Stuart Jeffries

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Stuart Jeffries


Born
in Wolverhampton, The United Kingdom
January 01, 1962


Stuart Jeffries worked for the Guardian for twenty years and has written for many media outlets including the Financial Times and Psychologies. He is based in London.

Average rating: 4.0 · 1,545 ratings · 205 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
Grand Hotel Abyss: The Live...

4.08 avg rating — 1,256 ratings — published 2016 — 4 editions
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Everything, All the Time, E...

3.74 avg rating — 251 ratings7 editions
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Mrs Slocombe's Pussy: Growi...

3.21 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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Quotes by Stuart Jeffries  (?)
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“We no longer live in a world where nations and nationalism are of key significance, but in a globalised market where we are, ostensibly, free to choose – but, if the Frankfurt School’s diagnosis is right, free only to choose what is always the same, free only to choose what spiritually diminishes us, keeps us obligingly submissive to an oppressive system.”
Stuart Jeffries, Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School

“John Dewey. ‘The serious threat to our democracy is not the existence of foreign totalitarian states. It is the existence within our own personal attitudes and within our own institutions of conditions which have given a victory to external authority, discipline, uniformity and dependence upon The Leader in foreign countries. The battlefield is also”
Stuart Jeffries, Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School

“TV irony changed in post-modern times. Irony, which exploits the difference between what is said and what is meant, and between how things appear and how they really are, used to be a reliable trope for exposing hypocrisy. Post-modern irony is not liberating, but rather imprisoning. Wallace quoted the poet and philosopher Lewis Hyde: ‘Irony has only emergency use. Carried over time, it is the voice of the trapped who have come to enjoy their cage.”
Stuart Jeffries, Everything, All the Time, Everywhere Lib/E: How We Became Postmodern



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