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Nonfiction > Executive Summaries of New Popular Non Fiction Books. This Week: 'Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt' by Michael Lewis

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message 1: by Aaron (last edited Oct 17, 2012 05:24AM) (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Hiya. I run a website dedicated to new and popular non-fiction books. Specifically, I write executive summaries and produce podcast discussions of brand new, top selling non-fiction and science-based books (a new one every two weeks). I'm at:

http://newbooksinbrief.com/

Cheers,
Aaron


message 2: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading Paul Tough's new book called 'How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character'. The book explores the character traits that lead to success, and how we can cultivate them in young people. It's a game changer. I've written an executive summary of the book available here:

http://newbooksinbrief.wordpress.com/...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 3: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading 'The Chemistry Between Us: Love, Sex, and the Science of Attraction' by Larry Young. The book explores the biology and chemistry of everything from gender identity (and sexual orientation) to love (and parenting) to monogamy (and infidelity), taking us inside our bodies to investigate the genes and hormones that influence our approach to love, sex and relationships. The book is very illuminating (and advances the most interesting theory that I have ever encountered regarding why the male phallus and female breasts are both so large). I've written an executive summary of the book available here:

http://newbooksinbrief.wordpress.com/...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 4: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the New York Times bestseller 'The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail--but Some Don't' by Nate Silver. The book explores the factors that complicate forecasting across many fields, with a focus on the economy. The book also delves into the subtle things that can be done to make us better predictors. It's superb. I've written a full executive summary of the book here:

http://newbooksinbrief.com/2012/10/15...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 5: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading George Church's new book called Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves. The book tracks the evolution of genomics and genetic engineering (now called synthetic biology), and explores current and upcoming developments and technologies in biotech from biomaterials to bioenergy to biomedicine. The book is invigorating and inspiring. I've written a full executive summary of the book at:
http://newbooksinbrief.com/2012/10/30...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 6: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading Thinking, Fast and Slow by the grandfather of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman. The book breaks down thinking into two systems: intuition and deliberation, and explores their interaction. The main argument of the book is that intuitive thinking often misleads us, and that it is important to know the many ways that it does so in order that we may catch the errors. Very interesting and useful stuff. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2012/11/13...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 7: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading Ray Kurzweil's new book How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed. The book charts the progress of artificial intelligence, and points up how these machines are already operating according to the same principles as our brains. As our understanding of the brain continues to advance, Kurzweil argues, we will be able to use this knowledge to build machines that are ever more human-like--until, eventually, our machines will achieve human-level intelligence, and beyond. The book is inspiring and daunting all at once. I've written an executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2012/11/27...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 8: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Nassim Nicholas Taleb called Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder. Taleb makes the case that complex systems (including the body, technology, businesses, the economy, politics etc.) benefit when they are allowed to unfold organically and with a measure of randomness, as opposed to being designed in a top-down, formulaic way (though it is the spirit of the age to think otherwise). It’s a very intriguing point of view. I’ve written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2012/12/17...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 9: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading Jared Diamond's new book The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?. The book explores our traditional way of life (prior to the onset of civilization) and makes the argument that though civilization does bring it with it many important benefits, there are several areas wherein traditional practices represent an improvement over how we do things in the modern world, and that these practices could (and should) be incorporated into our modern way of life (both at the personal and societal level). The areas include conflict resolution, child care, treatment of the elderly, approaching risk and health. The book is very illuminating. I've written a full executive summary of it available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/01/15...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 10: by Robert (new)

Robert Lee | 2 comments Until February 15, this e-book is available for free on www.smashwords.com. Just search for the book title and enter the Coupon Code LK22H.
"The Last Drop of Living: A Minimalist's Guide to Living the High Life on a Low Budget" offers a unique perspective on the concept that minimalism requires self-denial and deprivation. Indeed, after reading this book, you undoubtedly will be inspired to adopt this simple, yet elegant way of experiencing life.
Minimal living is not about doing without. It is about savouring everything greedily, while walking gently through your world.
This book opens up an exciting doorway into getting the most out of your life, your way, with a 15-step guide to "going minimal." Packed with anecdotes and often humourous incidents, The Last Drop of Living is not only a pleasurable reading experience, but a roadmap to a fulfilling way to decrease the commonplace stresses in your life.
Bonus chapters on yurts, barebones business, wildcrafting, energy simplicity, sustainability and minimalist vacation options provide extraordinary value beyond the invigorating discussions on minimalist strategies. Also, the revised edition features a new chapter, Maximizing Your Money.
Tnx & enjoy.
Bob


message 11: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Maria Konnikova called Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes. The author makes the case that Holmes brings the scientific method and scientific thinking to everyday life, and aims to help us do the same. It's self-help for the scientifically minded, and its backed up by the latest in psychological research. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/01/28...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 12: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Al Gore called The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change. The six main drivers of change that Gore identifies are: 1) Automation in the new global economy; 2)The shifting of power from nation-states to multinational corporations; 3) The Internet-ization of everyone and everything ; 4) The biotechnology revolution; 5) The depletion of the world's resources due to population increase and unsustainable consumption; and 6) Climate change. The book is very interesting. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/02/12...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 13: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Chip Walter called Last Ape Standing: The Seven-Million-Year Story of How and Why We Survived. The book makes use of the latest fossil finds and DNA analysis to chart the evolution of our species from chimp to the present. It's an excellent account of our evolutionary story. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/02/26...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 14: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier called Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think. The book traces the history, present and future of big data, and argues that the phenomenon will transform our world. It's a good overview of an interesting and important topic. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/03/21...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 15: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Jonah Berger called Contagious: Why Things Catch On. The book explores social pandemics and brings a scientific approach to understanding why things go viral. It's a fun and interesting read about an intriguing topic. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/04/03...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 16: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Michael Moss called Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us. The book explores the history and practices of the processed food industry. It’s an eye-opening look at just what goes into our food (and why), and how this is contributing to some of our most common and serious health issues, like obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even some types of cancer. I’ve written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/04/17...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 17: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Ramez Naam called The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet. The book explores our current resource shortages and environmental problems, and argues that the power of innovation is equal to the task of overcoming them--based on the history (and present) of innovation, as well as a theoretical understanding of what drives it. It's a brilliant book, and has gone straight into my top 10 of all time. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/04/30...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 18: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished the new book by Google big wigs Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen called The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business. The authors prognosticate on how digital technology will impact everything from the domestic sphere; to government and international relations and conflicts; to the developing world (where 5 billion people are expected to come online in the next 20 years). The authors have some very interesting perspectives on how the digital age will play out. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/05/23...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 19: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished the new book by Jaron Lanier called Who Owns the Future? The book focuses on the information economy, and argues that the Internet is creating a system of winners (the major Internet companies), and losers (the ordinary people who freely provide the content and data that is being used by the Internet companies to create mega-profits). In order to preserve a middle-class going forward--as the information economy comes to represent an ever greater proportion of the economy as a whole--Lanier argues we must monetize information, and pay ordinary people for the contributions they make to the Internet. An interesting idea. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/06/05...


message 20: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Adam Rutherford called Creation: How Science Is Reinventing Life Itself. The book looks at the latest research in genetics and focuses on 2 topics in particular: the quest to understand how life originated in the first place; and the burgeoning field of synthetic biology (the effort to turn genetic manipulation into an engineering science). The book is well-written and highly informative. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/07/10...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 21: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Ben Way called Jobocalypse: The End of Human Jobs and How Robots Will Replace Them. The book explores the present and future of robotics and its impact on the economy, and argues that automated technology will come to increasingly usurp jobs from us humans (as well as what we can do about this). It's a fun and very interesting read. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/07/24...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 22: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Jeff Stibel called Breakpoint: Why the Web will Implode, Search will be Obsolete, and Everything Else you Need to Know about Technology is in Your Brain. The book is about networks, and how networks evolve; and it focuses on the internet (which is one enormous network). Stibel argues that the internet is still in the early phases of its evolution, and that based on how other similar networks evolve (such as the ant colony and the human brain), we can expect some big big changes out of the internet in the coming years (including the development of real intelligence and consciousness). This was an extremely interesting read. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/08/07...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 23: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by David Epstein called The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance. The book explores how genes and environment interact at every step of the way in the development of elite athletes. This is without a doubt one of the best books I've read all year, and I highly recommend it. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/08/21...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 24: by Jane (new)

Jane (janeap) Aaron wrote: "Hiya. I run a website dedicated to new and popular non-fiction books. Specifically, I write executive summaries and produce podcast discussions of brand new, top selling non-fiction and science-bas..."

Thank you, Aaron, for hosting your site and for telling us nonfiction types about it.
Cordially,
Jane Allen Petrick


message 25: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Amanda Ripley called The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way. The book explores the education systems of 3 countries that perform very well on international tests: South Korea, Finland and Poland (with the aim of helping America find a way out of its education woes). Some very interesting insights here. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/09/12...


message 26: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by William Eggers called The Solution Revolution: How Business, Government, and Social Enterprises Are Teaming Up to Solve Society's Toughest Problems. The book explores how businesses have recently joined governments and non-profits in addressing public goods and social goals. It's an interesting discussion about an important and timely topic--though the reading experience leaves much to be desired. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/10/08...


message 27: by Humberto (new)

Humberto Contreras | 66 comments There are 3 threads?


message 28: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Malcolm Gladwell called David and Goliath. The book explores the curious nature of advantages and disadvantages and how each can (under circumstances) become its opposite. Gladwell gets bogged down in his anecdotes at times, and his arguments are occasionally overly-simplistic (as usual), but there’s plenty of interest here to keep you going. I’ve written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/10/22...


message 29: by Vanessa Eden (new)

Vanessa  Eden Patton (vanessaeden) | 509 comments this is annoying it popped up 3 times in my alerts.


message 30: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Uri Gneezy and John A. List called The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and The Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life. The authors have become famous for applying controlled field experiments to everything from education, to charity, to business, to healthy living, to discrimination etc. and in this book they update us on their experiments and results. The book is a fun and very interesting read. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/11/05...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 31: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Howard G. Buffet called 40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World. Buffet draws on his 25+ years of humanitarian and philanthropy work (and 30+ years in farming) to detail what does and does not work in the effort to fight global poverty and hunger. This is a very enlightening look at the fight against hunger, and a must read for anyone interested in making the world a better place for everyone. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/11/19...


message 32: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Charles Montgomery called Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design. Montgomery takes us through the history of the modern city, and argues in favor of the new urbanist movement in design--which advocates moving away from suburban sprawl and towards mixed-use, multi-income communities; laced with parks and plazas of varying sizes; and tied together with transportation networks that reintroduce walking, cycling and public transport as real options. The book is fantastic, and a great introduction to the ideas of the new urbanists. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2013/12/17...


message 33: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished the new book by Dan Hurley called Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power. The book gets past the hype of the brain-boosting industry, and explores the actual science on which it is based. Many types of interventions are explored, from brain-training exercises and activities (including meditation), to physical exercise, to diet, pills and even zapping the brain with electrodes (a la transcranial direct-current stimulation, tDCS). A timely look at a very interesting topic. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/01/14...


message 34: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Erik Brynjolfsson called The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies. The book charts the rise of digital technology and how it contributes greatly to economic productivity (but also how it contributes to the growing gap between the rich and the rest). Brynjolfsson also offers up some recommendations on how the increasing inequality of the second machine age may be mitigated. It's a very insightful look into digital technology and its consequences. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/01/28...


message 35: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Mckenzie Funk called Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming. The book explores all the ways people are profiting off climate change (which partly helps explain why we're not doing much to stop it). A very interesting book on the most important environmental issue of our age. I've written a full executive summary available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/02/11...


message 36: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished the new book by Alex Pentland called Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread— The Lessons from a New Science. Pentland addresses how digital sensors and big data are revolutionizing the social sciences. This includes Pentland's own work, which focuses on the importance of social learning, and how creativity and productivity are generated in individuals, groups and cities. It's a fascinating look at an up-and-coming science. A full executive summary of the book is available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/02/25...


message 37: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading the new book by Michio Kaku called The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind. Kaku explores the advances that have occurred in neuroscience since the brain-imaging revolution of the 1990s; and also details the advances that are to come (including telepathy, telekinesis, uploading and downloading memories, and AI). It's a fascinating discussion of one of the final frontiers of science. I've written an executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/03/11...


message 38: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 81 comments Just finished reading Michael Lewis' new book Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. Lewis reports on how Brad Katsuyama (a broker from RBC) uncovered a massive (and legal, for now) scam on Wall Street made possible by high-frequency trading. Katsuyama has now started a new type of stock exchange in New York (called the IEX--it opened in October, 2013) with the hopes of eliminating the scamming--and Lewis reports on the progress of the new stock exchange as well. This is an incredible story, and an incredible book that I predict will win the Pulitzer Prize. I've written a full executive summary of the book available here: http://newbooksinbrief.com/2014/04/15...


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