Today I have Charlie Cochrane guest blogging with me. She’s here to give some good advice to aspiring authors and let you know about her book In the Spotlight. Welcome, Charlie.

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Does anyone else have a problem with keeping their trap shut? The sort of problem that means you end up volunteering for stuff you didn’t quite intend volunteering for? That’s just happened to me. Yet again. And it all started so innocently.

You see, I was congratulating an acquaintance on her success with self-publishing a book of poetry via print on demand. Had she considered an e-book version, via Smashwords or Amazon, I enquired. No, she hadn’t, so we had a useful conversation about how easy it was to do produce such a product. At which point she asked me how I knew such things…and I had to confess.

It’s a fairly open secret locally that I’m published, not least because I often use my author social media accounts to communicate with family and friends, so I was slightly surprised this acquaintance didn’t know, although that wasn’t an issue. Her next question surprised me, though – would I come and talk to the local writers’ group? I’ve spoken to writers’ groups before, but never so close to home and, of course, I couldn’t refuse.

So wish me luck while they grill me and I try not to bore them. I shall, naturally, share the only bits of advice I ever give other writers. And you get a sneak preview…

First, there are only two rules. Number one is you must do what you said you’d do when you said you’d do it by and follow publishers’ submissions guidelines to the letter. Otherwise all the rules you see bandied about concerning how to write or edit or promo or whatever are just ideas. They may work for one person but may not work for you.

The second is that, if you want to be published, you can’t be unless you finish a book and submit it. You have no idea how many prospective authors fall at one of those two fences.



Blurb:
In the Spotlight: Two stories by Charlie Cochrane

All That Jazz
Francis Yardley may be the high kicking star of an all-male version of Chicago, but bitter, and on the booze after the breakdown of a relationship, he thinks that the chance for true love has passed him by. A handsome, shy rugby player called Tommy seems to be the answer to his problems, but Tommy doesn't like the lipstick and lace. Can they find a way forward and is there still a chance for happiness "nowadays"?

If Music Be
Rick Cowley finds himself taking up am-dram once more, thinking it’ll help him get over the death of his partner. He’d never anticipated it would mean an encounter with an old flame and the sort of emotional complications the Bard would have revelled in. Still, old Will had the right word for every situation, didn’t he?

Links: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06X9FS84C
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06X9FS84C

Bio: Because Charlie Cochrane couldn't be trusted to do any of her jobs of choice—like managing a rugby team—she writes. Her mystery novels include the Edwardian era Cambridge Fellows series, and the contemporary Lindenshaw Mysteries. Multi-published, she has titles with Carina, Riptide, Lethe and Bold Strokes, among others.

A member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, Mystery People and International Thriller Writers Inc, Charlie regularly appears at literary festivals and at reader and author conferences with The Deadly Dames.

Social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/charlie.coch...
Twitter: http://twitter.com/charliecochrane
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show...
Blogs: http://charlie-cochrane.dreamwidth.org/ and https://charliecochrane.wordpress.com/
Website: http://www.charliecochrane.co.uk
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Published on March 25, 2017 06:24 • 305 views • Tags: charlie-cochrane, in-the-spotlight, romance, writing-advice
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message 1: by Charlie (new)

Charlie Cochrane Thanks for hosting me!


message 2: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Richards Charlie wrote: "Thanks for hosting me!"
My pleasure. You're always welcome, Charlie.


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