David Seed

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David Seed


Born
in Nelson, The United Kingdom
November 26, 1946

Website


David Seed is a professor of English at the University of Liverpool.

Average rating: 3.79 · 2,117 ratings · 206 reviews · 34 distinct worksSimilar authors
Science Fiction: A Very Sho...

3.30 avg rating — 423 ratings — published 2011 — 13 editions
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A Companion to Science Fiction

3.93 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2005 — 6 editions
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The Fictional Labyrinths of...

3.64 avg rating — 14 ratings4 editions
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American Science Fiction an...

4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1999 — 8 editions
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Ray Bradbury

3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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قرائتی نقادانه از رمان چهره...

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3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1992 — 5 editions
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Brainwashing: The Fictions ...

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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Cinematic Fictions: The Imp...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Under the Shadow: The Atomi...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Anticipations: Essays on Ea...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1995 — 4 editions
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Quotes by David Seed  (?)
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“During the period between the wars, the term ‘alien’ became attached more and more to extraterrestrial beings, but we should remember that it had earlier roots in 19th-century race theory and politics. Hostility to aliens was institutionalized in the USA by the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) and Anarchist Exclusion Act (1901). In this same period, quasi-humans on Mars – the favourite possibility at the turn of the 19th century – tended to be described in terms consistent with the racial hierarchy of the period. In Percy Greg’s Across the Zodiac (1880), short humans are discovered on Mars who have an Aryan appearance like Swedes or Germans. And Gustavus W. Pope, in his Journey to Mars (1894), conveniently colour-codes his own Martians into red, yellow, and blue races.”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

“The first was a pair of linked stories by Philip Francis Nowlan from 1928–9 in which he introduced the character of Anthony Rogers, soon renamed Buck for the comic strip which followed. The composite volume Armageddon 2419 AD describes how our hero falls asleep at a point when the USA is the most powerful nation in the world and wakes in the 25th century to find his country in ruins, ruled by the ruthless Han. Nowlan’s tale is essentially a Yellow Peril story with futuristic weapons added. What follows is a struggle to restore freedom to the USA and the rest of the world, and to defeat once and for all ‘that monstrosity among the races of men’, the Chinese.”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

“The urge to impose a single classification on SF ignores the generic hybridity of many novels: incorporation of the Gothic in The Island of Dr Moreau, of Shakespeare’s The Tempest in Forbidden Planet, and so on. The rise of film coincides with the emergence of science fiction. The relation between SF fiction and film has included an ongoing fascination with spectacle and extraordinary special effects like those pioneered in Georges Melies’s A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Impossible Voyage (1904).”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

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