The Year of Reading Proust discussion

Within a Budding Grove (In Search of Lost Time, #2)
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Within a Budding Grove, vol. 2 > Through Sunday, 31 Mar.: Within a Budding Grove

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message 1: by Kris, Obsessive Comproustive (last edited Jan 04, 2013 08:16PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kris (krisrabberman) | 136 comments Mod
This thread is for the discussion that will take place through Sunday, 31 Mar. of Within a Budding Grove, to page 417 (to the paragraph beginning: “After dinner, when I had gone upstairs...”)


·Karen· (kmoll) | 318 comments I'm very much enjoying the social profiling of the guests at the Grand Hotel. Those 'bons bourgeois', the local dignitaries from the legal profession and the bigger cheeses from Paris who set themselves up as a hotel aristocracy because they're on first name terms with the waiter and are knitting for his baby's layette. So disdainful of the tin-pot royalty, and the young man throwing away his fortune at baccara (fyi: my notes say that this young man may have been, at least partially, inspired by Jean Cocteau) and the titled lady travelling with ALL her household staff.

And then it seems that everyone is doing much the same thing, holding on desperately to some facade of security in face of all these unknown forms of life:

"Mais tout le monde dans cet hôtel agissait de la même manière qu'elles, bien que sous d'autres formes, et sacrifiait, sinon à l'amour propre, du moins à certains principes d'éducation ou à des habitudes intellectuelles, le trouble délicieux de se mêler à une vie inconnue."

And then later there they all are as if in a huge aquarium, with the lower orders pressing their noses up against the glass, and the narrator wondering if the glass will hold forever or if those observers will come and eat the strange creatures.

It occurred to me that this kind of indiscriminate mixing of the middle, upper-middle and aristocratic classes must have been a very new thing that really only came about with the advent of rail travel and the kind of seaside resort that grew up as a consequence of this revolution in travel. Otherwise the separate classes moved very much within their own circles. Hence, presumably, this kind of delineation based on perceived vulgarity/absurdity/immorality rather than such things as titles.


message 3: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments I've just read this part, Karen and your comments sum it up very well. It certainly was a 'goldfish bowl' and we can understand only too well how ill at ease the narrator and his wonderful grandmother must have felt living in such a public way. The wonder is that any of us really enjoy the public nature of hotel living but we seem to since the institution of the 'hotel' has become an established way of spending holidays. But it must have been especially odd in the early days of such resort hotels when people who had their own cooks at home and perhaps never dined in restaurants suddenly found themselves elbow to elbow, eating within meters of each other, close enough to see what was on each others plates and passing each other in corridors.


·Karen· (kmoll) | 318 comments It's amusing how the newness of this situation plays in: Legrandin's brother-in-law doesn't quite know the form, and takes his hat off when he enters the hotel lobby. He's obviously unsure of whether this is a public space or a private company.


message 5: by Fionnuala (last edited Mar 25, 2013 07:29AM) (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments The camel in the white wig disguise, or some other fishy relative, might fit to illustrate the scene in the diningroom with the rarefied Saint Germainite whose 'appendice buccal est d'un grand poisson de mer.' Proust can be truly wicked sometimes, and we so enjoy it!


message 6: by Marcelita (last edited Mar 25, 2013 03:43PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments Karen wrote: "I'm very much enjoying the social profiling of the guests at the Grand Hotel. Those 'bons bourgeois', the local dignitaries from the legal profession and the bigger cheeses from Paris who set thems..."

"...young man throwing away his fortune..."
I force myself not to think how Proust seeps into almost every character.
"...with an orchid in his buttonhole..."

Bill Carter writes in his biography (page 432) about a letter Proust wrote to Robert de Billy, describing his visit to Cabourg in 1907. Proust wrote that he would "...gamble-and lose-at baccarat every evening, etc.-all this among the commonest set of people in the world."


message 7: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (last edited Mar 26, 2013 05:14AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Jean Cocteau on Marcel Proust, from the Radio.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUgIkn...

Amongst other things, he says that Proust's work seems short to him. I think I will also be sorry when we are done...


message 8: by Martin (new)

Martin Gibbs | 105 comments We have a little more of that multi-layered narrative Elizabeth mentioned:

“Mistake my poor chick’s knocking for anyone else! Why, Granny could tell it among a thousand! Do you suppose there’s anyone else in the world who’s such a silly-billy, with such feverish little knuckles, so afraid of waking me up and of not making me understand? Even if he just gave the least scratch, Granny could tell her mouse’s sound at once, especially such a poor miserable little mouse as mine is."

We get to hear both the soothing words that filter through the narrator's ear, as well as the tones of irritation and the mental sighing from the grandmother's point of view.


message 9: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Promenade à Cabourg





And "le lift"




Amelia Jestings | 20 comments Jaye I am in New England and the dreary winter is getting to me. My favorite passage of this week is when he said, "... I returned to the window to have another look at the vast, dazzling, mountainous amphitheatre, and at the snowy crests of its emerald waves, here and there polished and translucent, which with a placid violence and a leonine frown, to which the sun added a faceless smile allowed their crumbling slopes to topple down at last."


message 11: by Manny (last edited Mar 26, 2013 08:14AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Manny (mannyrayner) | 27 comments Kalliope wrote: "Promenade à Cabourg"

One of my favorite moments in Dance to the Music of Time (in any book, when you come to that), is where the narrator, shortly after the D-Day landings, looks around the shot-up French town he's in and thinks: OMG. This is Cabourg, Balbec, and here is the restaurant where Marcel sees the fashionable people dining, looking like exotic sea-creatures.

Completely understated, like most Anthony Powell, but such a terrific comment on the eternal value of great art.


message 12: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Manny wrote: "Kalliope wrote: "Promenade à Cabourg"

One of my favorite moments in Dance to the Music of Time (in any book, when you come to that), is where the narrator, shortly after the D-Day landings, looks ..."


Manny, thank you for the quote and link.. may be 2014 will be my year of Anthony Powell.

I am seeing Proust, or missing not seeing him,in many things I read now..


message 13: by Marcelita (last edited Mar 26, 2013 07:11PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments One of my favorite reading weeks.
I will leave "the trees" for another, but the echo of something "lost" for the narrator, on this carriage ride, was "found" for Monet, in a neighboring seaside town.

The narrator sees "the ivy-covered church," which can be found today along "The Road from Trouville to Honfleur."
A painting by the same name...leads us to Boudin, the man who taught Monet to see "the light," and tales of women's corsets and their influence on the rise of these summer retreats.

The "Ivy Covered" Church on the road from Trouville to Honfleur by Boudin.
http://honfleurthenandnow.blogspot.co...

"The Church of St. Martin Cricqueboeuf: "'The Ivy-Chapel' is a small Romanesque church built in the 11th century which has probably replaced an ancient sanctuary. In the early 19th century due to lack of it is no longer maintained, ivy invades, roofs collapsed. In 1853 to widen the road on empute the nave of two bays and decreases the cemetery. In the 20th century it disappears under the vegetation."
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=thOYtI...

Eugene-Louis Boudin
"The Road from Trouville to Honfleur" Eugène Boudin was one of the first French landscape painters to paint outdoors. Boudin was a marine painter, and expert in the rendering of all that goes upon the sea and along its shores. His pastels, summary and economic, garnered the splendid eulogy of Baudelaire, and Corot who, gazing at his pictures, said to him, "You are the master of the sky."
http://www.paintingmania.com/road-tro...

"Eugene Boudin: The Man Who Inspired Monet"
by SUSAN STAMBERG

Pause, treat yourself by listening to this NPR story (7minutes)
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...

Excerpts:
"Eugene Boudin, who coaxed Claude Monet to the seaside and inspired him to paint in the open air, ran a framing shop before taking up painting himself."
"There was that amazing light — the rich blue skies, dotted with scudding, big-bellied clouds that shifted the sunlight, making fields and rocks broody, then brilliant, in a flash. Monet capitulated, came to Honfleur, and he and Boudin painted side by side, outside, using portable easels and paint in tubes."
"And suddenly, suddenly, Claude Monet just understood what his friend had been telling him about," says Aussenac. "He understood. He said afterward that it was just like a curtain that [had opened] in front of his eyes. He understood what his life was about, and what painting was about."

(Tale about corsets, fainting and the cure.)
"Now, in those days going into the sea was not for the faint-hearted. Ladies changed into bathing costumes inside little cabins; then horses pulled the cabin across the sand, and the lady emerged."
"And outside waiting for her was a big, strong, handsome man," Aussenac says. "And he would take her in his arms and walk into the sea, and put her in the water — once, twice, three times. ... Afterward he would bring her back to the cabin, and this was the sea-bathing session — isn't that nice?"

For those traveling to France this summer:
http://en.ot-honfleur.fr/discover-hon...)
http://www.musees-honfleur.fr/
http://www.musees-honfleur.fr/modules...


message 14: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (last edited Mar 26, 2013 01:42PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Sorry, but with sentences like "cet éclairage aveuglant de la plage" and then the very title "l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleur" it is the Sorolla paintings of the beach that again come to my mind.




message 15: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments Like the narrator and his grandmother, I've been enjoying Mme de Villeparisis and her interesting views as well as her anecdotes about the famous writers she met in her youth but then she quotes Sainte-Beuve, and knowing as we do what the narrator thinks of Sainte-Beuve and his tendency to judge an artist by his life rather than his work, I'm reminded of the way the narrator set us up to think that M Norpois was an expert on everything and then began to dismantle Norpois and his views, bit by bit, so I'm expecting him to do the same to poor Mme de Villeparisis...


message 16: by Fionnuala (last edited Mar 26, 2013 02:04PM) (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments Marcelita wrote: "One of my favorite reading weeks.
I will leave "the trees" for another, but the echo of something "lost" for the narrator, on this carriage ride, was "found" for Monet, in a neighboring seaside to..."


Great links, Marcelita.
I love the old postcard of the ivy covered church - it's just as I imagined it.

And that Sorolla painting is just right, Kalliope!


·Karen· (kmoll) | 318 comments These fleeting glimpses of gorgeous girls from the moving carriage, and the narrator's story, years later, of him leaping out to follow a young woman he's seen (and ending up in front of old Mme Verdurin) remind me of Baudelaire:

À une passante

La rue assourdissante autour de moi hurlait.
Longue, mince, en grand deuil, douleur majestueuse,
Une femme passa, d'une main fastueuse
Soulevant, balançant le feston et l'ourlet;

Agile et noble, avec sa jambe de statue.
Moi, je buvais, crispé comme un extravagant,
Dans son oeil, ciel livide où germe l'ouragan,
La douceur qui fascine et le plaisir qui tue.

Un éclair... puis la nuit! — Fugitive beauté
Dont le regard m'a fait soudainement renaître,
Ne te verrai-je plus que dans l'éternité?

Ailleurs, bien loin d'ici! trop tard! jamais peut-être!
Car j'ignore où tu fuis, tu ne sais où je vais,
Ô toi que j'eusse aimée, ô toi qui le savais!

A couple of different translations:

To a Passer-By

The street about me roared with a deafening sound.
Tall, slender, in heavy mourning, majestic grief,
A woman passed, with a glittering hand
Raising, swinging the hem and flounces of her skirt;

Agile and graceful, her leg was like a statue's.
Tense as in a delirium, I drank
From her eyes, pale sky where tempests germinate,
The sweetness that enthralls and the pleasure that kills.

A lightning flash... then night! Fleeting beauty
By whose glance I was suddenly reborn,
Will I see you no more before eternity?

Elsewhere, far, far from here! too late! never perhaps!
For I know not where you fled, you know not where I go,
O you whom I would have loved, O you who knew it!

— William Aggeler, The Flowers of Evil (Fresno, CA: Academy Library Guild, 1954)

A Passer-by

The deafening street roared on. Full, slim, and grand
In mourning and majestic grief, passed down
A woman, lifting with a stately hand
And swaying the black borders of her gown;

Noble and swift, her leg with statues matching;
I drank, convulsed, out of her pensive eye,
A livid sky where hurricanes were hatching,
Sweetness that charms, and joy that makes one die.

A lighting-flash — then darkness! Fleeting chance
Whose look was my rebirth — a single glance!
Through endless time shall I not meet with you?

Far off! too late! or never! — I not knowing
Who you may be, nor you where I am going —
You, whom I might have loved, who know it too!

— Roy Campbell, Poems of Baudelaire (New York: Pantheon Books, 1952)

Walter Benjamin wrote a lot about this concept of the flâneur, the figure strolling the streets with a certain kind of attention, a certain kind of seeing that, in that one moment, sees the other person, and believes there is an empathy there, a true and wonderful connection - (but this is entirely manufactured in the mind of the seer).


message 18: by Fionnuala (last edited Mar 27, 2013 01:25AM) (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments Karen wrote: "...Walter Benjamin wrote a lot about this concept of the flâneur, the figure strolling the streets with a certain kind of attention, a certain kind of seeing that, in that one moment, sees the other person, and believes there is an empathy there, a true and wonderful connection - (but this is entirely manufactured in the mind of the seer)"

Karen, you've anticipated what the narrator feels about the girl on the bridge a few pages further on, the desire to find an empathy in the eyes of the other person rather than simply his own reflection.
I'm still puzzling over the meaning of the three trees he sees from the carriage. Are we meant to understand their significance now or is it for later?
As it is Easter time, and I've been a bit preoccupied with that theme since writing my review of Du Côté around it, I can't help seeing three crosses, and when he says that leaving them behind was like breaking faith with the memory of a friend or denying a god, I can't help thinking of Simon Peter and his three denials of his friend, Jesus.
I've noticed that Proust uses biblical references from time to time but he hides them very well, disguises them in art or mythology. There has probably been a book or a paper written about this....


message 19: by Marcus (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments Marcelita wrote: "One of my favorite reading weeks.
I will leave "the trees" for another, but the echo of something "lost" for the narrator, on this carriage ride, was "found" for Monet, in a neighboring seaside to..."


thank you Marcelita for all this wonderful material and yes the NPR report from Honfleur was indeed a treat


·Karen· (kmoll) | 318 comments It's odd how we pick up different things. Now that you mention it, I see rebirth in Baudelaire's poem too - renaître - but what struck me in that scene with the girl on the bridge were the less-than-subtle sexual overtones. Lots of penetration, enter, 'prise de force', possession........


message 21: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
@Karen, thank you for the Baudelaire poem and Benjamin's examination of the theme... One of the books I want to read soon isLa Folie Baudelaire, being a fan of this poet since my teens!!!.

I should reread that whole passage in Proust again.

@Fionnuala, I liked the association of the three trees with the three crosses. I have picked up more references to the Old Testament than to the New. I had associated the three trees with the three "clochers" from Martinville, from the Combray section... they were described as "trois fleurs peintes sur le ciel" , but now I realize that those too can be associated to the three crosses.


message 22: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Marcelita wrote: "One of my favorite reading weeks.
I will leave "the trees" for another, but the echo of something "lost" for the narrator, on this carriage ride, was "found" for Monet, in a neighboring seaside to..."


Thank you for reminding us of Boudin, Marcelita. In the Thyssen exhibit mentioned above there were a few of his paintings, given the whole theme of landscape and open air. There was also a "pas mal" of Courbets, which I found astounding.

The Thyssen collection has a five of his painting, and I will link their page because they provide an individual "fiche" per painting.

I am feeling the itches to travel to France soon.

http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thysse...


message 23: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments I did notice those sexual overrtones, Karen, but in the end it seemed that it was finding empathy in her eyes that was the most important thing to him.

Kalliope, yes, the steeples of Martinville are clearly being recalled in the way the trees change place as the narrator's position changes but I just thought there might be something more intended but perhaps it is simply that image of things changing their position as we change our point of view that Proust is going to use throughout A la Recherche and that it alone is the reference intended here.


message 24: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Fionnuala wrote: "I did notice those sexual overrtones, Karen, but in the end it seemed that it was finding empathy in her eyes that was the most important thing to him.

Kalliope, yes, the steeples of Martinville a..."


Well, I now think that both, the 3 "clochers" are being recalled, but also the 3 crosses are behind this image... We can expect to encounter them again...


message 25: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
..elle-même (grand-mère), soutenue par le souffle céleste, restait calme et souriante comme Sainte Blandine".

I found this modern étampe in which Blandine has the benevolent smile (not always!)




But nicer version in stained glass form:





message 26: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments Kalliope wrote: "Well, I now think that both, the 3 "clochers" are being recalled, but also the 3 crosses are behind this image... We can expect to encounter them again...
"


It's wonderful, isn't it, that we have reached a point where we are able to spot the repeated themes and are better able to tease out the underlying pattern of the entire work - it's got to make, what otherwise might be a daunting journey, a little easier and a lot more interesting...


message 27: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala | 1142 comments Great illustrations, Kalliope. My notes say that Sainte Blandine, tortured in 177 for her faith, apparently showed no sign of suffering but only answered calmly, "Je suis chrétienne, il ne se commet aucun crime parmi nous."
There are such amazing stories about the early christian women martyrs. As Proust must have, I also heard many stories from the lives of the saints at my convent primary school and they have a powerful effect on small children.


message 28: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Fionnuala wrote: "Great illustrations, Kalliope. My notes say that Sainte Blandine, tortured in 177 for her faith, apparently showed no sign of suffering but only answered calmly, "Je suis chrétienne, il ne se comme..."

Yes, the Sainte Blandine was a Martyr, and in the images she appears with lions... I was not familiar with this particular Saint. I think it is very interesting to see how Proust was so attentive to everything and stored so many images and words in his head that he could later on come up with all sorts of associations in the least expected ways.. and with this one he remembered her expression so clearly from images he had seen presumably as a child.


message 29: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
(comme on montre le Shah de Perse ou la Reine Ranavalo à un spectateur obscur qui ne peut évidemment avoir aucune relation avec le puissant souverain, mais peut trouver intéressant de l'avoir vu à quelques pas)...

Queen Ranavalo, the last Queen of Madagascar:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranavalo...




Le Journal de Paris: Arrivée de la Reine Ranavalo à Paris.




Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments Kalliope wrote: "Fionnuala wrote: "Great illustrations, Kalliope. My notes say that Sainte Blandine, tortured in 177 for her faith, apparently showed no sign of suffering but only answered calmly, "Je suis chrétien..."

"I think it is very interesting to see how Proust was so attentive to everything and stored so many images and words in his head that he could later on come up with all sorts of associations in the least expected ways."

I think Anka Muhlstein has the answer: "Proust’s friends claimed that he had read everything and forgot nothing."
http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/20...


message 31: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Marcelita wrote: "Kalliope wrote: "Fionnuala wrote: "Great illustrations, Kalliope. My notes say that Sainte Blandine, tortured in 177 for her faith, apparently showed no sign of suffering but only answered calmly, ..."

Yes, although I was not too impressed by Muhlstein's book. I wrote a review on it, and my sense is that by the time we finish with the entire work by Proust, I will feel even less pleased with it.


Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments Kalliope wrote: "(comme on montre le Shah de Perse ou la Reine Ranavalo à un spectateur obscur qui ne peut évidemment avoir aucune relation avec le puissant souverain, mais peut trouver intéressant de l'avoir vu à ..."

Queen Ranavalo, the last Queen of Madagascar? Sainte Blandine?
Ah, there is always something overlooked in previous readings, which is why Proust always seems fresh to my eyes.

I adore the images...but sometimes have difficulty posting them. What is your trick?


message 33: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Marcelita wrote: "Kalliope wrote: "(comme on montre le Shah de Perse ou la Reine Ranavalo à un spectateur obscur qui ne peut évidemment avoir aucune relation avec le puissant souverain, mais peut trouver intéressant..."

In a mac is harder... I normally use Safari but for the images I have to use Firefox.. and when you have the image you like you do the following:

Click on it.
Go to Tools
There go down to Page Info
There click the Tab Media
Then scroll down until you get the image you like.
You drag it to this window text and frame it with the HTML instructions posted.

Beginning of frame: [image error]

In a PC it is much easier, since with the right button of the mouse you can find the "copy URL"

There may be a better way, but this is what I found..

Happy image posting...!!


message 34: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (last edited Mar 27, 2013 06:10AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
And now the reference on Assuérus and Esther,-- is not just directly from the Bible, but from Racine's version of it. So far he has been mentioning only Phèdre (I think).

"Faut-il de mes 'Etats vous donner la moitié?

Act II, Scene 7.


message 35: by Marcus (last edited Mar 27, 2013 09:51AM) (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments Wondering about a link between dining room descriptions of the various characters and cliques in the Grand Hotel and those in dining room of the sanitorium Hans Castorp goes to in Mann's Magic Mountain. Both written at a similar time, Castorp and the Narrator both go to their 'hotels' for a health cure, the sea at Balbec has mountainous qualities and, if i remember rightly, there is a flag system that warns 'guests' not to go into the mountains in Switzerland, similar to the red flag on the beach at Balbec...is there anything in this or is it just fanciful?


message 36: by Marcus (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments Cardinal La Balue's cage...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/seriykot...


message 37: by Jocelyne (last edited Mar 27, 2013 10:48AM) (new) - added it

Jocelyne Lebon | 745 comments Jaye, Could it be that Proust's lush and vivid prose makes your longing for the sea even keener?


message 38: by Jocelyne (new) - added it

Jocelyne Lebon | 745 comments Amelia wrote: "Jaye I am in New England and the dreary winter is getting to me. My favorite passage of this week is when he said, "... I returned to the window to have another look at the vast, dazzling, mountai..."

I am in California and there is not a snowflake on the ground, but I can assure you that the beautiful Pacific ocean through my eyes does not even come close to Proust's vision of the sea at Balbec. His descriptions are so rich that even I long for the sea!


message 39: by Jocelyne (new) - added it

Jocelyne Lebon | 745 comments Martin wrote: "We have a little more of that multi-layered narrative Elizabeth mentioned:

“Mistake my poor chick’s knocking for anyone else! Why, Granny could tell it among a thousand! Do you suppose there’s any..."


Indeed! One can really feel his grandmother's being torn by her desire to protect him and her irritation. I found this whole passage rather poignant.


Richard Magahiz (milkfish) | 111 comments
Alas, that wind from the sea; an hour later, in the great dining-room — while we were having our luncheon, and from the leathern gourd of a lemon were sprinkling a few golden drops on to a pair of soles which presently left on our plates the plumes of their picked skeletons, curled like stiff feathers and resonant as citherns,— it seemed to my grandmother a cruel deprivation not to be able to feel its life-giving breath on her cheek, on account of the window, transparent but closed, which like the front of a glass case in a museum divided us from the beach while allowing us to look out upon its whole extent, and into which the sky entered so completely that its azure had the effect of being the colour of the windows and its white clouds only so many flaws in the glass.


The sea as seen from the Grand Hotel at Cabourg (Balbec)



The photoset of which this is a part Sur le pas de Marcel Proust has a number of images relating to this week's reading, including a meal of sole!


message 41: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "Alas, that wind from the sea; an hour later, in the great dining-room — while we were having our luncheon, and from the leathern gourd of a lemon were sprinkling a few golden drops on to a pair of ..."

This is perfect.. with the glass that he describes and how it becomes a painting...


message 42: by Marcus (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments Richard wrote: "Alas, that wind from the sea; an hour later, in the great dining-room — while we were having our luncheon, and from the leathern gourd of a lemon were sprinkling a few golden drops on to a pair of ..."

totally fantastic Richard - a drop of lemon got into my eye!


message 43: by Marcus (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments loved the extended joke about Francoise which ended with: "So what it amounted to was that we could no longer have any hot water because Francoise had become a friend of the person who heated it."


message 44: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (goodreadscompatricia2) | 370 comments Thank Kall and Marcelita for the wonderful pictures and links. I start surfing the web like there´s no tomorrow.


message 45: by Jocelyne (new) - added it

Jocelyne Lebon | 745 comments Marcus wrote: "loved the extended joke about Francoise which ended with: "So what it amounted to was that we could no longer have any hot water because Francoise had become a friend of the person who heated it.""

I got a chuckle out of that one too. Françoise definitely has my vote as best supporting actress. I am starting to wonder if she is not one of the most well-drawn characters; the more I read the more she is further defined,refined and highlighted. Everytime she comes onto the scene Proust unveils yet another facet of her. I love her.


message 46: by Marcus (new) - added it

Marcus | 143 comments Jocelyne wrote: "Marcus wrote: "loved the extended joke about Francoise which ended with: "So what it amounted to was that we could no longer have any hot water because Francoise had become a friend of the person w..."

as you know Jocelyne, me too! Maybe her appeal is also that she's highly individualistic - the narrator's family had, he says, "...so nearly succeeded in taming her..." which is tantamount to an admission that they has failed and had given up the hopeless task.


message 47: by Kalliope, Priestess of Proust (last edited Mar 27, 2013 01:36PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kalliope | 2929 comments Mod
Patricia wrote: "More Faber-Castells-N°2=HB-pencil scribbled on the margin of the Budding Girls text:

If you read the opposite of what P says about Bergotte you´ll find exactly Proust´s "Ars Poetica" i.e. what P t..."


Patricia, as one of the Moderators, I would advice you to move this post to the corresponding week thread. It is better if we discuss the appropriate section in the right place, otherwise things could get very muddled up.

Thank you.


Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments Kalliope wrote: "Richard wrote: "Alas, that wind from the sea; an hour later, in the great dining-room — while we were having our luncheon, and from the leathern gourd of a lemon were sprinkling a few golden drops ..."

I believe that Yvette Gauthier has taken photographs of almost everything related to Proust. There are so many "sets" that I have lost hours, rather like the narrator reading in the garden, pouring over each image. Be careful...
https://secure.flickr.com/photos/5136...


message 49: by Marcelita (last edited Mar 27, 2013 09:34PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Marcelita Swann | 1135 comments Marcus wrote: "Jocelyne wrote: "Marcus wrote: "loved the extended joke about Francoise which ended with: "So what it amounted to was that we could no longer have any hot water because Francoise had become a frien..."

Marcus and Jocelyne, I agree! Francoise, from the first pages, seems carved...high relief...with both her "vices and virures" visible immediately.

Imaginatively combining Ernestine Gallou, who "ruled over"* the Aimot's household for 30 years, Céline Cottin, who was his cook before Céleste arrived, Céleste herself...and his thoughts on Old France, the war, cruelty, the servant class, the value of money, etc., Proust was able to create our Françoise. (*from Bill Carter's biography, p. 26)

Later in Sodom and Gomorrah, we will meet two messenger girls in Balbec- based on Céleste Albaret and her sister, Marie Gineste. It's a loving tribute.


Richard Magahiz (milkfish) | 111 comments
...only here it was those hills of the sea which, before they come dancing back towards us, are apt to retire so far that often it was only at the end of a long and sandy plain that I would distinguish, miles it seemed away, their first undulations upon a background transparent, vaporous, bluish, like the glaciers that one sees in the backgrounds of the Tuscan Primitives.


I spent a while (longer than I should have) searching around trying to find one of these paintings by Giotto or Cimabue or one of the others which featured a glacier, but came up empty.


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