David Galula


Born
in Sfax, Tunisia
January 10, 1919

Died
May 11, 1967

Genre


David Galula was a French military officer and scholar who was influential in developing the theory and practice of counterinsurgency warfare.

Average rating: 4.0 · 1,014 ratings · 53 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
Counterinsurgency Warfare: ...

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4.02 avg rating — 933 ratings — published 1964 — 15 editions
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Pacification in Algeria, 19...

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3.78 avg rating — 80 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
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The Tiger's Whiskers

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1965 — 4 editions
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“To confine soldiers to purely military functions while urgent and vital tasks have to be done, and nobody else is available to undertake them, would be senseless. The soldier must then be prepared to become a propagandist, a social worker, a civil engineer, a schoolteacher, a nurse, a boy scout. But only for as long as he cannot be replaced, for it is better to entrust civilian tasks to civilians.”
David Galula, Counterinsurgency Warfare: Theory and Practice

“PROPAGANDA-A ONE-SIDED WEAPON
The asymmetrical situation has important effects on propaganda. The insurgent, having no responsibility, is free to use every trick; if necessary, he can lie, cheat, exaggerate. He is not obliged to prove; he is judged by what he promises, not by what he does. Consequently, propaganda is a powerful weapon for him. With no positive policy but with good propaganda, the insurgent may still win.
The counterinsurgent is tied to his responsibilities and to his past, and for him, facts speak louder than words. He is judged on what he does, not on what he says. If he lies, cheats, exaggerates, and does not prove, he may achieve some temporary successes, but at the price of being discredited for good. And he cannot cheat much unless his political structures are monolithic, for the legitimate opposition in his own camp would soon disclose his every psychological maneuver. For him, propaganda can be no more than a secondary weapon, valuable only if intended to inform and not to fool. A counterinsurgent can seldom cover bad or nonexistent policy with propaganda.”
David Galula, Counterinsurgency Warfare: Theory and Practice

“...to let the military direct the entire process...is so dangerous that it must be resisted at all costs.”
David Galula, Counterinsurgency Warfare: Theory and Practice

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