Owen Chase



Average rating: 3.92 · 1,482 ratings · 151 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Wreck of the Whaleship ...

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3.90 avg rating — 923 ratings — published 1821 — 33 editions
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Narrative of the Most Extra...

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3.93 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 2013 — 16 editions
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Beneath the Heart of the Se...

3.68 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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The Loss of the Ship Essex,...

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3.99 avg rating — 407 ratings — published 1821 — 4 editions
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1821: Whaleship 'Essex'

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“I have no language to paint the horrors of our situation. To shed tears was indeed altogether unavailing and withal unmanly yet I was not able to deny myself the relief they served to afford me.”
Owen Chase, The Loss of the Ship Essex, Sunk by a Whale

“on the 2nd of october we set sail for the Galapagos Islands. We came to anchor, and laid seven days off Hood’s Island, one of the group; during which time we stopped a leak which we had discovered, and obtained three hundred turtle. We then visited Charles Island, where we procured sixty more. These turtle are a most delicious food, and average in weight generally about one hundred pounds, but many of them weigh upwards of eight hundred. With these, ships usually supply themselves for a great length of time and make a great saving of other provisions. They neither eat nor drink, nor is the least pains taken with them; they are strewed over the deck, thrown underfoot, or packed away in the hold, as it suits convenience. They will live upwards of a year without food or water, but soon die in a cold climate.”
Owen Chase, Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex

“I accordingly turned her over upon the quarter, and was in the act of nailing on the canvass, when I observed a very large spermaceti whale, as well as I could judge, about eighty-five feet in length; he broke water about twenty rods off our weather-bow, and was lying quietly, with his head in a direction for the ship. He spouted two or three times, and then disappeared. In less than two or three seconds he came up again, about the length of the ship off, and made directly for us, at the rate of about three knots. The ship was then going with about the same velocity. His appearance and attitude gave us at first no alarm; but while I stood watching his movements, and observing him but a ship’s length off, com- ing down for us with great celerity, I involuntarily ordered the boy at the helm to put it hard up; intending to sheer off and avoid him. The words were scarcely out of my mouth, before he came down upon us with full speed, and struck the ship with his head, just forward of the fore-chains; he gave us such an appalling and tremendous jar, as nearly threw us all on our faces. The ship brought up as suddenly and violently as if she had struck a rock and trembled for a few seconds like a leaf. We looked at each other with perfect amazement, deprived almost of the power of speech. Many minutes elapsed before we were able to realize the dreadful accident; during which time he passed under the ship, grazing her keel as he went along, came up underside of her to leeward, and lay on the top of the water (apparently stunned with the violence of the blow), for the space of a minute; he then suddenly started off, in a direction to leeward.”
Owen Chase, Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex

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