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Past group quizzes/comps > Nominate a group book. Win £10

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message 1: by Simon (Highwayman) (last edited Dec 01, 2012 04:37PM) (new)

Simon (Highwayman) (highwayman) | 4697 comments Hi everyone. In the spirit of being bone idle I have found a way of getting the January Books selected and having a competition all in one go....

Throughout December you are invited to nominate a group book for January 2013

Post your nomination on this thread.

A few rules :

Please put the title and author right at the top of your post so we can seperate it from general chatter.

The book must be available on Kindle. Link to it if you wish.

The book must have been published more than 5 years ago (give or take). This will give us a selection of classics and traditional publishers I hope.

Give a reason for your recommendation.


The 4 best nominations judged on the reason for the nomination (not the merits of the book) will win a £10 Amazon voucher and the book will be a book of the month for January.

What you put in your nomination is up to you, it can be humourous, serious, related to something that has touched you... anything really.

I will occasionally scrape the nominations up and put them in another thread.

No self promotion please.


Simon (Highwayman) (highwayman) | 4697 comments Feel free to chat about this competition in this thread. I usually miss out important details so I am expecting some questions...


message 3: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hill | 1599 comments Great idea, Simon. I take it there is just one nomination per person?


Simon (Highwayman) (highwayman) | 4697 comments I just knew someone would ask that question. Not sure. Lets say one nomination only to start with. We can see how much interest the competition gets.


message 5: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hill | 1599 comments Right, I'll think carefully before nominating then!


Patti (baconater) (Goldengreene) | 61381 comments This is a great idea Simon.

I'm sure we can all come up with books we've loved and would like to share with others.


message 7: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 23999 comments Oh yes! (How to cut the list down though?)
I'll have a think.


Patti (baconater) (Goldengreene) | 61381 comments I think the key is to think of why we want to nominate it...

I'm going to have to come up with better than 'Cuz it's good', aren't I?

And this is why I struggle with writing reviews...


message 9: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments Lol yes will need to think about it.


message 10: by D.M. Andrews (author) (last edited Dec 01, 2012 05:19AM) (new)

D.M. Andrews (author) Andrews (DMAndrews) | 1551 comments The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien

Reason: Coz everyone and their dog will be talking about it, and we want to be cool and relevant :)


message 11: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments haha I was going to say that. I think I may just read it again. I don't have it as an e-book but I do have a lovely paperback copy.


message 12: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments Unless of course we can have a discussion about the important parts the film missed. The influences on Fantasy and the genre, the influences on more modern literature and the relevance in today's world.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

I can think of lots of books to nominate - what I can't think of are funny or unique reasons to read them! Will get my thinking cap on..

:0)


message 14: by Michael (new)

Michael Brookes (Technohippy) | 2942 comments Excession by Ian M Banks

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Excession-ebo...

This is my favourite novel I've ever read. For me it epitomises what science fiction is all about.

So why is Excession such a great book?

The first reason is the big idea. Something Banks and other good science fiction authors do is have a big idea at the core of the story. In this case it is an excession event, an object appears that cannot be understood by even the technologically advanced races nearby. The story concerns the effects the event has rather than trying to explore the event itself.

It also has one of the one of the most fun alien races I've encountered - the Affront. Floating gas bags of a cruel disposition they make a fine contrast to the Culture. It also raises some interesting questions about a high technology society that is for the most part peaceful deal with a technologically inferior but much more hostile race. Of course the Culture feature heavily in the story and brings with it some of the more interesting characters - the ship's minds.

Something that struck me as I first read the book is the communications between the ship's minds. To me he really captures the aspects of artificial intelligences as well as making them interesting characters.


message 15: by R.M.F (new)

R.M.F Brown | 4128 comments The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro.

There's no sex, no drugs, no rock 'n' roll, and the film adaption doesn't star Tom Cruise.

Who would have thought that a book about an English stately home could be such a compelling read? Not me anyway!!

If you can judge the quality of a book by how many copies of it clogs up your local charity shop, then the trees that were sacrificed for this tome went to a better place.

The world of Stevens the butler, and not a machine gun or fast car in sight.


message 16: by Kath (new)

Kath Middleton | 23999 comments That's a very compelling reason for your choice Michael.


Gingerlily - All kinds of everything! | 36402 comments I have a book in mind, but I have to work on my reason. *wanders off to brush up on persuaviveness skills*


message 18: by Jim (new)

Jim | 18967 comments I Nominate The Wallet of Kai Lung - Kai Lung 1 by Ernest Bramah
I chose this book, set in a China that never really was (but should have been) because of the wit and the language.
You'll either love it or not see the point but it's a free download so what's not to like :-)


message 19: by Kath (last edited Dec 01, 2012 09:30AM) (new)

Kath Middleton | 23999 comments http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Once-Futu...

The Once and Future King by T H White.

This book is NOT a Disneyfied horror, as you might fear. I read it many years ago and have several times since. It's in three parts and begins with the childhood and education of the young Arthur (known to his foster-brother as Wart since it sort of rhymes with Art). Merlin's Owl helps with his education. The lad is introduced magically to lots of animals and learns from each of them, strength, patience, courage etc. They all, even the least significant, have something worth learning.

Parts 2 and 3 cover the parts of the Arthurian Legends you might be more familiar with. T H White writes with such wisdom though, that the book touches on the very deepest of human emotions and dilemmas. It covers subjects like honour, betrayal, the good of the community against that of the individual. It deals with a life that has to be lived apart, by its nature, and the loneliness of the outsider. It leads us to consider how the King has to balance the love of his friend, of his wife, the knowledge of an infidelity he would rather not acknowledge, the betrayal by another woman, family honour - oh, it's a wonderful book and involves me so deeply every time I read it!

The first part might seem trivial (although if you look deeper it isn't) but the rest is pure drama. I love it!


message 20: by Maeve (new)

Maeve | 1 comments i nominate Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell as first it is sience fiction, second it seems really ineresting and third, the movie is coming out so when we finish the book we can see the movie and disuss on whether it lived upto its reputation or not. (which i love doing)

also i already own the book on my kindle, it's a win,win situation!


message 21: by Darren (new)

Darren Humphries (Darrenhf) | 6824 comments The Haunting of Hill House

Simply the finest ghost story ever. It has influenced every one told since it was written. It would have been my pick when were doing personal book picks way back when, but it broke the price rules. For me it is worth every penny.

Check out the sample and if the first few lines don't make you shiver then you just might already be dead.


message 22: by Michael (new)

Michael (MichaelDiack) | 185 comments http://www.amazon.co.uk/Amazon-Advent...

The adventure series by Willard Price starring brothers Hal and Roger.

I remember fondly going to the library on Saturday afternoons and reading these books. The story has everything to appeal to younger readers and I'm sure is loved by any age range. As a nature and geography enthusiast, these books were perfect - fast paced storytelling, action, adventure and a healthy dose of trivia about animals and the world. The books fueled my imagination and inspired me to want to learn more about the animals and places mentioned.

Books like this just some up why it is so important for children to read and - hopefully - be inspired, motivated and eager to read and learn more beyond the subject of the book they just read. All the books from this series sit proudly on my bookshelf, waiting for the day I can hopefully read them to my kids.


message 23: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments Oh I remeber the Willard Price Books:) I read them all over and over again and they taught me a lot about animals. They are a little un-pc now as it is not the done thing to collect animals from the wild for zoos but I think they do bring an important message about wildlife, local cultures and preserving the environment.


message 24: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments I nominateReaper Man. This was the first Prattchet book I read and I was laughing so hard everyone on the train was staring at me:)

It is deeply funny but also quite moving and Pratchett at his best. A wonderful slice of satire, fantasy and damn fine writing.


message 25: by Michael (new)

Michael Brookes (Technohippy) | 2942 comments Reaper Man is a good choice, while I think Prachett has written better books, it's still one of my favourites.


message 26: by A.L. (last edited Dec 02, 2012 09:37AM) (new)

A.L. Butcher (ALB2012) | 1669 comments That one was my initiation into Pratchett:) SOul music I love too:) That made me cry.


message 27: by Elle (last edited Dec 02, 2012 10:04AM) (new)

Elle (Louiselesley) | 7914 comments I don't think I could recommend anything other than Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone without a clear conscience.

This was the book that changed the entire course of my life. I mean, sometimes you can read a book and call it life changing but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't of changed your life as much as this did mine.

Without the Harry Potter series I don't think I would of gotten into reading as much as I did. I don't think I would of discovered PNR/UR/Fantasy and I wouldn't of got to read as many amazing books that I have.

Without Harry Potter I wouldn't of opened the 4 birthday cards and presents this morning from long time friends that I've met several times in real life that I originally met in the Harry Potter fandom. I wouldn't of woken up to a few dozen livejournal entries with different types of art for me saying Happy Birthday. I wouldn't of gotten many texts/twitter messages/facebook posts from people who share the exact same obsession with these books.

I wouldn't of got the chance to terrorise visit Edinburgh, London, Bath, York and many more places as much as I have over the years. (I wouldn't of met GL & Emma earlier in the Summer!!)

I wouldn't of known how amazing fandom is. I wouldn't of got into several other fandoms after I found out there is more to life than HP.

I wouldn't of spent several years of my life relying on my online friends and those books to just keep me going while I was drugged up with my anti-depressants. I don't like to think what I would of done without my support network.

I wouldn't of had an automatic way to cheer me up even all these years later. Just mention HP and I can't help but smile with how much it seriously improved my life.


I sound like a sap when I start talking about HP but there is no way I would have the life I lead now if it wasn't for those books and now that it is ended we need to keep it alive, because I need to keep my smile lasting forever.


message 28: by Jim (new)

Jim | 18967 comments Louise-Lesley (Elle) wrote: "I don't think I could recommend anything other than Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone without a clear conscience.

This was the book that changed the entire course of my life. I mean, sometimes..."



I really hope that J K Rowling will at some point see your post, because I suspect it will mean a great deal to her.
You've just made her whole writing career so worthwhile.


Patti (baconater) (Goldengreene) | 61381 comments Louise-Lesley (Elle) wrote: "I don't think I could recommend anything other than Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone without a clear conscience.

This was the book that changed the entire course of my life. I mean, sometimes..."


Freaking wow.


message 30: by Kath (new)

Kath | 1965 comments Louise-Lesley (Elle) wrote: "I don't think I could recommend anything other than Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone without a clear conscience.

This was the book that changed the entire course of my life. I mean, sometimes..."


firstly dont ever feel you sound "like a sap" about reading/watching/enjoying anything that moves you or changes your life or touches you in even just a small way.
i admit that i only read the last HP book, (seen all the films now) but i have all the books on audio book and absolutely love listening to them. it's pure escapism for me and i love them for that...


message 31: by Steve (new)

Steve Robinson (SteveRobinson) | 2930 comments I'd like to recommend The Voyage of the Dawntreader by C.S. Lewis.

In much the same way that Elle previously said that the Harry Potter books changed her life because they got her into reading, the same is true of the Chronicles of Narnia for me and this was my, albeit close, favourite. Along with J.R.R. Tolkien, fellow Inklings' member, Lewis, was one of those writers at the forefront of modern fantasy fiction and I have a lot to thank him for in terms of unlocking my own imagination. This book in particular is undoubtedly one of the reasons I write. It's young reading of course, but I think it's still a great and wondrous adventure however old you are. :o)


message 32: by Jud (new)

Jud (Judibud) | 17934 comments I think Elle should win


message 33: by Anita (new)

Anita | 3758 comments WOW Elle ! What a lovely write up, I think you should win too.
I will have to think which book I will nominate.


Jay-me (Janet)  | 4270 comments I can't remember not reading, there have been so many books that I have read that it would be difficult to pick just one. But after a lot of thought I have decided on one that is one of the earliest books I remember.
I'm sure you all have stories that your family embarrass you with at times - I have certainly had my fair share
- the time a complete stranger ran into my grandma's house shouting because I was climbing out of the bedroom window (grandma had new windows put in after that, ones that didn't open at the bottom)
- the time I poured gravy into my pockets to save it for later
- the time I pulled a stone flag on top of myself (I was just seeing how heavy it was)

I have to say I don't remember those events (except the flag - I do remember that one)

One of the other stories that people tell about me is about my favourite book. I had had that book read to me so many times that I knew it by heart. My aunt didn't like reading it to me and would often skip bits - so I would tell her "Excuse me" (I was always polite) "You have missed out the bit that goes............"


So the book that I nominate is Black Beauty by Anna Sewell


message 35: by Jim (new)

Jim | 18967 comments Black Beauty!
I shudder to think how many years it is since I first read that. I haven't even seen my copy for four decades, but I must have read it a dozen times when I was younger.
Not a fashionable choice, but a good choice :-)


message 36: by Kate (new)

Kate Baggott (httpswwwgoodreadscomkate_baggott) | 104 comments The History of Love
by Nicole Krauss.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-History-o...

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss is an absolutely beautiful story about working through loss by making connections, solving mysteries and being true to the workings of love. A father and son, separated by the holocaust, find each other. A young girl learns about her parents' relationship and her mother's mysterious translation job. A book, almost lost in language and time, unites the two stories.


message 37: by Vic (new)

Vic Heaney (Vic_Heaney) | 689 comments Maeve wrote: "i nominate Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell as first it is sience fiction, second it seems really ineresting and third, the movie is coming out so when we finish the book we can see the movie and disu..."

I have seen the film, Maeve. I suspect that one should read the book first in order to understand the film. I was bewildered.


message 38: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Hill | 1599 comments I nominate Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks. I don't think any other book has moved me more. Before reading it, the First World War was just facts and figures to me. This book made it real. It is harrowing, gripping and moving.


message 39: by Katie (new)

Katie Stewart (Katiewstewart) | 853 comments I know it's not likely to get selected because it's so long, but I'd like to nominate Les Misérables by Victor Hugo -

1. because in between the long passages of description there are some of the best characters ever written.
2. because there's a movie of the musical that has its premiere on Christmas Day and no one should watch it without having read the book.

There are passages of this book I still go back to when I'm struggling to write a scene. Hugo knew how to draw pictures using as few lines as possible. I know that sounds mad when the book is so long, but his characters say so much without saying anything. He was the master of that.


message 40: by R.M.F (new)

R.M.F Brown | 4128 comments Katie wrote: "I know it's not likely to get selected because it's so long, but I'd like to nominate Les Misérables by Victor Hugo -

1. because in between the long passages of description there are some of the b..."


And it inspired an episode of Star Trek deep space nine!


Geoff (G. Robbins) (merda constat variat altitudo) (Snibborg) | 9019 comments Winter, by Len Deighton.

Winter, is one of Len Deighton's best books. Many of his spy books revolve around Bernard Sampson who, as a youth, lived and played in the post-war devastation of Berlin before the division, whilst his father worked there. His knowledge of Berlin and his connections lead him to be recruited by the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) during the Cold War.

During that time he and his parents lived in the Winter household.

This book tells the story of that family and of how they came to the point where they were forced to have to take in boarders to live.

The story, as the title states, runs from 1899 to 1945, just before the Sampsons arrive. Deighton's attention to detail and historical accuracy (he always researches his subject meticulously) layer beautifully upon the intricate story of the characters to provide a real page turner.

When I finished this story I felt that I had lost some friends, I was so engrossed. You do not have to be interested in history or war to enjoy this book. However, do not be surprised to be more informed by the end of this superbly entertaining book. If there was one book that got me interested in reading historical novels, history books and history itself, then this is probably the one.

Winter is available as a Kindle book here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Winter-Berlin... at £2.99


message 42: by Katy (new)

Katy | 3410 comments Have deleted my entry as just realised it is not on Kindle! Sorry (:


message 43: by Vic (new)

Vic Heaney (Vic_Heaney) | 689 comments Geoff (G. Robbins) (The noisy passionfruit) wrote: "Winter, by Len Deighton.

Winter, is one of Len Deighton's best books. Many of his spy books revolve around Bernard Sampson who, as a youth, lived and played in the post-war devastation of Berlin ..."


I agree with you, Geoff. Excellent choice, excellent book. And it leads on to so much more as it gives basis and background to 9 more books - the three trilogies - "Faith", "Hope" and "Charity" for instance.

All those books mine "Winter" for their characters and many of the situations. Together, the ten books are a wonderful read and both Gay and I have done the circuit more than once.

Look no further, Simon :-)


message 44: by Elle (new)

Elle (Louiselesley) | 7914 comments Katy wrote: "Have deleted my entry as just realised it is not on Kindle! Sorry (:"

If the book is so important to a member of our group I would gladly read the paperback Katy. Please put your entry back up <3


message 45: by Katy (last edited Dec 09, 2012 08:53AM) (new)

Katy | 3410 comments I nominate "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.

It isn't on kindle, but Elle told me to put my nomination back up as she was happy to read a paperback.

I read this book as a recommendation from a librarian when I was much younger. It really changed my life. I saw the world in a completely different way.

I learned not to judge people before getting to know them, and that not everything is black and white.

I also studied it for GCSE much later, and it is the only book I have studied and enjoyed; I just took more from it.

I can still quote bits of it, have seen the play and have seen the black and white film. When asked what my favourite book is, it automatically springs to mind.

It also holds a place in my heart, as a few years ago I was going through a very.. dark time, when I lost my grandpa, and this book really helped me get back to who I am now. I was mute for a long time, and just didn't enjoy anything. I went into the library when my grandma was shopping, and the librarian told me to try this book. I enjoyed it so much I made a point of saying thank you to her.

It just means a lot to me, and I have re-read it many times. I feel like the characters are friends now (:


Gingerlily - All kinds of everything! | 36402 comments The Gods Themselves - Isaac Asimov

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Gods-Them...

I loved this book when I was a teen still living at home and constantly looking for new books to fuel my imagination. I was, and still am, an Isaac Asimov fan, but this one seemed to have a special place in my heart.

Maybe its because he has come up with a race of aliens who look very different to us, but are still easy to identify with. Maybe because of the theme of growing up, maturity and responsibility, and maybe for the theme of energy consumption and its possible consequesnces. Whatever it was, something stuck with me.

I love the quote he put in parts at the beginning of each section, and which provided the title...


First part: Against Stupidity...
Second part: ...The Gods Themselves...
Third part: ...Contend in Vain?


I think it is just as relevant now as it was then - even more so perhaps...?


message 47: by Helen (new)

Helen (helenjbeal) Awesome book - I love the duality of the title. Love this author too - he hasn't produced any novels more recently though has I don't think? One of my all time favourites has to be:


Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro


message 48: by Helen (new)

Helen (helenjbeal) My earlier comment was regarding The Remains of the Day - sorry I didn't realise it wouldn't link to it! :-(

This is my, somewhat left-field suggestion for a read:


The Picture of Dorian Gray


message 49: by Jud (new)

Jud (Judibud) | 17934 comments I still can't think of anything to nominate. Although I second Les Misérables


message 50: by R.M.F (new)

R.M.F Brown | 4128 comments Geoff (G. Robbins) (The noisy passionfruit) wrote: "Winter, by Len Deighton.

Winter, is one of Len Deighton's best books. Many of his spy books revolve around Bernard Sampson who, as a youth, lived and played in the post-war devastation of Berlin ..."


I like Deighton's work - he's very underrated. I want to make clear that this is not support for a rival nomination :)that £10 will soon be introduced to the other windsor sisters in my wallet :)


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