Rennay Craats



Average rating: 3.92 · 77 ratings · 7 reviews · 122 distinct works
Roald Dahl

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4.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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E B White

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3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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History of the 1920s

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2001
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My Pet Gecko

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2000 — 2 editions
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Maasai, with Code

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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Illinois: The Prairie State

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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New Mexico: The Land of Enc...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Michigan: The Wolverine State

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Snowboarding

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Fashion

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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More books by Rennay Craats…
Baseball Basketball
(4 books)
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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings

“According to Cherokee religion, beings from an upper world created Earth. The Cherokee religion included many spiritual figures. These figures were an important part of Cherokee life, but they were different from animals and people. Most Cherokee believed they had seen spiritual beings. The Little People were one type of spirit. They were very small people who were invisible unless they wanted to be seen. The Cherokee believed that it was safest to leave Little People alone. If someone saw a Little Person, he or she did not speak of it for 7 years.”
Rennay Craats, The Cherokee

“Cherokee stories have been passed down through many generations. Storytelling is an art form. Storytellers are actors, singers, dancers, and mimes who tell stories about the Cherokee people and animals. Animals are important in Cherokee stories. Many stories tell of people who could speak with the animals. Some stories tell how the Cherokee could once communicate with animals. According to this belief, the Cherokee lost this ability because their ancestors were greedy and talked too much.”
Rennay Craats, The Cherokee

“The cornbread necklace is a traditional piece of Cherokee jewelry. It is made of teardrop-shaped beads that are believed to be a gift from the Great Spirit. The Cherokee believe the corn crops watched the Cherokee as they walked along the Trail of Tears. The corn cried and drooped as it watched the Cherokee leave their land. Cherokee women strung the corn’s teardrops to create cornbeads, which were worn around the neck. This jewelry is worn as a reminder of this sad time in Cherokee history.”
Rennay Craats, The Cherokee



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