Norman Draper

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Norman Draper

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Born
in Atlanta, Georgia, The United States
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Influences
Peter Mayle, Miguel de Cervantes, the Restoration playwrights, daily n ...more

Member Since
August 2013


Norman Draper worked as a reporter for large, medium-size and small newspapers. He has lived in North Carolina, New Hampshire, Colorado, Mississippi and Minnesota. He left journalism in 2011 and worked as an editor for a state agency until 2014.

Norman has been writing fiction for most of his adult life. He's written four novels, the third of which--Backyard--was published in November 2014.The sequel--Front Yard--debuts September 29,2015. Norman is a serious baseball fan, but could never hit so much as a lukewarm heater,though he had a pretty decent glove.

He's also a gardener with just enough knowledge and skill to be dangerous.

Norman especially enjoys wearing his wife's floral print shirts and writing about himself in the third person.

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Norman Draper Write through it. Even if it's crap that winds up on your screen, it keeps your momentum going. Writer's block is not a huge problem for me since I…moreWrite through it. Even if it's crap that winds up on your screen, it keeps your momentum going. Writer's block is not a huge problem for me since I was a newspaper reporter for 35 years. There's no such thing as writer's block on deadline. (less)
Norman Draper I don't really think about it that way. It's something that I'm compelled to do. In a way, I have no control over it. I always wind up sitting at the…moreI don't really think about it that way. It's something that I'm compelled to do. In a way, I have no control over it. I always wind up sitting at the keyboard (or typewriter in the past) hacking away. There are times when I hate it, but I keep doing it anyway. Obsession? Compulsion? Since it's three months until the publication of my first novel, I can't tell you yet what it's like being a published writer. (less)
Average rating: 2.8 · 211 ratings · 82 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Backyard

2.73 avg rating — 180 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Front Yard

3.19 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Since my last, somewhat mournful blog, I'm pleased to say I've had a string of successes in my reading. Start off with Mark Helprin's "In Sunlight and In Shadow." Typical Helprin tome, coming in at 700 pages-plus. Big and heroic, a bit like something that might have been written generations ago. It's a quick read for a book so long, and lacks Helprin's usual mastery of a magical way of writing... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on November 03, 2014 09:45 • 92 views

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The Death of the ...
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Norman’s Recent Updates

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The Lost Sketchbook of Edgar Degas by Harriet Scott Chessman
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The French impressionist painter Edgar Degas returns to Harriet Scott Chessman’s fictional world as something almost evanescent. He’s an actual presence, (the painter visiting his cousin, Tell, and her family in New Orleans), but he’s there almost of ...more
Norman Draper rated a book it was amazing
The Three-Nine Line by David Freed
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The Three-Nine Line by David Freed
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Norman Draper rated a book it was amazing
Empire of the Summer Moon by S.C. Gwynne
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History at its best. Well-written, compelling and devoid of modern political sensibilities. It's hard to view the Comanches as poor victims of white encroachment since they were aggressively expansionist themselves, and perfectly willing to waste oth ...more
Norman Draper rated a book really liked it
Azincourt by Bernard Cornwell
Azincourt
by Bernard Cornwell (Goodreads Author)
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Standard fare Cornwell, which is to say excellent. I'd read just about anything this guy has written, which means I've got a long way to go. However, Cornwell tends to rely on stock characters and plots, which can sometimes make you feel you're readi ...more
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The Trumpet-Major by Thomas Hardy
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Not Hardy at his best. I suppose your would call this one of his "lighter" novels, though the tone gets confusing toward the end. Hardy is one of my favorite novelists of all time. To me, and up to this point, I felt he could do no wrong. But The Tru ...more
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Island of the Sequined Love Nun by Christopher Moore
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Christopher Moore is one of the nuttiest novelists writing today. He's like a Richard Brautigan who managed to corral his absurdist tendencies and put together something coherent. This is one of his earlier books. Lots of similarities to Carl Hiaasen ...more
Baudelaire's Revenge by Bob Van Laerhoven
"I wrote this review for the newspaper:
The Prussians are bombing Paris and people are eating rats, but Police Commissioner Lefèvre has bigger concerns.
Someone is bumping men off in grisly ways and leaving behind verses from the recently deceased p..." Read more of this review »
Virginia Woolf by Viviane Forrester
"I wrote this review for the newspaper:
At first, I thought I was reading an autobiography by Virginia Woolf, rather than a biography about her. The sentence fragments and stream-of-consciousness could be right out of “Mrs. Dalloway.”
Viviane Forre..." Read more of this review »
La Folie Baudelaire by Roberto Calasso
"This book helped me appreciate a historical novel that pays homage to Baudelaire("Baudelaire's Revenge") and went well beyond that to help me place him in the larger context of 19th Century French arts. But much of it was beyond me. The writer ass..." Read more of this review »
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message 1: by Norman (last edited Jan 06, 2014 06:17PM)

Norman Draper The other day I was thinking of books I couldn't come close to finishing. I'm afraid Faulkner's "The Sound and the Fury" was one of them. And "Finnigan's Wake," of course. But at least with those books I was able to knock off a few pages, or maybe even a chapter. Not so with "The Egoist" by George Meredith. That was a book I stopped reading after the first sentence! Awhile back, I looked the book up to revisit that offending sentence. Here it is:

"There was an ominously anxious watch of eyes visible and invisible over the infancy of Willoughby, fifth in descent from Simon Patterne, of Patterne Hall, premier of this family, a lawyer, a man of solid acquirements and stout ambition, who well understood the foundation-work of a House, and was endowed with the power of saying No to those first agents of destruction, besieging relatives."

Now, does that suck you in or what!


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