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Rina Mae Acosta

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Maria
173 books | 151 friends

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Rina Mae Acosta

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Rina Mae Acosta hasn't written any blog posts yet.

Average rating: 3.7 · 1,877 ratings · 230 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Happiest Kids in the Wo...

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3.71 avg rating — 1,873 ratings — published 2017 — 23 editions
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The Happiest Kids in the Wo...

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“One important lesson is that other people aren’t always the reason for your problems – the cause might lie in yourself, so if you want things to change you should start with yourself.”
Rina Mae Acosta, The Happiest Kids in the World: Bringing up Children the Dutch Way

“Professor Peter Gray "The goal in class, in the minds of the great majority of students, is not competence but good grades"

By focusing primarily on grades and exam results, there's a danger the student will miss out on the other things education has to offer.... Career opportunities and the material things good grades might bring our kids are not the only important things in life.”
Rina Mae Acosta, The Happiest Kids in the World: How Dutch Parents Help Their Kids (and Themselves) by Doing Less

“As with all things in a Dutch childhood, gradual, regulated exposure seems to be the key to progress. There’s less focus on milestones, on children having to be able to do things by a certain age. Instead, parents watch out for indications that a child is ready for a new step and eager to attempt it. It’s the same for potty training and swimming as for cycling: The best progress is made when it is child-led, not parent-pushed.”
Rina Mae Acosta, The Happiest Kids in the World: How Dutch Parents Help Their Kids (and Themselves) by Doing Less




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