Jacob S. Hacker



Average rating: 4.01 · 2,570 ratings · 313 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
Winner-Take-All Politics: H...

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4.02 avg rating — 1,745 ratings — published 2010 — 11 editions
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American Amnesia: Business,...

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4.20 avg rating — 472 ratings — published 2016 — 6 editions
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The Great Risk Shift: The A...

3.78 avg rating — 165 ratings — published 2006 — 8 editions
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Off Center: The Republican ...

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3.59 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
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The Divided Welfare State

3.69 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2002 — 5 editions
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The Road to Nowhere: The Ge...

3.92 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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Health at Risk: America's A...

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Shared Responsibility, Shar...

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4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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Let them Eat Tweets: How th...

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Ending Poverty in America: ...

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3.32 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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“Today the message most commentators take from Adam Smith is that government should get out of the way. But that was not Smith’s message. He was enthusiastic about government regulation so long as it wasn’t simply a ruse to advantage one set of commercial interests over another. When “regulation . . . is in favor of the workmen,” he wrote in The Wealth of Nations, “it is always just and equitable.” He was equally enthusiastic about the taxes needed to fund effective governance. “Every tax,” he wrote, “is to the person who pays it a badge, not of slavery but of liberty.”9 Contemporary libertarians who invoke Smith before decrying labor laws or comparing taxation to theft seem to have skipped these passages. Far from a tribune of unregulated markets, Smith was a celebrant of effective governance. His biggest concern about the state wasn’t that it would be overbearing but that it would be overly beholden to narrow private interests. His greatest ire was reserved not for public officials but for powerful merchants who combined to rig public policies and repress private wages. These “tribes of monopoly” he compared with an “overgrown standing army” that had “become formidable to the government, and upon many occasions intimidate the legislature.” Too often, Smith maintained, concentrated economic power skewed the crafting of government policy. “Whenever the legislature attempts to regulate the differences between masters and their workmen,” he complained, “its counsellors are always the masters. . . . They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.”10”
Jacob S. Hacker, American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper

“The United States now ranks twentieth out of twenty-seven OECD nations in the share of young people expected to finish high school.50”
Jacob S. Hacker, American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper

“The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates that the United States would have to spend $3.6 trillion more than currently budgeted just to bring our infrastructure up to acceptable levels by 2020.95 China and India are spending almost 10 percent of GDP on infrastructure; Europe, around 5 percent.96 Even Mexico spends just over 3 percent.97 The United States has not broken 3 percent once since the mid-1970s.98”
Jacob S. Hacker, American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper



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