Allan H. Ropper

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Allan H. Ropper

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Average rating: 4.04 · 1,437 ratings · 163 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
Reaching Down the Rabbit Ho...

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4.02 avg rating — 1,370 ratings — published 2014 — 11 editions
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Adams and Victor's Principl...

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4.34 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 2000 — 21 editions
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How the Brain Lost Its Mind...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Neurological and Neurosurgi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1983 — 5 editions
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Manual de Terapeutica Neuro...

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Guillain Barr ̌syndrome

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Coma and Impaired Conscious...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1997
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Samuels's Manual of Neurolo...

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Office Practice of Neurolog...

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Samuel's Manual of Neurolog...

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Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole by Allan H. Ropper
"Beautiful book, similar to the ones of Sacks, which tells of various neurological cases, prognosis and course. Very sad, but interesting and well-written.

Bel libro sulla scia di Sacks, che racconta di vari casi neurologici, prognosi e decorso. Mol..." Read more of this review »
Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole by Allan H. Ropper
"Excellent book for the medical drama nerd. Interesting and refreshing novel about the passion of practicing medicine in an era when we are battling with the computer more than caring for patients."
Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole by Allan H. Ropper
"Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole is a really fascinating book. It's a little fictionalised, so we get dialogues and little portraits of character, enough that we can care about the cases discussed. Dr Ropper is pretty much everything an ideal doctor..." Read more of this review »
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Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology by Allan H. Ropper
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Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole by Allan H. Ropper
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“To become a good clinical neurologist, you have to be intensely interested by what the brain does, how it works, how it breaks down.”
Allan Ropper, Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole: Extraordinary Journeys into the Human Brain

“What they hope, what they expect, what they deserve, is that we take the time to listen, because the act of listening is therapeutic in itself. When we do it right, we learn details that make us better doctors for the next patient. The residents may not get this yet. They are focused on diagnosis and treatment, on technology, on scales, titers, doses, ratios, elevations, and deficiencies. All well and good, I tell them, but don’t forget to listen.”
Allan H. Ropper, Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole: A Renowned Neurologist Explains the Mystery and Drama of Brain Disease

“The Brits call this sort of thing Functional Neurological Symptoms, or FNS, the psychiatrists call it conversion disorder, and almost everyone else just calls it hysteria. There are three generally acknowledged, albeit uncodified, strategies for dealing with it. The Irish strategy is the most emphatic, and is epitomized by Matt O’Keefe, with whom I rounded a few years back on a stint in Ireland. “What are you going to do?” I asked him about a young woman with pseudoseizures. “What am I going to do?” he said. “I’ll tell you what I’m goin’ to do. I’m going to get her, and her family, and her husband, and the children, and even the feckin’ dog in a room, and tell ’em that they’re wasting my feckin’ time. I want ’em all to hear it so that there is enough feckin’ shame and guilt there that it’ll keep her the feck away from me. It might not cure her, but so what? As long as I get rid of them.” This approach has its adherents even on these shores. It is an approach that Elliott aspires to, as he often tells me, but can never quite marshal the umbrage, the nerve, or a sufficiently convincing accent, to pull off. The English strategy is less caustic, and can best be summarized by a popular slogan of World War II vintage currently enjoying a revival: “Keep Calm and Carry On.” It is dry, not overly explanatory, not psychological, and does not blame the patient: “Yes, you have something,” it says. “This is what it is [insert technical term here], but we will not be expending our time or a psychiatrist’s time on it. You will have to deal with it.” Predictably, the American strategy holds no one accountable, involves a brain-centered euphemistic explanation coupled with some touchy-feely stuff, and ends with a recommendation for a therapeutic program that, very often, the patient will ignore. In its abdication of responsibility, motivated by the fear of a lawsuit, it closely mirrors the beginning of the end of a doomed relationship: “It’s not you, it’s … no wait, it’s not me, either. It just is what it is.” Not surprisingly, estimates of recurrence of symptoms range from a half to two-thirds of all cases, making this one of the most common conditions that a neurologist will face, again and again. *   *   *”
Allan H. Ropper, Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole: A Renowned Neurologist Explains the Mystery and Drama of Brain Disease

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