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G.E.M. Anscombe

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G.E.M. Anscombe


Born
in Limerick, Ireland
March 18, 1919

Died
January 05, 2001

Genre

Influences


Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe, better known as Elizabeth Anscombe, was a British analytic philosopher. A student of Ludwig Wittgenstein, she became an authority on his work, and edited and translated many books drawn from his writings, above all his Philosophical Investigations. She wrote on the philosophy of mind, philosophy of action, philosophical logic, philosophy of language, and ethics. Her 1958 article "Modern Moral Philosophy" introduced the term "consequentialism" into the language of analytic philosophy; this and subsequent articles had a seminal influence on contemporary virtue ethics. Her monograph Intention is generally recognized as her greatest and most influential work, and the continuing philosophical interest in the ...more

Average rating: 4.22 · 19,999 ratings · 630 reviews · 41 distinct worksSimilar authors
Intention

4.02 avg rating — 334 ratings — published 1963 — 11 editions
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An Introduction to Wittgens...

3.95 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 1959 — 9 editions
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Human Life, Action and Ethi...

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4.27 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2005 — 4 editions
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Faith in a Hard Ground: Ess...

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4.25 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Ethics, Religion, And Politics

4.33 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 1981 — 4 editions
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Collected Philosophical Pap...

4.43 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
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From Parmenides to Wittgens...

4.06 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1981 — 4 editions
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Three Philosophers: Aristot...

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3.93 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1961
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From Plato to Wittgenstein:...

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4.15 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Contraception And Chastity

4.55 avg rating — 11 ratings3 editions
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More books by G.E.M. Anscombe…
Quotes by G.E.M. Anscombe  (?)
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“Those who try to make room for sex as mere casual enjoyment pay the penalty: they become shallow. At any rate the talk that reflects and commends this attitude is always shallow. They dishonour their own bodies; holding cheap what is naturally connected with the origination of human life.”
G.E.M. Anscombe, Faith in a Hard Ground: Essays on Religion, Philosophy and Ethics
tags: p-208

“The reckoning what to do or abstain from in particular circumstances will constantly include a reference, implicit or explicit, to generalities. […] Because of it human conduct is not left to be distinguished from the behavior of other animals by the fact that in it calculation is used by which to ascertain the means to perfectly particular ends. The human wants things like health and happiness and science and fair repute and virtue and prosperity, he does not simply want, e.g., that such-and-such a thing should be in such-and-such a place at such-and-such a time.”
G.E.M. Anscombe, The Collected Philosophical Papers Of G. E. M. Anscombe

“The features of Hume's philosophy which I have mentioned, like many other features of it, would incline me to think that Hume was a mere—brilliant—sophost; and his procedures are certainly sophistical. But I am forced, not to reverse, but to add to this judgement by a peculiarity of Hume's philosophizing: namely that, although he reaches his conclusions—with which he is in love—by sophistical methods, his considerations constantly open up very deep and important problems. It is often the case that in the act of exhibiting the sophistry one finds oneself noticing matters which deserve a lot of exploring: the obvious stands in need of investigation as a result of the points that Hume pretends to have made. In this, he is unlike, say, Butler. It was already well-known that conscience could dictate vile actions; for Butler to have written disregarding this does not open up any new topics for us. But with Hume it is otherwise: hence he is a very profound and great philosopher, in spite of his sophistry.”
G.E.M. Anscombe, Human Life, Action and Ethics: Essays

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