Christopher Collier



Average rating: 3.46 · 19,963 ratings · 2,276 reviews · 53 distinct worksSimilar authors
Decision in Philadelphia: T...

3.81 avg rating — 455 ratings — published 1986 — 7 editions
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Reconstruction and the Rise...

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3.92 avg rating — 142 ratings — published 1997 — 4 editions
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The American Revolution, 17...

3.73 avg rating — 93 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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Pilgrims and Puritans: 1620...

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3.75 avg rating — 77 ratings — published 1998 — 5 editions
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The Paradox of Jamestown: 1...

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3.81 avg rating — 74 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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Slavery And The Coming Of T...

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3.92 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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The French and Indian War: ...

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3.68 avg rating — 76 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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Creating the Constitution: ...

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3.75 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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Clash of Cultures: Prehisto...

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3.85 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1997 — 4 editions
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A Century of Immigration: 1...

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3.81 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 1997 — 3 editions
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More books by Christopher Collier…
“Understanding the Constitution is of critical importance for all Americans, for it is this brief document that protects our liberties and, by keeping our nation from falling into chaos, allows us to get on with our lives. Nothing matters so much as this.”
Christopher Collier, Creating the Constitution: 1787

“For example, under the Articles of Confederation, the national government could not tax people directly, as we do today, but must ask for money from the states, which could raise it however they wanted.”
Christopher Collier, Creating the Constitution: 1787

“The principle of nationalism was not merely implied in the Constitution; it was set forth explicitly in what is known as the Supremacy clause, Article VI of the Constitution, which says:

This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution and Laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

The supremacy Clause is quite clear: States cannot pass laws against the laws of the national government. Even state constitutions are limited not just by the U.S. Constitution, but also by laws passed by congress. The delegates saw that it had to be this way, for the national government would be of no use at all if the states could pass laws contrary to national ones.”
Christopher Collier, Creating the Constitution: 1787

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