bull's Ear Catnip!" That's it!Whip by Martin Caidin.

And by the way, your Uncle-in-law sounds like a great character for an action adventure novel...jus' sayin'... ever sense I did a little sk..."


I’m surprised they didn’t hang your x5grandfather on the spot—those impertinent, radical revolutionaries. He must have had some strategic value, especially if they valued him at the level of Cornwallis. Good on your mom for keeping the family history alive.

Two great stories; I better start outlining.


message 9: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
Galen wrote: "I, Curmudgeon wrote: ""Bull's Ear Catnip!" That's it!Whip by Martin Caidin.

And by the way, your Uncle-in-law sounds like a great character for an action adventure novel...jus' sayin'... ever s..."


Yes, his name was Henri St. Laurens, but that was later changed to Henry Laurens. He was the president of the First Continental Congress. The guys who came up with the Articles of Confederation.


message 10: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Hugh, Where's your mom? She needs to tell the story!


message 11: by Galen (new)

Galen Watson | 48 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: "Holy ape-"stuff" Batman, did you know that this Martin Caidin guy wrote the books that "The Six Million Dollar Man" (TV Show and Made for TV movie) were taken from? He's got a treasure trove of b..."

I just read that he wrote 80 books. Now that's prolific.


message 12: by Patricia (last edited Dec 30, 2012 10:54AM) (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments Eileen wrote: "Hugh, Where's your mom? She needs to tell the story!"

Never fear, Eileen, the MudgeonMama is here. (And a born story-teller she is. As was her Mama before her.)

The revolting ancestor (my Dad's phrase) that the Mudgeon is referring to is actually his 6X great grandfather. He was a lot of things, including one of several presidents of the Continental Congress. He was sent as an ambassador to Holland to try to borrow money to finance the revolutionary war. Of course, the British had them blockaded to prevent just such a maneuver.

Old Henry was trying to pass himself off as an innocent merchant when they were 'pulled over' by a British frigate. While Laurens was busily trying to explain to the captain how hard it was for a merchant to make a living in these difficult times, his secretary, a young man, was busily stuffing his real credentials into a leather mail sack. This unnamed hero then stuffed a paperweight into the sack and shoved it out of a port hole.

Unfortunately, a sharp-eyed British seaman saw it emerge from the port hole. Air trapped in the leather sack caused it to sink slowly, and the sailor dived overboard and retrieved it.

Picture this scene--here is Old Henry, lying through his teeth, trying to save his skin, and the sailor comes dripping over the side with the mail-sack. Busted!

Laurens resided in the Tower prison (actually more like a house inside the walls) for the rest of the war. He became very ill, and the head jailer, fearing this valuable prisoner might die on him, took him to live with his family in their private quarters. They nursed him back to health, and he became very fond of them.

When he was finally repatriated in exchange for Cornwallis, he brought home a keepsake--the salt dishes they used on the table. I have one of them, and my brother has the other. I also have the wedding ring Henry gave to Eleanor Ball in 1715. It is engaved "HL to EB 1715" inside. Cool, huhn?

One interesting and pretty cool facts about him is that after the war, when the country was trying to compose the Constitution, he recognized the inconsistency of owning seven rice plantations-worth of slaves in South Carolina and freed all of them. That was in part in honor of his son John, who was killed during the fighting. John was a fire-eating abolitionist.

And Mudgeon, the stop kitty story best remains untold.


message 13: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments While the family name when they arrived in New World was St. Laurent, I suspect by the time Henry was born, they had already anglicized it. His grandfather, I believe, was Andre' St. Laurent. His father was John (Jean).

More than you wanted to hear? Maybe some of you like history. Otherwise, delete.


message 14: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
Patti wrote: "And Mudgeon, the stop kitty story best remains untold.."

Yeah, but it's funnier than my Snake Story...when you tell it anyway. Adam's not on Goodreads that often, he'll never know. I'm sure all 420+ of us can keep a secret.

(/P-{D>)


message 15: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: "Patti wrote: "And Mudgeon, the stop kitty story best remains untold.."

Yeah, but it's funnier than my Snake Story...when you tell it anyway. Adam's not on Goodreads that often, he'll never know. ..."


I promised Adam I would never tell anyone else.


message 16: by Eileen (new)

Eileen Thank you, Patti! (aka..MudgeonMama)

I'm sorry it took me so long to respond, the holidays kept me pretty busy.

What a great story and I really appreciate you taking the time to share that funny and very interesting family history.

Wow...I can't believe you and your brother have those rings from 1715. Yes...that is very cool!

You tell a good story and now I really have to read one of your books.


message 17: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
and...I never promised not to tell the kitty story... (Cue villain laugh).


message 18: by Galen (last edited Jan 03, 2013 04:09PM) (new)

Galen Watson | 48 comments Patti wrote: "...when the country was trying to compose the Constitution, he recognized the inconsistency of owning seven rice plantations-worth of slaves in South Carolina and freed all of them. That was in part in honor of his son John, who was killed during the fighting. John was a fire-eating abolitionist."

The synopsis is finished; let the storytelling begin. This is a fascinating tale any writer worth his or her salt dish would love to tell--drama, conflict on a world-changing scale, transformational character. Contrast Henri’s abolitionist act of conscience to Jefferson, who had the sentiment, but not enough will to act on it. What makes it more remarkable, was that slaves were wealth and Henri’s gift of freedom would have cost him dearly. He was no ditherer.


message 19: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
From what I've heard, and read some of, Henri as a younger man, before he was the dignified statesman along side Ben Franklin, would have made a wonderful character for a Ramage style historical action adventure.


message 20: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments Eileen wrote: "Thank you, Patti! (aka..MudgeonMama)

I'm sorry it took me so long to respond, the holidays kept me pretty busy.

What a great story and I really appreciate you taking the time to share that funny..."


I'm glad you enjoyed the story, Eileen. If you do read one of my books, I hope you enjoy it, too. The first one is only available used. The rest are on Kindle. I don't get paid for used ones, of course, and I am not sure if I get anything from Kindle sales, (Harl's contracts are a little murky) but I still enjoy people reading my stories. That is why I wrote them.


message 21: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: "and...I never promised not to tell the kitty story... (Cue villain laugh)."

You won't enjoy it unless your brother is here to embarrass.


message 22: by The Pirate Ghost, Long John Silvers Wanna-be (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) | 5327 comments Mod
Well, I'm not so sure about that, but, I'll put the Kitty Story on pause, stay with the snake story and think about it.

(/P-{D>


message 23: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments Galen wrote: "Patti wrote: "...when the country was trying to compose the Constitution, he recognized the inconsistency of owning seven rice plantations-worth of slaves in South Carolina and freed all of them. T..."

I am proud to tell that story about him. Galen. Although I must admit that his earliest business was shipping slaves. But he gave that up early. His son was probably the greatest influence on the decision to free them.

In a story I stumbled across on the net I found an interesting quote from Henry while he was a prisoner in the tower. Apparently the British used threats against him to attempt to influence John, his son, who was a fighting for us rebels. Henry knew they were barking up the wrong tree. He said of his son (slightly paraphrased, no doubt) "My son is a man of honor, and he would gladly lay down his life to save mine, but he will not compromise his honor to do so, and I applaud him."

You know, we don't talk about honor enough anymore.

I have often thought about writing the story, but somehow that era/setting just hasn't appealed to me.

And yes, I believe we can safely say that he had plenty of will and did not dither.


message 24: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (pattipunkin) | 267 comments I, Curmudgeon wrote: "From what I've heard, and read some of, Henri as a younger man, before he was the dignified statesman along side Ben Franklin, would have made a wonderful character for a Ramage style historical ac..."

Right, Mudgeon. As a younger man Henry was said to have been a fire-eater himself, and he fought several duels. Those would have been with swords, I reckon.

He was friends with Ben F. and other statesmen of the time. Went to Paris with John Jay to hammer out one of the treaties with the British. (My memory fogs.)

It was a much smaller world/country in those days, especially for land-owners. Lauren's wife was a cousin of Martha Washington. His son-in-law, Charles Pinckney signed the Constitution, along his cousin, Charles C. P. Pinckney's son-in-law was well known during the Civil War. (No longer on the side of the Angels.) I have heirlooms from all of them. Which is sort of fun. But what the heck am I to do with them?


message 25: by Robert (new)

Robert Rapoza | 26 comments Reading the posts written by everyone here is like reading a book on the behind the scenes happenings from history. Some very knowledgeable people here. Thank you all for sharing.

Bob


message 26: by Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen) , Literary Adrenaline Junkie (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 4707 comments Mod
Our September group read nominations thread is open. Help select on our From bookish to Bad*ss group read. The poll goes up on August 9th.

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...



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Books mentioned in this topic

Declare (other topics)
Ramage (other topics)
Whip (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Martin Caidin (other topics)