Ray   Robinson

James Lark
371 books | 73 friends

seak
2,118 books | 1,879 friends

Clive J...
1 book | 2,168 friends

Billy O...
234 books | 1,272 friends

Andrea
2,359 books | 664 friends

Simon
929 books | 4,436 friends

Kathryn
1,115 books | 460 friends

Mitzi S...
111 books | 2,771 friends

More friends…

Ray Robinson

Goodreads Author


Born
Northallerton, The United Kingdom
Website

Genre

Member Since
October 2007


Robinson first won attention in 2006 with his debut novel, Electricity. It was shortlisted for both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Authors' Club First Novel Award. The film adaptation of Electricity, starring Agyness Deyn, Tom Georgeson, and Christian Cooke, made its world premiere at the BFI London Film Festival 2014, and won Best Screenplay at the National Film Awards 2015.

Robinson's other novels are The Man Without (2008), Forgetting Zoe (2010), and Jawbone Lake (2014).

Forgetting Zoe was a winner of the inaugural Jerwood Fiction Uncovered prize and was the Observer's 'Thriller of the Month'. Robinson was hailed as 'among the most impressive voices of Britain's younger generation' by the Irish Times, and the Irish Independen
...more

Average rating: 3.53 · 433 ratings · 57 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Electricity

3.67 avg rating — 207 ratings — published 2006 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Forgetting Zoë

3.43 avg rating — 119 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Jawbone Lake

3.27 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Man Without

3.51 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2008 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Cut

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Ray Robinson…

Ray Robinson hasn't written any blog posts yet.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Ray’s Recent Updates

Ray Robinson is now friends with Edmund Bealby-wright
6052041
Ray Robinson and 1 other person liked Kim's review of Forgetting Zoë:
Forgetting Zoë by Ray   Robinson
"Thought this was a great story. 10-year-old Zoe is kidnapped by Thurman and kept prisoner in a disused nuclear bunker at his isolated Arizona farm. The characterisation is great as first of all you are introduced to Thurman as a child and his relatio" Read more of this review »
Drug by Lynda O'Rourke
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ray Robinson is now following
130651
Ray Robinson shared a quote
Forgetting Zoë by Ray   Robinson
“She opened the window and peered out, the town on Klibo softly illuminated on the distant headland. She eyed the black stretch of water separating the islands and wondered whether her father was hunting out there below the waves.
Later, a summer storm raged against the island and it felt like the cottage was at sea, an east wind goldering around the clapboard houses like a gang of vandals carrying blades. It tore through the harbor, smashing and riving, flinging doors hundreds of feet into the air. Zoë heard it wolf-whistling between the eaves and imagined Ingrid and Einar embracing.”
Ray Robinson
Ray Robinson shared a quote
The Man Without by Ray   Robinson
“ANTONY REMEMBERED Val’s kids being taken away, one after the other.
Mikey, Barry, Lily.
Lily was the last to go. She was only a few years older than Antony, but when he screwed his eyes up tight and tried to remember her face, he couldn’t. He remembered the nickname she’d given him though: Spug. Because he loved birds so much.
Her scratchy voice, full of wires and string. Her screams before she started to fit, that cacophony of vowels and white noise. Little Spuggy. Sparrow boy. Lily. Feral fitting girl. The pissy smell of her. He remembered how terrifying it was seeing her hurly-burly. That unmistakeable sound, a liquid hollow sound, of a human skull hitting the concrete. Her body churning, shambling, gyrating – how life would take a sudden detour. Like there was some enormous struggle going on inside her body and she always lost the fight.
She didn’t have epilepsy; it had her.
— Little Spug.
The day she was taken away. The jealousy he felt.
Lily had escaped.”
Ray Robinson
Ray Robinson is now following
696572
Ray Robinson is accepting questions on their profile page.
More of Ray's books…
“She opened the window and peered out, the town on Klibo softly illuminated on the distant headland. She eyed the black stretch of water separating the islands and wondered whether her father was hunting out there below the waves.
Later, a summer storm raged against the island and it felt like the cottage was at sea, an east wind goldering around the clapboard houses like a gang of vandals carrying blades. It tore through the harbor, smashing and riving, flinging doors hundreds of feet into the air. Zoë heard it wolf-whistling between the eaves and imagined Ingrid and Einar embracing.”
Ray Robinson, Forgetting Zoë

“ANTONY REMEMBERED Val’s kids being taken away, one after the other.
Mikey, Barry, Lily.
Lily was the last to go. She was only a few years older than Antony, but when he screwed his eyes up tight and tried to remember her face, he couldn’t. He remembered the nickname she’d given him though: Spug. Because he loved birds so much.
Her scratchy voice, full of wires and string. Her screams before she started to fit, that cacophony of vowels and white noise. Little Spuggy. Sparrow boy. Lily. Feral fitting girl. The pissy smell of her. He remembered how terrifying it was seeing her hurly-burly. That unmistakeable sound, a liquid hollow sound, of a human skull hitting the concrete. Her body churning, shambling, gyrating – how life would take a sudden detour. Like there was some enormous struggle going on inside her body and she always lost the fight.
She didn’t have epilepsy; it had her.
— Little Spug.
The day she was taken away. The jealousy he felt.
Lily had escaped.”
Ray Robinson, The Man Without

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Books2Movies Club: 2014 - Currently Across the World 15 108 Dec 10, 2014 12:36PM  
“ANTONY REMEMBERED Val’s kids being taken away, one after the other.
Mikey, Barry, Lily.
Lily was the last to go. She was only a few years older than Antony, but when he screwed his eyes up tight and tried to remember her face, he couldn’t. He remembered the nickname she’d given him though: Spug. Because he loved birds so much.
Her scratchy voice, full of wires and string. Her screams before she started to fit, that cacophony of vowels and white noise. Little Spuggy. Sparrow boy. Lily. Feral fitting girl. The pissy smell of her. He remembered how terrifying it was seeing her hurly-burly. That unmistakeable sound, a liquid hollow sound, of a human skull hitting the concrete. Her body churning, shambling, gyrating – how life would take a sudden detour. Like there was some enormous struggle going on inside her body and she always lost the fight.
She didn’t have epilepsy; it had her.
— Little Spug.
The day she was taken away. The jealousy he felt.
Lily had escaped.”
Ray Robinson, The Man Without

“It pleases him how Spell is how the word is made but also, in the hands of the magician, how the world is changed. One letter separates Word from World, and that letter is like the number one, or an 'I', or a shaft of light between almost closed curtains. There is an old letter called a thorn, which jags and tears at the throat as it's uttered. Later he learns that Grammar and Glamour share the same deeper root, which is further magic, and there can be neither magic without that root, nor plant. He's lost in it like Chid in Child, or God reversed into Dog. Somewhere inside him is a colon. A sentence can last for life.”
Charles Lambert, With a Zero at its Heart

“She opened the window and peered out, the town on Klibo softly illuminated on the distant headland. She eyed the black stretch of water separating the islands and wondered whether her father was hunting out there below the waves.
Later, a summer storm raged against the island and it felt like the cottage was at sea, an east wind goldering around the clapboard houses like a gang of vandals carrying blades. It tore through the harbor, smashing and riving, flinging doors hundreds of feet into the air. Zoë heard it wolf-whistling between the eaves and imagined Ingrid and Einar embracing.”
Ray Robinson, Forgetting Zoë




No comments have been added yet.