David Seed


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After completing degrees at Cambridge, Leiscester, and Hull universities, David Seed joined the English Department at Liverpool in 1977 and has been teaching there ever since.

His main areas of research are science fiction, cold war culture and spy fiction, and the interface between fiction and film.

Average rating: 3.79 · 1,806 ratings · 170 reviews · 50 distinct worksSimilar authors
Science Fiction: A Very Sho...

3.22 avg rating — 286 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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A Companion to Science Fiction

3.93 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2005 — 7 editions
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The Fictional Labyrinths of...

3.64 avg rating — 14 ratings2 editions
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American Science Fiction an...

4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1999 — 7 editions
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Ray Bradbury

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Brainwashing: The Fictions ...

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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James Joyce's "Portrait of ...

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1992 — 5 editions
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Cinematic Fictions: The Imp...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Under the Shadow: The Atomi...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Anticipations: Essays on Ea...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
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“The urge to impose a single classification on SF ignores the generic hybridity of many novels: incorporation of the Gothic in The Island of Dr Moreau, of Shakespeare’s The Tempest in Forbidden Planet, and so on. The rise of film coincides with the emergence of science fiction. The relation between SF fiction and film has included an ongoing fascination with spectacle and extraordinary special effects like those pioneered in Georges Melies’s A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Impossible Voyage (1904).”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

“The science fiction magazine has played a unique role in the development of this fiction, functioning partly as a medium for publication and partly as a forum for ongoing debate about the nature of this fiction. SF pieces were being published in a range of popular magazines by the 1890s, but the first SF-dedicated periodical was Amazing Stories, founded in 1926 by Hugo Gernsback. The opening issue identified a tradition by publishing tales by Poe, Verne, and Wells, who Gernsback situated within what he was now calling ‘scientifiction’, tales in which ‘a charming romance intermingled with scientific fact and prophetic vision’.”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

“During the period between the wars, the term ‘alien’ became attached more and more to extraterrestrial beings, but we should remember that it had earlier roots in 19th-century race theory and politics. Hostility to aliens was institutionalized in the USA by the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) and Anarchist Exclusion Act (1901). In this same period, quasi-humans on Mars – the favourite possibility at the turn of the 19th century – tended to be described in terms consistent with the racial hierarchy of the period. In Percy Greg’s Across the Zodiac (1880), short humans are discovered on Mars who have an Aryan appearance like Swedes or Germans. And Gustavus W. Pope, in his Journey to Mars (1894), conveniently colour-codes his own Martians into red, yellow, and blue races.”
David Seed, Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction

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