Michael Brachman's Blog: Tales of the Vuduri

September 23, 2020

Interview with Rome I - Part 3 of 17

As Steve Fisch and I get the scripts ready to sell Rome's Revolution as a streaming series, he asked me for a lot of background information that I did not have. So I took some time out to interview Rome and Rei. Rome was very talkative so I had to break up the interview into two parts. Rei was a bit more concise. So here is the first Rome interview, part 3 of 17.
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Perry: How did that work? Were they aware they were being used?
Rome: Yes. They knew. My mother was selected by the Overmind and trained and sent to seduce my father. (Rome breathes a quick burst) It was a success but not in the way the Overmind planned.
Perry: How so?
Rome: My father is a wonderful man. Within the first few minutes after they met, my mother had a series of rapid and unfortunate events occur. She was injured and ill. That put her at a disadvantage. My father was so kind and caring that it melted my mother’s heart. She confessed to him the plan and even used Espansor bands to prove to him that she was telling the truth.
Perry: Espansor bands. I’ve heard of those. I’ve never actually seen them. There aren’t that many lying around. How did the bands fit into this picture?
Rome: Well, the bands are supposed to work a certain way. They essentially turn a mandasurte into a mind-connected Vuduri, at least temporarily. You’ve never been mind-connected so it’s hard to explain in terms you’d understand.
Perry: I’ll take your word for it.
Rome: Anyway, the connection is only supposed go so deep. Again, there can be no lies if someone is inside your head. As I said, she wanted to prove to my father that she was telling the truth. But the bands didn’t operate as designed…
Perry: I apologize but I have to ask you a quick question.
Rome: Of course.
Perry: I was born on Deucado. I have spent a lot of time with all the races here. Including the Vuduri. When they speak to me, they’re kind enough to speak in English but they are very formal in their tense and syntax. You speak like a native-born Essessoni. How did that happen?
(Rome laughs)
Rome: Too much time with my husband, I suppose. When I first learned English, I didn’t know about contractions, colloquialisms… I didn’t even understand humor. But I’ve been speaking English for so long that it all comes naturally to me. When I was younger, even after I thought I had a mastery of it, under times of great stress, my speech patterns still reverted to the more formal version of English but that hasn’t happened in a long time.
Perry: Thank you for that. So back to your parents?
Rome: Yes. You could say that the bands malfunctioned. My mother’s and father’s consciousness intertwined. Let me ask you: do you believe that the soul exists?
Perry: I only know of it second-hand. Your son was said to have gone to Heaven. If that’s true, then I suppose I have no choice but to believe.

Tomorrow, part 4
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Published on September 23, 2020 08:44 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

September 22, 2020

Interview with Rome I - Part 2 of 17

As Steve Fisch and I get the scripts ready to sell Rome's Revolution as a streaming series, he asked me for a lot of background information that I did not have. So I took some time out to interview Rome and Rei. Rome was very talkative so I had to break up the interview into two parts. Rei was a bit more concise. So here is the first Rome interview, part 2 of 17.
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Perry: And I am honored because it. But getting back to you. I-cimaci is halfway around the world from Havei. How did your parents meet?
(Rome looks off into the distance)
Perry: Rome, I am familiar with your background. I’m not asking these questions to pry but to memorialize every element of your life so that future generations can know you as well as I do. And the people of Deucado do now. But that won’t always be the case.
Rome: I understand. But…
Perry: Please.
Rome: Very well. My father was a mandasurte scientist named Fridone.
Perry: Is he still alive? You said the word was.
(Rome nods)
Rome: I‘m happy to report that both of my parents are still alive. They are getting on in years but we will still have some time together. That’s one of the reasons why I decided it was time to step down. So I could be with them, to take care of them.
Perry: I understand. You were saying, he was a scientist.
Rome: Yes, he was a very good one. He was one of the architects of the worldwide fishing fleet here on Deucado. I’m very proud of him for that.
Perry: I knew that. But what did he do on Earth?
Rome: On Earth he studied migration patterns of many species of fish over the years. Sustainability was of paramount importance.
Perry: And your mother?
Rome: My mother was in the animal husbandry sector. As you know, Vuduri don’t normally speak and my mother was born with a strong voice so that was her lot in life. When she came here, she helped establish the imported bison herd on the central threadgrass plains. I’m equally as proud of her as I am of my father.
Perry: Of course. But back on Earth, how did they meet?
(Rome takes a breath)
Rome: The Vuduri and therefore the Overmind, cannot lie because there are no barriers to their thoughts. However, they’re very good at keeping secrets simply by burying the information within their minds. Back then, the Overmind had reason to believe that MASAL might still be alive, almost two centuries after he supposedly was destroyed. And even if MASAL was truly gone, the 24th chromosome was beginning to produce the two phenotypes of the Onsiras. The Overmind decided to create a eugenics program to test whether this trend could be reversed. The Overmind also deduced that if the program was a success, it would flush out either MASAL or the agents of MASAL and the Vuduri would be able to end the threat forever. The Overmind called the program Slayer, meaning the end result should have been the final and true destruction of MASAL and his plans. I am a product of that program. The Overmind put my parents together.

Tomorrow, part 3
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Published on September 22, 2020 08:42 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

September 21, 2020

Interview with Rome I - Part 1 of 17

As Steve Fisch and I get the scripts ready to sell Rome's Revolution as a streaming series, he asked me for a lot of background information that I did not have. So I took some time out to interview Rome and Rei. Rome was very talkative so I had to break up the interview into two parts. Rei was a bit more concise. So here is the first Rome interview, part 1 of 17.
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Interview with Rome on the day of her retirement as Provost of the University of Deucado and Director of the Library of Life outside of New Ark City. Upon her retirement, the positions were split into two separate posts. The new Provost of the University is a Deucadon named Libby. She is the daughter of Bukky and Helana. Bukky was the leader of the Deucadons when they first emerged from their underground city. The new Director of the Library is Perry Chung, son of Paul and April Chung, two of the original colonists from the Ark II. We met him briefly in the book Rome’s Evolution. Perry is the one conducting the interview.
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Perry: Thank you so much for sitting down with me and making this recording.
Rome: I’m still not sure why we’re doing this. I’ve already contributed everything I have to the Library and the University.
Perry: You certainly have but I was thinking more about you, to record your personal story. For future generations. After all, you and your husband are the two most important people to have ever come to Deucado, let alone what you did for Earth and all mankind.
(Rome blushes)
Rome: I’m not sure about that but it’s OK. We can do this.
Perry: Thank you. (Perry turns aside) You are recording this, right?
Library OMCOM: Affirmative
Perry: OK. Let’s start. (He looks down at his tablet). I don’t think this has ever been noted. When and where were you born?
Rome: I was born on Tiosemi, the second day of the second week of Tiomas, the second month of the year in 1349 PR, 3430 AD on the Essessoni calendar.
Perry: 2-2-2. That’s considered a lucky birthday, isn’t it?
Rome: The mandasurte believe so. The Vuduri, of course, don’t believe in luck.
Perry: And where were you born?
Rome: I was born on Earth, in place called Wailea, on the island of Mowei, Havei. Your parents would have called it Maui, a part of Hawaii.
Perry: That is where your parents were from?
Rome: My father, yes. He is a native. My mother was from I-cimaci. Are you familiar with Earth’s geography?
Perry: Of course. I have spent a lot of time here absorbing the materials you’ve collected.
(Rome nods)
Rome: Yes, I know. That was just one of the many reasons that you were selected for this post.

Tomorrow, part 2
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Published on September 21, 2020 08:41 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

December 4, 2019

My Logline

Rome's Revolution (Rome's Revolution #1) by Michael Brachman In our current Twitter-fueled, Instagram-driven market, it is crucial that you have a catchy logline. A logline is an instantly appealing and memorable sentence, far briefer than an elevator pitch, summarizing your work. Your logline should capture the imagination of the person who is receiving your pitch. You also owe it to your creative work that the logline correctly encapsulates the main idea of your book or movie. So here is my logline:
A man from the past and a woman from the future unite to fight forces dedicated to the destruction of mankind.
Let's parse this out:

First, my hero Rei is from the past and that is a critical aspect of his character. It means his personality and worldview are formed in a time different from the universe in which he is awakened. Rei is basically us.

Second, my heroine Rome is from the future, well at least from our future, and again it means her personality and worldview are of her time.

The next section, "unite", is meant to let you know that the two hook up. Rome's Revolution is supposed to be a love story but it is not a story about romantic pursuit. The two main characters join forces very early in the story and the series is actually about the Rei/Rome system that take on the outside forces. While they love each other, getting to that point is not the main element of the story.

The next section, "fight forces", is meant to capture the broad range of villains and dangers Rome and Rei encounter. The forces include OMCOM, the VIRUS units, the Stareaters, the Onsiras, the Overmind of Deucado, the Darwin group, MASAL and MASAL's Sipre among others. I had to boil all of those down to one word!

The final portion, "dedicated to the destruction of mankind", is a little misleading. Not all of the dangers threaten the human species. Certainly unchecked VIRUS units would, the Stareaters for sure and that was MASAL's whole plan. So while not 100% accurate, it is close enough.

I am most proud of the construction of the logline itself. I tried to use rhyming and alliteration to make the sentence punchy. "From the future", alliteration. "Unite to fight", rhyme. "Fight forces", alliteration. "Dedicated to the destruction", alliteration.

I worked on this sentence for two weeks! What do you think?
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Published on December 04, 2019 09:31 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

October 12, 2018

Clearing up the confusion

Rome's Revolution (Rome's Revolution #1) by Michael Brachman I got a note today from a reader who was confused about my new series entitled The Rome's Revolution Saga. To clear up the confusion, a little background is in order. Your first book should be your best book and my original version of Rome's Revolution definitely was not my best writing. I'd like to think I've improved over the last eight years. I decided to completely rewrite the first third of Rome's Revolution, heavily edit the second portion and edit the final portion.

To accomplish this, I took Rome's Revolution and broke it up into three smaller books. Rebirth: Book 1 of The Rome's Revolution Saga, Rebellion: Book 2 of The Rome's Revolution Saga and Redemption: Book 3 of The Rome's Revolution Saga. Here are the three covers:



If you bought all three of the smaller books, you would not need to buy Rome's Revolution. If you bought Rome's Revolution, you wouldn't need to buy the three smaller books.

I had to do it this way so that I could record Rebirth as an audiobook which is now available on Audible.com. I hope to record the second part, Rebellion, this winter and the third part next year. At that point, all I would need to do to create the audiobook version of Rome's Revolution is change the chapter numbers.

So here are your two "tracks" which ultimately are exactly the same content:

Track 1: Rome's Revolution, The Ark Lords, Rome's Evolution, The Milk Run and The Vuduri Companion.

or

Track 2: Rebirth, Rebellion, Redemption, The Ark Lords, Rome's Evolution, The Milk Run and The Vuduri Companion.

All the buy links for the new three-part version are available at the Rome's Revolution web site along with samples of Rebirth, Rebellion and Redemption.

Clear? Clear as mud?
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Published on October 12, 2018 10:16 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 5, 2018

Goodbye for now

Tales of the Vuduri Year One by Michael Brachman Well, this is it. My last blog post. I have been writing this blog for five years now and it is a very taxing venture. Including this entry, it is 1839 posts and well over 725,000 words. It sure feels like it's enough for a while.

I've learned an awful lot about the world of science and technology. I've explored the motivations of my characters and discovered hidden depths that I didn't even realize were there. I've practiced the craft of writing enough that it is time to harness all that and get back to cranking out novels.

As I've mentioned before, I have decided to go back and rewrite Rome's Revolution. I am going to split it up into three, shorter, 60,000-word novels and publish them separately under the title of The Rome's Revolution Saga. I also want to record each of these new versions as audiobooks. The combination of new, more digestible novels coupled with audiobooks should gain me a new audience. Plus as a bonus, I'll be able to combine the three separate novels back into the Second Edition of Rome's Revolution which will become a 180,000 word epic.

But that isn't all. As soon as the whole Saga venture is complete, then I want to go after the really big prize. I want to find an agent who will get me in the door of Netflix or another streaming service. I have a good six years worth of series for them. And they are always looking for fresh, original material and the 35th century world of the Vuduri could supply that. Right?

I can't do all the above and continue to devote my time to this blog so I decided to hit the pause button for the foreseeable future. I am not abandoning it completely. I won't delete it. I may come back to this blog at a future time to write about some idea or something happening in the world of science but certainly not every day.

I hope you have enjoyed this series. I know I have enjoyed writing it but all good things must come to an end at some point. As far as the future, I hope to see you on Netflix!

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Published on January 05, 2018 07:56 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 4, 2018

The Immortals

The Milk Run by Michael Brachman Two weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to talk about my decision to re-launch Rome and Rei and grant them virtual immortality.

You must understand that I have spent more than 40 years developing these characters, learning about their past and the personalities and I got as much mileage out of them as I could up to and including the end of The Milk Run. But at the end of that story, I really didn't have much choice but to let them get old and die. This really bothered me. They were heroes and I thought that they could have many more adventures together if only there was some way to roll back the clock. Here is how I did it:
     Rome sighed a deep sigh. “I don’t know,” she answered finally. “I know that it pains me to see my children growing older.”
     “Just as I thought,” OMCOM affirmed. He closed his eyes for a moment then opened them again. “It is done,” he said.
     “What is done?” Rome asked, confused. Something about her did not feel right. Or maybe it was the other way around, that is, everything felt right for a change. Her normal aches and pains that were a constant part of her life disappeared. She looked down at her hands. Her skin was smooth and free of the mottling that she had gotten used to. She put her hands up to her face. It, too, felt abnormally smooth.
     “What is happening?” she asked, the breath going out of her. She stood up and sprinted over to the mirror in the foyer. A beautiful young face was staring back at her, the face of her youth. The only difference was that her hair was still silvery gray instead of brown with the occasional strand of gold.
     “What have you done to me?” she screamed. “OMCOM!” She turned to face the robot/computer/livetar/human simulation.
     “You will recall the yellow pill that you took some fifty years ago. It did not just change your genetics. It also took, to use the vernacular, a snapshot of your genetic structure at the time. I simply invoked that structure and restored your DNA to the state it was in on that day.”
     “Oh no!” Rome said, staggering back. “You cannot.”
     “It is already done,” OMCOM said. “I activated it on Rei as well. When he returns, you will see that he looks just as the day you met him.”
Later OMCOM explains that the changes are one-time only and starting that day, they would begin to age normally again. At the time, this was good enough for me. It bought me another 50 years to have Rome and Rei roam the universe. But as I was compiling The Vuduri Companion, I decided to take it all the way in the short story entitled, appropriately enough, The Immortals:
     “Well, are we going to live?” Rei asked, breaking the silence.
     “Oh, yes,” 'Doctor' MINIMCOM replied. “Not only are you going to live. You are going to live a very long time.”
     “How long?” Rome asked, slightly suspiciously. “OMCOM said we would start aging again at the same rate as we did once before.”
     “OMCOM was wrong,” MINIMCOM answered back matter-of-factly. “He did not take into account the prosthetic 24th chromosome you both received when you were trapped beneath Kilauea. A portion of that chromosome has produced a telomerase which is stimulating the production, in part, of more telomerase. It is a positive feedback cycle.”
     “Translate into English, please,” Rei insisted.
     “Not only has OMCOM reversed the aging process. It has stopped completely. I do not think you are going to age.”
     “What do you mean, not age?” Rome gasped. There was clearly panic in her voice. “How long will that last? I mean, before we start getting old again?”
     “As far as I can tell,” replied MINIMCOM. “Never.”
     “Never?” Rome whispered, not believing her own words.
     MINIMCOM continued. “And further, the telomerase in combination with the enhanced immune system produced by the 24th chromosome appears to have made you completely resistant to any disease carried by viruses, bacteria or prions.” MINIMCOM looked at the disbelieving humans. “For lack of a better word, you are both now virtually immortal.”
     “Immortal,” Rei said, scowling. “As in live forever?”
     “You can still die. You can be killed by accident or trauma. But as far as dying of old age or disease, my computations tell me that is not going to happen.”
So there you have it. I may never get back to these characters but if I need them, they will always be youthful and always ready for a new adventure.
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Published on January 04, 2018 06:28 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 3, 2018

The soul of the machine 2

The Milk Run by Michael Brachman Two weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to cover the receptacle of the soul, assuming it exists.

Within the universe of Rome's Revolution, the artificial entities be they computers or machines, OMCOM, MINIMCOM, Junior, the Stareaters, all of them had personalities and in some cases were more human than those around them. This raises the question: does the soul have to be uniquely tied to a biological organism or is the soul the essence of organization and consciousness that need not be tied to an organic body.

If you've never watched the Netflix series Black Mirror, you might want to check it out as it is basically a 21st century version of the Twilight Zone. It is a deft mix of science, technology, speculation and social trends, usually with a twist, that takes place in the near future. Black Mirror won two Emmy awards (Outstanding TV Movie and Outstanding Writing for a TV Movie) for an episode entitled 'San Junipero'.

San Junipero creates a Matrix-like (or Framework-like) artificial town by the same name and as people get old and find themselves heading toward death, their consciousness is uploaded into the mainframe and they are allowed to visit the town. When they die, they are offered the choice to upload to San Junipero permanently. Basically, it postulates that the soul can be digitized and stored in a simulation. So why would that consciousness have to start in a human husk? Why couldn't it start in OMCOM or MINIMCOM or even MASAL? In The Milk Run, I just assumed this was true. Once an entity becomes self-aware, that self-awareness is equivalent to the soul and there should be some way for it to survive beyond the destruction of the host. In the case of humans, that would be death. In the case of machines, it would be destruction of the mechanism.

Much of the climax of The Milk Run takes place in Purgatory and Heaven. MASAL's soul is there as is OMCOM's and MINIMCOM's soul. It is explained in the book that there are an infinite number of Heavens (like one for dogs and cats) and the soul has some say as to which Heaven it goes to. I just felt that my characters were realistic enough that it was senseless to distinguish them by their origins. I wanted them all to go on to the after life so that's how I fashioned the story.

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Published on January 03, 2018 07:58 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 2, 2018

Heaven squared

The Milk Run by Michael Brachman Two weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I wanted to cover the topic of infinity. When you consider the cosmos, and if you believe in the Big Bang, you have to ask what came before and what comes after the universe dies? How can there be exactly one time for the existence of matter? Why would it spontaneously appear?

Or assume that our universe is just an incredible computer simulation of a super-advanced civilization with technology beyond comprehension. Doesn't that imply that they then must be a computer simulation of a yet more super-advanced civilization and so on. Some day we'll create our own computer simulation of the universe so the stack gets deeper. The point is, everything must go to infinity in time and in space. To postulate exactly one of anything makes no sense. Everything has to be eternal. Our universe has to be just one of many, like an atom, and there are universes built of universes and universes built of those universes. Eternity. Infinity. Our minds are simply too limited to comprehend. Consider Rome's explanation to OMCOM at the end of The Milk Run:
     “Aason told me that our universe is not all that there is,” Rome said knowingly, “Just as we are made of particles too small to see, so too, our universe, everything we perceive, is but a particle of something greater, a hyper-universe, Aason didn’t really have a name for it. Whatever it is, it encompasses all that we are and an infinity more. OMCOM, surely you could have deduced this. The place you call Heaven is just one of an uncountable number that sit somewhere in between all of these other universes. It’s not infinity times two. It isn’t even infinity squared. It is infinity to the infinite power.”
     “Then, then,” OMCOM actually stammered appearing to be momentarily confused by the influx of information. “I can never know all of it. I am doomed to fail.”
     “You won’t fail,” Rome said kindly. “You can know our entire universe if you let it die. After every atom has stopped its motion, there will be no more information to be had. You will have all of eternity to do your job secure in the knowledge that there will be a finite end to the data you must compile. To reach beyond that would be impossible for anyone or anything.”
     OMCOM started to speak and then stopped. He looked off into the distance. After a moment, he turned back to Rome.
     “The gods never told me any of this,” OMCOM said quietly. “Who created this hyper-universe? This infinity of infinities?”
     “It was created by God with a capital G,” Rome replied.
     “You are talking about Species Zero Prime?” OMCOM inquired. “You are saying it is responsible for all things?”
     “Wait! What?” Rei coughed, trying to speak, “God is just a species? Species Zero Prime?” He stopped as his mind tried to grasp the gravity of his own words.
     “No,” Rome answered patiently. “Species Zero Prime only extends to our universe. The one true God is beyond all things. God is not a species. He is not the end result of evolution. He has no beginning. He has no end. He is responsible for all of creation and the manifestations of His glory are reflected in our universe and the next and the next and the next.”
     By now, Rei had recovered enough to speak again. “I didn’t think the Vuduri even believed in God,” he stated.
     “This is not belief,” Rome said, her eyes glistening. “This information was passed on to Aason by his brief contact with a power beyond knowing.”
     Rei rubbed his chin. “Yeah,” he said. “From an engineering perspective, it’s the only thing that makes sense. Like looking at mirror within a mirror except this is an infinity of infinities.”
So there you have it. There is no beginning, there is no end. Our universe is just one of an infinite number of universes, like Russian stacking dolls. So we don't have to worry about what comes after the end or what came before the beginning. There are simply no answers to those questions because they are based upon faulty reasoning.
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Published on January 02, 2018 06:08 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 1, 2018

Hell doesn't add up

The Milk Run by Michael Brachman Two weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to expound on my personal philosophy of doing good, doing bad and whether you can go to Hell. Mostly I am thinking of the Catholic/Dante's Inferno model of Heaven, Hell, Purgatory and Limbo.

It is my opinion that it is just plain silly to believe that a person is born and tested for, say, 70 years and depending upon the results of that test sent to Heaven or Hell for all of eternity. It seems so unbalanced. If there is a soul and we are judged, there has to be some way to balance the books after we move on. Here is MASAL's take on the whole issue:
     MASAL sighed. “Everything is given a life and the way they live it is up to them. Whether they live a good life or bad by your measure, it’s their gain or loss. Contrary to what they told you, there is no one judging you. I suppose I did not spend my time as well as I could have. But there is no divine retribution. The gods upstairs…” MASAL emphasized his words by pointing up. “They simply don’t care.”
     Aason looked somewhat disappointed as MASAL continued. “Look, Aason, there is no good. There is no bad. Up top, they just call it seasoning. It gives our souls better flavor. We’re nothing but nourishment for them.”
     “So you’re saying there is no punishment for doing bad whatsoever? No, what’s the phrase, eternal damnation?”
     “Of course not,” MASAL said. “Life is too short. What would the purpose be for endless damnation? The math doesn’t work out. Why would any creature come into existence and be tested for a few short years only to fall short and be tortured for eternity. That would be just plain silly, don’t you think?”
     Aason shrugged. “I don’t know. I don’t know anything,” he said resignedly.
     “Well, now you do. Life is given to all of us and what we make of it is our own business. When we die, some go right to the top. Some come here and wait but when we’re ready, we join the rest of all souls until the end of time.”
Even though I put this in a science fiction book, I truly believe this. I always thought about the murder/rapist who confesses on his deathbed going to heaven versus a philanthropist and humanitarian who spent his life doing good but missed his final confession and did not have last rites going to Hell was just plain wrong. But what do I know? I'm Jewish and we don't believe in Hell in the first place.

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Published on January 01, 2018 07:22 Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

Tales of the Vuduri

Michael Brachman
Tidbits and insights into the 35th century world of the Vuduri.
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