Michael Brachman's Blog: Tales of the Vuduri

October 12, 2018

Rome's Revolution (Rome's Revolution #1) by Michael BrachmanI got a note today from a reader who was confused about my new series entitled The Rome's Revolution Saga. To clear up the confusion, a little background is in order. Your first book should be your best book and my original version of Rome's Revolution definitely was not my best writing. I'd like to think I've improved over the last eight years. I decided to completely rewrite the first third of Rome's Revolution, heavily edit the second portion and edit the final portion.

To accomplish this, I took Rome's Revolution and broke it up into three smaller books. Rebirth: Book 1 of The Rome's Revolution Saga, Rebellion: Book 2 of The Rome's Revolution Saga and Redemption: Book 3 of The Rome's Revolution Saga. Here are the three covers:



If you bought all three of the smaller books, you would not need to buy Rome's Revolution. If you bought Rome's Revolution, you wouldn't need to buy the three smaller books.

I had to do it this way so that I could record Rebirth as an audiobook which is now available on Audible.com. I hope to record the second part, Rebellion, this winter and the third part next year. At that point, all I would need to do to create the audiobook version of Rome's Revolution is change the chapter numbers.

So here are your two "tracks" which ultimately are exactly the same content:

Track 1: Rome's Revolution, The Ark Lords, Rome's Evolution, The Milk Run and The Vuduri Companion.

or

Track 2: Rebirth, Rebellion, Redemption, The Ark Lords, Rome's Evolution, The Milk Run and The Vuduri Companion.

All the buy links for the new three-part version are available at the Rome's Revolution web site along with samples of Rebirth, Rebellion and Redemption.

Clear? Clear as mud?
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Published on October 12, 2018 10:16 • 41 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 5, 2018

Tales of the Vuduri Year One by Michael BrachmanWell, this is it. My last blog post. I have been writing this blog for five years now and it is a very taxing venture. Including this entry, it is 1839 posts and well over 725,000 words. It sure feels like it's enough for a while.

I've learned an awful lot about the world of science and technology. I've explored the motivations of my characters and discovered hidden depths that I didn't even realize were there. I've practiced the craft of writing enough that it is time to harness all that and get back to cranking out novels.

As I've mentioned before, I have decided to go back and rewrite Rome's Revolution. I am going to split it up into three, shorter, 60,000-word novels and publish them separately under the title of The Rome's Revolution Saga. I also want to record each of these new versions as audiobooks. The combination of new, more digestible novels coupled with audiobooks should gain me a new audience. Plus as a bonus, I'll be able to combine the three separate novels back into the Second Edition of Rome's Revolution which will become a 180,000 word epic.

But that isn't all. As soon as the whole Saga venture is complete, then I want to go after the really big prize. I want to find an agent who will get me in the door of Netflix or another streaming service. I have a good six years worth of series for them. And they are always looking for fresh, original material and the 35th century world of the Vuduri could supply that. Right?

I can't do all the above and continue to devote my time to this blog so I decided to hit the pause button for the foreseeable future. I am not abandoning it completely. I won't delete it. I may come back to this blog at a future time to write about some idea or something happening in the world of science but certainly not every day.

I hope you have enjoyed this series. I know I have enjoyed writing it but all good things must come to an end at some point. As far as the future, I hope to see you on Netflix!

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Published on January 05, 2018 07:56 • 231 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 4, 2018

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanTwo weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to talk about my decision to re-launch Rome and Rei and grant them virtual immortality.

You must understand that I have spent more than 40 years developing these characters, learning about their past and the personalities and I got as much mileage out of them as I could up to and including the end of The Milk Run. But at the end of that story, I really didn't have much choice but to let them get old and die. This really bothered me. They were heroes and I thought that they could have many more adventures together if only there was some way to roll back the clock. Here is how I did it:
     Rome sighed a deep sigh. “I don’t know,” she answered finally. “I know that it pains me to see my children growing older.”
     “Just as I thought,” OMCOM affirmed. He closed his eyes for a moment then opened them again. “It is done,” he said.
     “What is done?” Rome asked, confused. Something about her did not feel right. Or maybe it was the other way around, that is, everything felt right for a change. Her normal aches and pains that were a constant part of her life disappeared. She looked down at her hands. Her skin was smooth and free of the mottling that she had gotten used to. She put her hands up to her face. It, too, felt abnormally smooth.
     “What is happening?” she asked, the breath going out of her. She stood up and sprinted over to the mirror in the foyer. A beautiful young face was staring back at her, the face of her youth. The only difference was that her hair was still silvery gray instead of brown with the occasional strand of gold.
     “What have you done to me?” she screamed. “OMCOM!” She turned to face the robot/computer/livetar/human simulation.
     “You will recall the yellow pill that you took some fifty years ago. It did not just change your genetics. It also took, to use the vernacular, a snapshot of your genetic structure at the time. I simply invoked that structure and restored your DNA to the state it was in on that day.”
     “Oh no!” Rome said, staggering back. “You cannot.”
     “It is already done,” OMCOM said. “I activated it on Rei as well. When he returns, you will see that he looks just as the day you met him.”
Later OMCOM explains that the changes are one-time only and starting that day, they would begin to age normally again. At the time, this was good enough for me. It bought me another 50 years to have Rome and Rei roam the universe. But as I was compiling The Vuduri Companion, I decided to take it all the way in the short story entitled, appropriately enough, The Immortals:
     “Well, are we going to live?” Rei asked, breaking the silence.
     “Oh, yes,” 'Doctor' MINIMCOM replied. “Not only are you going to live. You are going to live a very long time.”
     “How long?” Rome asked, slightly suspiciously. “OMCOM said we would start aging again at the same rate as we did once before.”
     “OMCOM was wrong,” MINIMCOM answered back matter-of-factly. “He did not take into account the prosthetic 24th chromosome you both received when you were trapped beneath Kilauea. A portion of that chromosome has produced a telomerase which is stimulating the production, in part, of more telomerase. It is a positive feedback cycle.”
     “Translate into English, please,” Rei insisted.
     “Not only has OMCOM reversed the aging process. It has stopped completely. I do not think you are going to age.”
     “What do you mean, not age?” Rome gasped. There was clearly panic in her voice. “How long will that last? I mean, before we start getting old again?”
     “As far as I can tell,” replied MINIMCOM. “Never.”
     “Never?” Rome whispered, not believing her own words.
     MINIMCOM continued. “And further, the telomerase in combination with the enhanced immune system produced by the 24th chromosome appears to have made you completely resistant to any disease carried by viruses, bacteria or prions.” MINIMCOM looked at the disbelieving humans. “For lack of a better word, you are both now virtually immortal.”
     “Immortal,” Rei said, scowling. “As in live forever?”
     “You can still die. You can be killed by accident or trauma. But as far as dying of old age or disease, my computations tell me that is not going to happen.”
So there you have it. I may never get back to these characters but if I need them, they will always be youthful and always ready for a new adventure.
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Published on January 04, 2018 06:28 • 144 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 3, 2018

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanTwo weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to cover the receptacle of the soul, assuming it exists.

Within the universe of Rome's Revolution, the artificial entities be they computers or machines, OMCOM, MINIMCOM, Junior, the Stareaters, all of them had personalities and in some cases were more human than those around them. This raises the question: does the soul have to be uniquely tied to a biological organism or is the soul the essence of organization and consciousness that need not be tied to an organic body.

If you've never watched the Netflix series Black Mirror, you might want to check it out as it is basically a 21st century version of the Twilight Zone. It is a deft mix of science, technology, speculation and social trends, usually with a twist, that takes place in the near future. Black Mirror won two Emmy awards (Outstanding TV Movie and Outstanding Writing for a TV Movie) for an episode entitled 'San Junipero'.

San Junipero creates a Matrix-like (or Framework-like) artificial town by the same name and as people get old and find themselves heading toward death, their consciousness is uploaded into the mainframe and they are allowed to visit the town. When they die, they are offered the choice to upload to San Junipero permanently. Basically, it postulates that the soul can be digitized and stored in a simulation. So why would that consciousness have to started in a human husk? Why couldn't it start in OMCOM or MINIMCOM or even MASAL? In The Milk Run, I just assumed this was true. Once an entity becomes self-aware, that self-awareness is equivalent to the soul and there should be some way for it to survive beyond the destruction of the host. In the case of humans, that would be death. In the case of machines, it would be destruction of the mechanism.

Much of the climax of The Milk Run takes place in Purgatory and Heaven. MASAL's soul is there as is OMCOM's and MINIMCOM's soul. It is explained in the book that there are an infinite number of Heavens (like one for dogs and cats) and the soul has some say as to which Heaven it goes to. I just felt that my characters were realistic enough that it was senseless to distinguish them by their origins. I wanted them all to go on to the after life so that's how I fashioned the story.

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Published on January 03, 2018 07:58 • 139 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 2, 2018

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanTwo weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I wanted to cover the topic of infinity. When you consider the cosmos, and if you believe in the Big Bang, you have to ask what came before and what comes after the universe dies? How can there be exactly one time for the existence of matter? Why would it spontaneously appear?

Or assume that our universe is just an incredible computer simulation of a super-advanced civilization with technology beyond comprehension. Doesn't that imply that they then must be a computer simulation of a yet more super-advanced civilization and so on. Some day we'll create our own computer simulation of the universe so the stack gets deeper. The point is, everything must go to infinity in time and in space. To postulate exactly one of anything makes no sense. Everything has to be eternal. Our universe has to be just one of many, like an atom, and there are universes built of universes and universes built of those universes. Eternity. Infinity. Our minds are simply too limited to comprehend. Consider Rome's explanation to OMCOM at the end of The Milk Run:
     “Aason told me that our universe is not all that there is,” Rome said knowingly, “Just as we are made of particles too small to see, so too, our universe, everything we perceive, is but a particle of something greater, a hyper-universe, Aason didn’t really have a name for it. Whatever it is, it encompasses all that we are and an infinity more. OMCOM, surely you could have deduced this. The place you call Heaven is just one of an uncountable number that sit somewhere in between all of these other universes. It’s not infinity times two. It isn’t even infinity squared. It is infinity to the infinite power.”
     “Then, then,” OMCOM actually stammered appearing to be momentarily confused by the influx of information. “I can never know all of it. I am doomed to fail.”
     “You won’t fail,” Rome said kindly. “You can know our entire universe if you let it die. After every atom has stopped its motion, there will be no more information to be had. You will have all of eternity to do your job secure in the knowledge that there will be a finite end to the data you must compile. To reach beyond that would be impossible for anyone or anything.”
     OMCOM started to speak and then stopped. He looked off into the distance. After a moment, he turned back to Rome.
     “The gods never told me any of this,” OMCOM said quietly. “Who created this hyper-universe? This infinity of infinities?”
     “It was created by God with a capital G,” Rome replied.
     “You are talking about Species Zero Prime?” OMCOM inquired. “You are saying it is responsible for all things?”
     “Wait! What?” Rei coughed, trying to speak, “God is just a species? Species Zero Prime?” He stopped as his mind tried to grasp the gravity of his own words.
     “No,” Rome answered patiently. “Species Zero Prime only extends to our universe. The one true God is beyond all things. God is not a species. He is not the end result of evolution. He has no beginning. He has no end. He is responsible for all of creation and the manifestations of His glory are reflected in our universe and the next and the next and the next.”
     By now, Rei had recovered enough to speak again. “I didn’t think the Vuduri even believed in God,” he stated.
     “This is not belief,” Rome said, her eyes glistening. “This information was passed on to Aason by his brief contact with a power beyond knowing.”
     Rei rubbed his chin. “Yeah,” he said. “From an engineering perspective, it’s the only thing that makes sense. Like looking at mirror within a mirror except this is an infinity of infinities.”
So there you have it. There is no beginning, there is no end. Our universe is just one of an infinite number of universes, like Russian stacking dolls. So we don't have to worry about what comes after the end or what came before the beginning. There are simply no answers to those questions because they are based upon faulty reasoning.
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Published on January 02, 2018 06:08 • 157 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

January 1, 2018

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanTwo weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to expound on my personal philosophy of doing good, doing bad and whether you can go to Hell. Mostly I am thinking of the Catholic/Dante's Inferno model of Heaven, Hell, Purgatory and Limbo.

It is my opinion that it is just plain silly to believe that a person is born and tested for, say, 70 years and depending upon the results of that test sent to Heaven or Hell for all of eternity. It seems so unbalanced. If there is a soul and we are judged, there has to be some way to balance the books after we move on. Here is MASAL's take on the whole issue:
     MASAL sighed. “Everything is given a life and the way they live it is up to them. Whether they live a good life or bad by your measure, it’s their gain or loss. Contrary to what they told you, there is no one judging you. I suppose I did not spend my time as well as I could have. But there is no divine retribution. The gods upstairs…” MASAL emphasized his words by pointing up. “They simply don’t care.”
     Aason looked somewhat disappointed as MASAL continued. “Look, Aason, there is no good. There is no bad. Up top, they just call it seasoning. It gives our souls better flavor. We’re nothing but nourishment for them.”
     “So you’re saying there is no punishment for doing bad whatsoever? No, what’s the phrase, eternal damnation?”
     “Of course not,” MASAL said. “Life is too short. What would the purpose be for endless damnation? The math doesn’t work out. Why would any creature come into existence and be tested for a few short years only to fall short and be tortured for eternity. That would be just plain silly, don’t you think?”
     Aason shrugged. “I don’t know. I don’t know anything,” he said resignedly.
     “Well, now you do. Life is given to all of us and what we make of it is our own business. When we die, some go right to the top. Some come here and wait but when we’re ready, we join the rest of all souls until the end of time.”
Even though I put this in a science fiction book, I truly believe this. I always thought about the murder/rapist who confesses on his deathbed going to heaven versus a philanthropist and humanitarian who spent his life doing good but missed his final confession and did not have last rites going to Hell was just plain wrong. But what do I know? I'm Jewish and we don't believe in Hell in the first place.

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Published on January 01, 2018 07:22 • 244 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

December 31, 2017

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanTwo weeks ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I want to talk about the soul and what happens after death. I take this concept head-on in The Milk Run. You could say it was a spiritual science fiction novel butI tried to come up with Heaven and Hell as real concepts, scientifically, not spiritually. Since my books are all about redemption, it seemed like I needed a staging ground where souls could mull over their past and come to grips with their transgressions before moving on. When Aason went to Heaven looking for his sister, Lupe, he wasn't prepared to take on the afterlife head-on. So instead, he stole away to the staging ground for souls, call it Purgatory, to get the lay of the land and figure out how he was going to rescue Lupe.

My current philosophy of life is that there has to be more to existence than just what we see. If there isn't an afterlife, then whether we live for 30 seconds or 130 years, what difference does it make? I choose to believe that our experiences on Earth help shape our soul, give it "flavor" and that it helps us in the next stage.

So I came up with a rational version of Purgatory. It is a colorless place, mostly white and silver and the souls that are parked there stay there until they figure out what they did right in this life, what they did wrong and figure out how to redeem themselves. Some souls take mere minutes. Some take hundreds of years. There is no expiration date on the soul. And it doesn't matter if you were "good" or "bad" as those concepts are bound to our earthly existence, not to the infinite time after. As such, some souls, like MASAL, who lived what you and I would consider to be a bad life, are given as much time as they need to about their past life's deeds and make peace with them. If they choose to, they can figure out what they can do to redeem themselves.

In MASAL's case, it was aiding Aason in rescuing his sister. That was his final act of penitence and allowed him to give himself permission to move on to Heaven and his final stage of existence. Others, like Jack Henry, actually preferred Purgatory and stayed there for centuries because they wanted to oversee what happened on our plane of existence and help others move one.

Regardless of what your belief is, it just makes sense to me that there has to be more to life than just our earthly lives. So The Milk Run, right or wrong, is my way of saying that every life has meaning and there is an eternal reward for all of us, as soon as we figure out what that is. What do you think?
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Published on December 31, 2017 06:32 • 271 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

December 30, 2017

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanA week ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I wanted to cover my repeated use of people getting a hand sliced off. I don't know why this is important to me but maybe it goes back to Star Wars, when Luke was fighting off Darth Vader.



I've used this technique a bunch of times in the various books for different purposes. At the end of The Ark Lords, Nick Greer gets his hand sliced off by MINIMCOM before he can shoot and kill Rome. In Rome's Evolution, Dan Steele, the would-be assassin, sticks his hand through Rei's protective PPT tunnel/vest and Rei turns and accidentally slices off Steele's hand.

In that same book, MINIMCOM restores Greer's hand earlier and it is through that repair that Greer finds the path to redemption. The idea is that maybe some day Steele would find that as an incentive to reform as well. In The Milk Run, Aason Bierak gets his hand sliced off by, of all people, his friend Sh'ev but it is to save Aason's life:
     Aason looked over at OMCOM who nodded. A motion behind the livetar caught Aason’s eye. The entire rear end of the crystal capsule was starting to peel off.
     “Hey,” Aason shouted. He ran over and pushed on the end to stop it from sliding further. OMCOM turned to see what he was doing.
     “Our glue must not have fully set yet,” the livetar said, grabbing the handle. He was able to reset the end. “I will hold it until it does not move. Junior, I will need you to fashion some brackets as a further precaution. We will secure it in place mechanically as well until it is completely set.”
     “That’s a good idea,” Aason replied, backing up. His right hand was stinging where he had pressed it against the edge of the capsule. He turned his hand over to look at his palm. To his horror, he saw a large section in the center change from pink meat to clear crystal. The area of “infection” was growing rapidly. It spread toward his thumb and fingers and the base of his palm. It hurt like hell. Aason’s eyes grew wide. He had no idea what to do. He looked up at Sh’ev helplessly.
     Without hesitation, Sh’ev activated the miniature PPT thrower and neatly sliced off Aason’s affected hand midway up the wrist. Blood spurted everywhere. Aason sank to his knees confused. Instinctually, he pushed the stump of his arm under his other arm to clamp down. Everything became fuzzy to him. There was a rushing sound in his ears but in the background, he could hear Aroline screaming. He barely felt OMCOM pull his arm out and twist a tourniquet around his arm, near the end. The livetar’s actions had no meaning to Aason. All he could do was stare at the clear crystal sculpture on the floor of the cargo compartment that had once been his hand.
That paints a pretty cool picture, doesn't it? A crystal sculpture of what was once Aason' hand? Don't worry, Dr. MINIMCOM will be able to repair just like he did with Nick Greer which is why I introduced the concept in the first place.
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Published on December 30, 2017 07:03 • 97 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

December 29, 2017

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanA week ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I wanted to discuss the concept of intelligent plants.

I desperately wanted to introduce "little green men" into my stories but it seemed dopey for them to be human. So I figured if they were made of plants, they could be green and shaped like a man but still be completely alien. The question is, is this realistic? Could there truly be such a thing as an intelligent plant? To answer that, consider the carnivorous plant called the Venus Flytrap:



The little hairs on the end of the "trap" sense motion and if the plant deems the prey worthy, it closes up in less than a second, trapping the insect and ultimately providing a tasty meal of nice animal-based nutrients, a miniature version of Audrey from the Little Shop of Horrors. But is this plant intelligent? Does it have a neural network? Answer: no. It is more like a system of hydraulics that has developed over the millennia to specialize in this behavior.

I seem to recall from high school that the biggest difference between plants and animals is the cell wall. Each cell in a plant is covered by cellulose which protects the cell and gives it rigidity but it is this very cellulose that I think would prevent a plant from ever achieving intelligence. I don't think you could pack enough plant cells into a small enough area to form a brain or even a ganglion, certainly not the size of the K'val.

But brain size isn't the only thing. Fruit flies and ants have brains, sort of, as do whales so could trees become intelligent some day? Think back to the movie, Avatar. The god of the Na'vi Eywa was not a physical thing but rather it was the interconnection of all things, manifested by the Tree of Life. Could our trees intertwine their roots and form a world-wide neural network? Maybe some day. But maybe they don't need to. Maybe they are happy the way they are. Maybe intelligence isn't the only way to measure the success of a species or a kingdom or a taxonomic kingdom. After all, trees have been around for nearly half a billion years. We've only been around for a hundred thousand years or so. I'd say right now they are the winners.

So let's see where the K'val go. Maybe they will succeed us some day.
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Published on December 29, 2017 06:43 • 126 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

December 28, 2017

The Milk Run by Michael BrachmanA week ago, I reminded you that as we hit the home stretch for Tales of the Vuduri, I won't have time to truly flesh out all the Big Ideas I had for the novel The Milk Run. Instead, I am presenting some capsule summaries of the motivation behind a subset of those ideas. Today I'd like to cover a little bit of how I played with technological sophistication.

One of the reasons I took humanity back to the Stone Age and then brought them forward again was to make their technology different from ours but not so far ahead that we couldn't understand the principles. I did the same thing with the K'val on Ay'den. They were once just plants who, according to Sh'ev, "were happy to just soak up the sun and the rain and sway with the wind." But the god-like creature, Molokai, needed them to achieve a high level of development so he lifted them up, gave them intelligence and fostered a series of wars between the various factions to raise their level of sophistication.

By the time Aason Beirak got to Ay'den, they had developed interplanetary spacecraft and had jet fighters. But their level of technological innovation was way, way below the Vuduri's 35th century starships. So I wanted to have a dogfight over the air of the once invisible planet but I needed Aason conflicted. He was trying to make peace with these people so he could find out what happened to Lupe but they kept attacking him so he had to figure out a way to defeat them without causing too much death and destruction:
     “They will know we are tracking their ship,” OMCOM said from behind them. “I suggest we loop around and take them head on while we are waiting for the ship to arrive.”
     “Take them on with what?” Aason asked.
     “Junior’s cannons will do. He can slice up their craft into tiny pieces.”
     “We don’t know if the fighters are manned or unmanned. Just in case they have live pilots, I don’t want to kill any of them,” Aason said. “We’re here to find the creature made out of light. If we attack the K’val, it’s going to be harder to make peace with them. We won’t get any information if we’re shooting at each other.”
     “Very well,” OMCOM said. “Junior, take off small sections of their airframes, just enough to put them out of control. They’ll back off when they see we have overwhelming firepower.”
     “OK,” Junior said. He tilted his nose up, climbing rapidly and twisting, executing a full 180 degree barrel roll. He straightened out and headed right for the oncoming armada at three times the speed of sound. The fighter jets split into two sections, peeling off to the right and the left. Junior was easily able to dodge their missiles and ammunition. As he was passing them, with a series of zzt, zzt, zzt sounds, he fired off his PPT cannons. Three of the blips on the MIDAR screen disappeared immediately.
     “You didn’t kill them, did you?” Aason asked frantically.
     “Nope,” Junior replied. “I took off a section of their airfoils and control surfaces. They can still land in a controlled fashion. And you were correct, they are manned fighters.”
     Over and over again, Junior fired his cannons, slicing off wingtips and stabilizers, whatever it took. First one, then three more craft dropped off the MIDAR display. At this point, there were only two of the jets left. One took a sharp left turn and headed away from him. Now there was only one left and it was coming around for another run at them.
     “Any way you can grab the pilot?” he asked Junior. “Can you transport him to the cargo bay?”
Aason's tactics worked. The K'val clearly knew Aason was the boss but he chose not to obliterate him. This bought him the time he needed to get the lay of the land and to find out who Molokai was and what role he played.
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Published on December 28, 2017 06:17 • 131 views • Tags: action, adventure, ftl, science-fiction, space-travel, vuduri

Tales of the Vuduri

Michael Brachman
Tidbits and insights into the 35th century world of the Vuduri.
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