Tim Parise

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Tim Parise

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Influences

Member Since
June 2013


I was born on the island of Maui, but grew up mostly in Colorado and Montana, though I've also spent time in North Dakota, California and Washington. My first published poem came out when I was six and I've been writing away steadily ever since. I like to dabble in alternate futures as well as alternate histories, exploring man's potential to better the world instead of merely coping with it. Occasionally I also write historical nonfiction dealing with odd subjects that have taken too great a hold on my imagination.

My hobbies include anything involving ink on a page, singing Gilbert and Sullivan, yoga, photography, and trying to figure out how I’m ever going to trek the Silk Road with Asia divided up into so many separate countries nowadays
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Average rating: 3.69 · 54 ratings · 14 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Principles of Anarchism

3.69 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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In the Name of God, the Mer...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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Hyperdrive

2.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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A Case of Impiety

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings2 editions
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Totum Hominem

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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The Bettor

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2014
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Ships of the Desert

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Senator Dies at Dawn

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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L'Affaire Famille

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013
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Arms and the American: A Sy...

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Basilica by R.A. Scotti
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The Dark Side of the Sun by Terry Pratchett
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The Cheese and the Worms by Carlo Ginzburg
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Hadrian the Seventh by Frederick Rolfe
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The Prize by Daniel Yergin
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Black Robes in Paraguay by William F. Jaenike
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1491 by Charles C. Mann
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Rome's Last Citizen by Rob Goodman
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The Birth Of Tragedy by Friedrich Nietzsche
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Empire of the Clouds by James Hamilton-Paterson
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More of Tim's books…
“No form of government is valid, or has a logical claim to authority over human beings.                 Government, considered as an entity separate from an individual ruler, is a concept administered by a group.  As it is an idea and not a human being, it does not possess its own freedom of action inherently.  Nor can it acquire freedom of action, since it is the intellectual and conceptual creation of individuals.”
Tim Parise, Principles of Anarchism

“Freedom of action cannot be transferred between or among individuals or groups.                 If every man possesses the capacity to act as he chooses, without limitation, then the absence of limitation necessarily means that his capacity for freedom of action cannot be added to in any way.  He cannot acquire additional freedom of action from another.  And since that freedom is inherent in him as a human being, he cannot transfer, delegate, or surrender it even if he wishes to do so.  It remains with him permanently, undiminished, as a result of his humanity.”
Tim Parise, Principles of Anarchism

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Around the World ...: Central African Republic 12 358 Jun 25, 2017 11:04AM  
Around the World ...: calzean - Frequent Flyer 2018 177 147 Oct 26, 2018 11:52PM  
Around the World ...: Calzean - Circumnavigator 113 239 Sep 20, 2020 11:54PM  
“If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

“But you know as well as I, patriotism is a word; and one that generally comes to mean either my country, right or wrong, which is infamous, or my country is always right, which is imbecile.”
Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander

“The weather had freshened almost to coldness, for the wind was coming more easterly, from the chilly currents between Tristan and the Cape; the sloth was amazed by the change; it shunned the deck and spent its time below. Jack was in his cabin, pricking the chart with less satisfaction than he could have wished: progress, slow, serious trouble with the mainmast-- unaccountable headwinds by night-- and sipping a glass of grog; Stephen was in the mizentop, teaching Bonden to write and scanning the sea for his first albatross. The sloth sneezed, and looking up, Jack caught its gaze fixed upon him; its inverted face had an expression of anxiety and concern. 'Try a piece of this, old cock,' he said, dipping his cake in the grog and proffering the sop. 'It might put a little heart into you.' The sloth sighed, closed its eyes, but gently absorbed the piece, and sighed again.

Some minutes later he felt a touch upon his knee: the sloth had silently climbed down and it was standing there, its beady eyes looking up into his face, bright with expectation. More cake, more grog: growing confidence and esteem. After this, as soon as the drum had beat the retreat, the sloth would meet him, hurrying toward the door on its uneven legs: it was given its own bowl, and it would grip it with its claws, lowering its round face into it and pursing its lips to drink (its tongue was too short to lap). Sometimes it went to sleep in this position, bowed over the emptiness.

'In this bucket,' said Stephen, walking into the cabin, 'in this small half-bucket, now, I have the population of Dublin, London, and Paris combined: these animalculae-- what is the matter with the sloth?' It was curled on Jack's knee, breathing heavily: its bowl and Jack's glass stood empty on the table. Stephen picked it up, peered into its affable bleary face, shook it, and hung it upon its rope. It seized hold with one fore and one hind foot, letting the others dangle limp, and went to sleep.

Stephen looked sharply round, saw the decanter, smelt to the sloth, and cried, 'Jack, you have debauched my sloth.”
Patrick O'Brian, H.M.S. Surprise

“...I have had such a sickening of men in masses, and of causes, that I would not cross this room to reform parliament or prevent the union or to bring about the millennium. I speak only for myself, mind - it is my own truth alone - but man as part of a movement or a crowd is indifferent to me. He is inhuman. And I have nothing to do with nations, or nationalism. The only feelings I have - for what they are - are for men as individuals; my loyalties, such as they may be, are to private persons alone.”
Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander

“As for will, woman should be considered superior to man for Eve ate of the apple for love of knowledge and learning, but Adam ate of it merely because she asked him.”
Donna Woolfolk Cross, Pope Joan




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