Jaye Frances's Blog

April 5, 2017

They arrive wrapped in welcome sunshine—drifting clouds, soaring kites, and cherry blossoms. All promises of spring. They bring with them a sense of growth and renewal, of rejuvenation and revival, and according to Alfred Lord Tennyson, “thoughts of love.”Spring has traditionally been a time to celebrate our relationships, to rekindle the spark of passion and intimacy. And while the popularized example of an April Love usually focuses on the young and their quest for a new romantic interest, it’s equally important to commemorate the existing relationship we have with our spouse or significant other. For most couples, a good marriage/relationship equates to a great life. (And unfortunately, vice-versa.)In January, I met a wonderful couple who, many years ago, took the rites of spring to heart. They told me a very poignant story about their commitment and devotion to each other, and how every year they celebrate a very personal love ritual. I hope you’ll find their example as inspiring as I did.Married on March 21, 1961, Henry and Alice were both seniors at Arizona State University and just two months away from graduation. That summer, Henry was hired by Mountain Bell, and was looking forward to quick promotions and success in the corporate world. But within eight months, he received his draft notice, and after completing basic training, was assigned to the Campbell base in Heidelberg, Germany. He and Alice decided she would stay in Arizona—close to her parents—and visit Henry as often as possible.Leaving Alice behind was one of the hardest things Henry had ever done, but before he deployed for overseas duty, they celebrated their first anniversary. That night, he took Alice by the hand and repeated their wedding vows, adding that if he could do it over again, he would “marry her in a New York minute.”Two years later, Henry completed his military service and returned to his job at Mountain Bell, working rotating shifts as a central office technician while Alice struggled through her first pregnancy. Money was tight, and she did her best to help out by baking wedding cakes for one of the local reception halls.Through the years, they experienced the predictable and the unforeseen, and yet they never forgot their first anniversary ritual. And although their second anniversary had to be shared by telephone, it was the only one they celebrated apart. Every following March 21st, after Alice had cleared away the dishes and they had opened each other’s card, they took each other’s hand and repeated their vows, words they now knew by heart.This past March, Alice and Henry recited their wedding vows for the 50th time.During our recent visit, I asked them if they would share their secret to a happy marriage. They looked at each other and laughed.“I suppose it’s a lot like a prescription,” Henry began. “It changes for what ails you. Sometimes, it’s an equal dose of tenacity and patience. Other times, it’s simply being there, supporting each other when life throws you a curve ball. If there’s anything we’ve learned about having a successful marriage, it’s simply deciding—each day when you wake up—that there’s no other person you’d rather be with. You commit to each other because you know how important your relationship is, and how much better your life is because of it.”We continued to chat for another hour, with Henry and Alice recalling memories of their first real vacation together, the births of their two children, and the time they were pulling a travel trailer cross-country and Henry drove away from a gas station with Alice still inside the Texaco rest room. (“I really thought she was in the trailer,” he said. “I never saw her get out.”)Although Henry and Alice continued to good-naturedly dismiss the value of any specific advice they might share with other couples, I gained a great deal of insight from our conversation. And so from their stories, memories, and remembrances, here’s what I learned:There are no mind readers. Your spouse needs to know your expectations. When you find yourself upset or unhappy, explain to your mate why some situations and behaviors leave you disappointed, and more important, what could have been done to prevent it. By the same token, listen to your partner when he or she needs the same consideration. Healthy relationships do not spring from movie magic and romance novels.Support your partner with everything you’ve got. Make your spouse’s happiness and well-being a priority. Put them first in your life and see what happens. Build your life together with mutual goals. And if you sense you’re pulling ahead or away, talk about it and if necessary, readjust your priorities. Value each other as you would a priceless work of art—keeping it safe and protected for as long as it is entrusted to you.Don’t let the intensity fade. New relationships are full of highs and lows, but over time, familiarity and the general consistency of life tend to even out our emotions. And while that means the disappointments are generally less devastating, it can also mean the feelings of excitement can become little more than a memory. Don’t take your spouse for granted. Remind yourself of the quality, companionship, and contentment they provide. Try to imagine how much you would miss them—what your life would be like without them.Cultivate common interests. We’ve all heard that opposites attract, but sorry, it just isn’t true. For long-term happiness, it’s important to develop and cultivate common interests. Explore things you like to do together, especially if it means learning a new skill or activity that both can participate in.It’s the little things. When Henry and Alice described the best parts of their lives, they never mentioned the new car they were driving or the several homes they had bought and lived in, or even the accomplishments they achieved in their careers. They reminisced about the little things: Sitting together on a porch swing; walking in the rain; holding hands on the beach—the kind of memories that are made by spending simple times together, without worrying about the future or fretting over the past. Strive to find quiet moments that you can share, without the distractions and demands of career and material accomplishments.Until next time,JayeVisit me on:FacebookTwitterAmazonI hope you enjoyed this excerpt from the short story collection,Love Travels ForeverIf you'd like to receive updates and news, justClick Hereto subscribe - thank you for following!
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on April 05, 2017 09:59 • 18 views

February 11, 2017

A Valentine for DannyI’d like to share my favorite Valentine’s story. It’s about a twenty-two-year-old woman named Wanda, and how she helped hundreds of couples celebrate Valentine’s Day—every day of the year.During World War II, Wanda worked at the Fayetteville, North Carolina train station selling tickets, making reservations, and helping passengers locate their luggage.Trains ran full in those days, and getting a ticket without an advance reservation could mean waiting on a hard bench for hours, until the next train traveling in your direction had an empty seat or someone with a reservation didn’t show up.Servicemen on leave seldom had reservations. Traveling on a weekend pass, they took the chance of getting a coveted ticket, hoping to see their family for a day or two before they had to make the trip back. Unfortunately for many soldiers, their passes were spent entirely in the station, sleeping on wooden benches, waiting for a cancellation that never came. And because Fayetteville was home to Fort Bragg, the largest training facility during WWII, many of the boys were only days away from being shipped overseas. Being able to get a seat on the train meant seeing their family, wives, and sweethearts one last time—until the war was over.During the first few weeks at her job, Wanda saw how disappointing it was for soldiers who had to watch train after train leave the station, not knowing if the next one would have an available seat. A service wife herself—her husband stationed overseas—Wanda also knew firsthand how difficult it was for the waiting wives and family watching the trains pull in, praying their loved one was onboard, and hoping they would be able to spend a few precious hours together.One morning, Wanda noticed a soldier standing expectantly to the side of her window. The red stub of numbered paper between his fingers meant he was on the standby list. She also noticed that under his arm were two small tins of candy, both tied with identical red bows. And while the ribbons were a bit worse for wear, it was obvious he was trying to keep them from being crushed.After the next scheduled train pulled out from the station—without him—the soldier stepped up to Wanda’s window and politely asked if there was any chance of getting on the next one. She explained that since projected passenger and seat counts were often in error, the conductor would have to actually check the number of vacant seats after the next train arrived. Until then, she had no way of knowing.He smiled and thanked her, and then stepped off to the side to wait.By the time Wanda was ready for her break, the soldier had moved to one of the benches next to the window overlooking the boarding platform. As she often did, Wanda walked through the waiting room with her cup of tea, checking on passengers and reassuring the wait-listed—especially the soldiers—that she was doing everything she could to get them on the next departure. Occasionally, she would sit down next to one of the servicemen and spend a few minutes chatting, usually about his hometown or his plans for after the war.Wanda told me they were always great stories, but the ones she remembered most were about the sweethearts and wives that were waiting. She said she often imagined her husband telling a very similar story, whenever someone was considerate enough to ask, and kind enough to listen.Since this particular soldier looked as tired as he was anxious, Wanda wasn’t sure he would appreciate her company. But as she walked by, he immediately invited her to sit next to him and finish her tea. After the young man introduced himself, Wanda learned that “Danny” had recently completed basic training and would be shipped overseas in five days. The night before, he had called his girlfriend—Peggy—and asked her to be his wife. If he could manage to get home today, they would have just enough time to find a Justice of the Peace and spend one day together as a married couple before he had to return to his unit.Wanda’s break ended far too soon, and as she shook Danny’s hand, she asked about the two boxes of candy. “One’s for my girl,” he said. “The other one is for my mom.”Wanda silently swore she would get Danny on the next train.She took her position behind the window and her supervisor handed her the stack of banded tickets for the next departure. After carefully counting them, she found there were thirty-one available seats. But the number of reserved passengers, plus those wait-listed with lower numbers than Danny’s, totaled over forty.With as much courage as she could muster, and after turning around to make sure no one was watching, Wanda pulled the bottom ticket from the stack and slipped it under the cash drawer. She knew if she were discovered it would mean her job—a job she couldn’t afford to lose.After waiting for the call to board, she motioned to Danny to come to her window. As she pressed the ticket into his hand, she whispered that a “cancellation” had just opened up a seat, and then shook her head and smiled, a signal that he wasn’t to say anything. He slid a few folded bills across the counter and nodded. Turning to leave, he hesitated long enough to slip one of the boxes of candy into Wanda’s hands. Before she could say anything, he was outside on the platform, and in seconds had disappeared into the nearest passenger car.The date was February 14, 1942.From that day on, Wanda always tried to pull a single ticket from each train’s final seat allocation—not stealing it, but saving it—waiting for the opportunity to place it into the hands of a hopeful soldier.A good day for Wanda was getting one or two servicemen onboard and headed home to their wife or sweetheart. A great day was four or five.I asked Wanda how many boys she was able to put on those trains. She told me she didn’t know for sure, but “it was quite a few.” I estimate that during the two years she worked at the station, it had to be in the hundreds.And yes, Wanda’s husband finally returned from the war. He arrived on one of the very same trains that had carried so many other soldiers home for the weekend—a weekend that never would have happened without Wanda.A Valentine for Dannyis excerpted fromLove Travels Forever, a collection of seventeen short stories on sale right now for $0.99 through February 14 in eBook from Amazon and Barnes&Noble. I hope you'll check it out . . . AmazonBarnes&NobleHappy Valentine's Day!Until next time,JayeFacebookAmazonBarnes&NobleTwitterGoodreadsThe Romance ReviewsIf you'd like to receive updates on events, giveaways, and news  justClick Hereto subscribe - thank you for following!
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on February 11, 2017 14:01 • 24 views

January 21, 2017

Many thanks to Crystal atReading Between the Wines Book Clubfor spotlightingRedemptionthis week along with hosting aGiveaway of the entire "World Without Love" eBook series. Be sure to drop in and browse around this great site and enter for a chance to win the series. Here's a peek at the book excerpt fromRedemptionbeing featured with the Giveaway:“Get a better offer?”Mike was grinning, wondering where I’d been.I didn’t want to lie to him. He’d been the perfect escort all evening, buying me dinner, introducing me to his friends, and never once putting the hard press on me. As far as I could tell, he had few if any expectations—and if he did, he was keeping them well hidden.“I was in the laundry room, f*cking that guy Larson introduced us to.”“Uh-huh. You know, I get that same urge every once in a while. I gotta admit, there’s nothing like getting my rocks off while sitting spread eagle on a front-load Kenmore.”He didn’t believe me! Perfect. Now I had to come up with a story he would believe. “I’m sorry, I’m afraid I haven’t been very good company this evening. I’ve been making regular visits to every bathroom in the house, fighting a queasy stomach. Might’ve been the hollandaise sauce. I know, you warned me. And now, I’m paying for it.”His good-natured teasing turned to concern. “Do want me to take you to your hotel?”“Yeah, probably best. I think I’d feel better if I could lie down.”Taking my arm, he plowed a path through the living room, toward the front door.I felt a little guilty, using him. But I had what I needed. I’d exchanged cell numbers with Tommy, extracting his promise that he would call me when he made his next visit to Hong Kong.Click Herefor the rest of the excerpt fromRedemption.Until next time,JayeFacebookAmazonGoodreadsTwitter
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on January 21, 2017 15:03 • 16 views

January 13, 2017

A hugeThank Youto Sherry Fundin atFundinmentalBook Blog for featuringReunionthis week.  Hope you'll drop by to check out Sherry's review and an excerpt from the story. While you're there, be sure to enter the Giveaway of a kindle version of Book Two in the "World Without Love" erotica suspense-thriller series. JustCLICK HEREto head on over!Until next time,JayeFacebookAmazonTwitterGoodreads
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on January 13, 2017 10:01 • 13 views

January 5, 2017

Pick up your Free kindle eBook ofBetrayed, Book One in the “World Without Love” erotica suspense-thriller series from Amazon on January 5, 6, and 7th only. It’s time to start the journey . . .Jewel has everything going for her—a handsome husband, a promising future, and lots of time to explore an island paradise she now calls home.But when a group of strangers accompanies her husband home for a friendly game of poker, her life quickly becomes a hellish nightmare of deceit and betrayal.Now her very survival depends on entering a world where sex, domination, and money are inseparable, where women must obey all masters, and where every desire has its price.Betrayedcontains mature content and is intended for an 18+ readerCLICK HEREto go to Amazon and download your free copy now!Thank you for your support and I hope you enjoy the series . . .Until next time,JayeFacebookTwitterAmazonGoodreads
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on January 05, 2017 08:46 • 12 views

December 12, 2016

I recently returned from a seven-day working vacation on Celebrity cruise lines. Promoting the “World Without Love” series with book signings on sea days, I really enjoyed meeting so many of the passengers and signing their personal copies.A real bonus of the cruise was the opportunity to visit the three Caribbean ports of San Juan, Puerto Rico, St. Martin, and St. Croix.San Juan was an intriguing blend of old and new, with its cobblestone streets, historical churches, and immense fortresses juxtaposed against towering skyscrapers and 5-star hotels. The eclectic geography of this U.S. possession offers stunning beaches, lush rainforests, and quaint, picturesque farms and ranches. And then there’s the nightlife . . . well, let’s just say the ship stayed in port long enough to ignite the senses and deliver a taste of the hot, steamy side of this very sexy city.Next up was St. Croix, the largest of the U.S. Virgin Islands. This peaceful port reflected a relaxed, laid-back lifestyle along with a touch of Danish architecture, historical churches, and sleepy little towns. Of course, the highlight was a visit to the Captain Morgan rum distillery—not that I know anything about that, or remember much of the details . . .As some of you know, my favorite Caribbean destination is St. Maarten/St. Martin, an island claimed by both France and the Netherlands Antilles. This twin island nation was the third stop on the cruise. A beautiful tropical retreat, both sides of the island offer their own exotic charm, maintaining a friendly co-existence with an open and welcoming attitude to visitors. As soon as we docked, I grabbed a shuttle to Orient Bay and a nude beach on the French side, where I spent a balmy afternoon strolling a gorgeous stretch of warm, sandy shoreline, enjoying the sun and the sea . . .  au naturel, of course. For me, it was the best afternoon of the entire cruise, made even more special by being able to reconnect with my friend, Karine, a delightful and beautiful French gal I met several years ago on a previous trip.Many thanks to Fairvilla for selling my books onboard the ship, and especially Jacques and Tenishia, who were there to represent their wide range of flirty clothing and accessories—along with “World Without Love.” And a big thumbs-up to the Celebrity staff, a shining example of professional, courteous, and friendly service with a smile!Until next time,JayeFacebookTwitter
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on December 12, 2016 18:18 • 22 views

November 26, 2016

Join me today at The Romance Reviews Year End Splash Event and enter to win a free eBook ofBetrayed, Book One in the "World Without Love" series.Check out the link below to The Romance Reviews, and scroll down to the Q&A’s. Look for this question for “Betrayed:”“As Annie prepares the shower, Jewel asks her how long she's been on the slave ship. What is Annie's answer?”Link to The Romance ReviewsThenCLICK HEREand look for the link to an excerpt from the story for the answer.5-star praise for “BETRAYED”"...an edge of the seat read...dark and deceptive...exciting and erotic...""A riveting mix of sex, deception, and pulse-racing plot twists...""...an intense, sensual, and often heart-wrenching tale...""...incredibly hot, sexy, suspenseful and entertaining..."Have fun and good luck. Thank you for joining the party!Until next time,Jaye
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on November 26, 2016 06:44 • 12 views

November 23, 2016

I hope you enjoy this Thanksgiving Day story, "The Angels of Ellis Island," from my short story collection,Love Travels Forever. . .For most of us, Thanksgiving is typically a time to reunite with family and gain a few pounds from over-enjoying a table loaded with the requisite turkey, dressing, and all the trimmings. The day is also a highlight for football fans as well as signaling the traditional start of seasonal parties and marathon shopping sprees.It’s quite a contrast from the holiday’s earliest beginnings in 1621, when the Pilgrims of New England celebrated a day of thanksgiving in gratitude for their good health and harvest, prompted in part by the death of half of the Plymouth colony from starvation and cold during the previous winter.Even in our country’s more recent history, there are examples of Thanksgiving representing more than just the start of the frenzied holiday season—when it signified a defining touchstone in life, an inspirational reminder about those who overcame personal adversity and difficult challenges, and were grateful to have survived.I recently spent some time with a new friend who considers the Thanksgiving of 1907 as one of those historical milestones still celebrated by her family. That year, President Theodore Roosevelt signed a special proclamation urging Americans to observe the day with prayer, his request even more significant because it also marked a year when over a million immigrants passed through the Great Hall at Ellis Island—a time when people from all parts of Europe came looking for a better life and a new beginning in a strange and wonderful country called America.One of those immigrants was a woman named Molly. From her family records, I learned that Molly was a slight woman and about 30 years of age at the time she made the crossing. She had lost her husband to cholera three years prior and, as a widow, she knew the transition to a new life in another country would be difficult. She would have to leave everything behind, sail across the ocean to an unfamiliar city without the promise of a job, a place to stay, or a single friend to help her get settled. And she would have to do it with her seven-year-old son, William.For over two years, she had saved her money—enough to buy third class passage on a steamship. And right up until the day of sailing, her friends tried to talk her out of leaving. “Even the voyage itself will be a challenge,” they told her. Third class passengers (called steerage) were restricted to the bottom decks, where they often spent the majority of the two-week Atlantic crossing in their bunks, seasick and restricted from the open decks and fresh air.But Molly was determined. She wanted to raise William where he would have the opportunity to obtain the education she never received, and to achieve financial independence equal to his efforts. She wasn’t making the trip for herself. She was making the change—the sacrifice—for her son.Like the rest of the steerage passengers, Molly and William boarded the ship and settled into the cramped public accommodations. They shared six bathrooms with eight hundred other people and waited in long lines for a meal of soup and stale bread—with Molly always keeping a watchful eye on William. At night, she told him stories about the school he would attend, the new friends he would soon have, and all the wonderful things they would see and do together in a magical city called New York.She planned to find work in the garment district. She'd been told that laundries and tailors were the best options for immigrants, and with her sewing skills, she hoped to find a job that paid well enough to afford a one-bedroom flat in a boarding house on the lower west side. It was where the poor eked out a living, but it was a start. And that was all Molly wanted—a chance to provide a better life for her son.Molly’s dreams of opportunity and success for William kept her motivated and focused during the difficult trip. However, the future she planned for William was one she would never see. On the sixth day of the crossing, Molly complained of headaches and dizziness. Three days later, she was dead.It’s difficult to imagine the loneliness—the fear—that seven-year-old William was forced to endure. With no family or friends, he found himself abandoned and helpless. During my conversation with his granddaughter, she described it best: “It had to be hell on earth.” Reserved, in this instance, for the innocent.Unfortunately, William’s situation was not the exception. Every year, thousands of orphans were shuttled from Ellis Island to waiting jails, almshouses, and orphanages to suffer an unimaginable childhood. Even as bad as those choices were, the alternatives were worse—living in the slums, on the street, or being turned over to the Children’s Aid Society to be shipped west on the controversial Orphan Train, where both boys and girls were indentured to host families who needed able-bodied laborers, regardless of age.It was a far cry from the dreams Molly had held for her son. But it was William’s probable future.Upon arrival at Ellis Island, William was herded off the ship and moved into the Great Hall. After a quick examination to confirm the absence of cholera or tuberculosis symptoms, he was transferred to the mainland terminal by ferry. Once inside, he was taken to a small room, its only window looking into a dimly lit hallway. Volunteers from the children’s mission usually made their pick-ups in the late afternoon, just in time for William to receive a late supper and a bed assignment.An hour later, William had traded the hard chairs for a place on the floor. Too scared to sleep, but too tired to keep his eyes open, he eventually dozed off, only to be awakened by the surprise of a hand lightly covering his. He looked up to see a young couple bending over him.“My name is Betsy and this is my husband, Benjamin. What’s your name?”William managed to whisper it before making his way to his feet.“I’m going to make dinner in a few hours and I know you must be hungry. Would you like to come home with us?”William barely nodded, but for Betsy and Ben Hansen, it was enough. A few minutes later, they were helping him into Ben’s supply wagon, making sure he saw the small bag of clothing they had retrieved from the terminal—the clothes Molly had packed for her son.Betsy and Ben had found William just minutes before the missionaries arrived. Ben was in the terminal to make a delivery of steam-pipe to one of the ships docked in New York harbor. On that particular day, Betsy had decided to tag along, to have the rare treat of enjoying lunch with her husband. Married for eight years, they lived above the pipe-fitters shop that employed Ben.Betsy and Ben had never considered themselves to be potential adoptive parents, and they certainly weren’t actively looking for a new addition to their family. They were already the proud parents of two girls, Sarah and Opal. But it didn’t matter. They made their decision spontaneously, without planning or concern for the additional burden another child would bring to their already tenuous economic situation, or the effect a new sibling might have on their daughters. They simply knew they couldn’t leave William in that room by himself.That evening, William sat between his new sisters and ate his first Thanksgiving dinner in America. And although the menu was quite different from the traditional fare we enjoy today—a chicken took the place of turkey, and each family member enjoyed half a sweet potato—the table was overflowing with unconditional acceptance. Later that night, William slept on a small couch in the living room. But even in his fragile and confused state of mind, he somehow knew he was safe.It was nearly a year before William made it through an entire day without missing his mother. And it was on that very same day that he called Betsy, "mom." It happened while he was headed out the door on his way to school. Betsy waited until she was sure William was completely down the stairs before she let go of the tears she had been holding back for over ten months. Finally, she knew—William was part of the family.Ben and Betsy Hansen raised two beautiful daughters and one fine son. A son who fought in WWI and was awarded the Citation Star for gallantry in action. A son who married his high school sweetheart and had three children of his own. A son who never forgot his first Thanksgiving in America, when one of the angels of Ellis Island reached down to take his hand and bring him home.According to the national immigration records, over 50,000 orphaned children were received at Ellis Island. It’s unknown how many were “unofficially” adopted, but some estimates put the number at only six to eight percent. There were no lengthy forms to fill out or minimum requirements to meet. Most adoptions were as simple as William’s, done by extending an open hand, literally offering the gift of life to a frightened and lonely child.So this year, as you gather around the table with your family and friends, be thankful for the blessings and fortunate happenstances that give your life meaning and substance. And then offer a special thanks to the thousands of people who, just like Ben and Betsy, perform miraculous acts of kindness and compassion every day, surely earning themselves a place with the angels.Until next time,JayeFacebookTwitterAmazon
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on November 23, 2016 07:26 • 6 views

November 18, 2016

It's official -Redemptionis available now in kindle eBook and paperback on Amazon!Here's a brief synopsis of the story:In this final chapter of "World Without Love," Jewel is rescued from Bangkok’s evil flesh markets by a covert government agency. Haunted by her last memories of Annie, Jewel vows to do whatever it takes to find her friend—hopefully in time to save her from Gregory’s sadistic and murderous intentions. In her new position as an embassy hostess, Jewel forms alliances with political attaches and power brokers, hoping one of them can help her find Annie—still alive.Recognizing Jewel’s special assets, her supervisors offer her more responsibility, releasing her from the constant scrutiny of the all-seeing agency network. Jewel quickly realizes she’s been granted another advantage, one her superiors could not have anticipated: The chance to extract revenge on all those who attempted to destroy her life.But again, the hand fate touches Jewel’s heart, forcing her to choose between the new man in her life and the one who helped her escape a dismal world of enslavement and cruel domination.Here are the links for a "Look Inside"Redemptionon Amazon:Kindle eBookPaperbackAppreciate your support and I hope you enjoy Jewel's Redemption . . .Until next time,Jaye
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on November 18, 2016 15:21 • 26 views

September 28, 2016

Here's an update onRedemption, Book Three in the erotica suspense-thriller series "World Without Love" . . .Jewel’s journey has taken an unusual turn, and because I’ve grown so close to this character, I wanted to take a little extra time to make sure her story was complete and did her justice. (And if you’ve read the first two books, you know this carries a double meaning.)  I can tell you thatRedemptionis a much longer book thanBetrayedorReunion, and there was even some thought about breaking it down into two volumes. I resisted doing that, as I promised my readers the series would be a three book set. And just as important, Jewel is ready to move on to a new chapter in her life. Does that mean a new series? It’s possible. Jewel’s certainly not the same innocent and naïve 23-year-old girl she was when taken from her home in Sri Lanka. I hope readers will agreeRedemptionwas worth the wait when they discover the risks Jewel is willing to take to save Annie, and finally resolve the circumstances of the last two years of her life.For more information on the release date ofRedemption,be sure to check in atwww.JayeFrances.comfor updates and news.In the meantime, you can findBetrayedandReunionat Fairvilla’s Sexy Things at Caliente Resort - personally signed and sealed with a kiss!Until next time,Jaye
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on September 28, 2016 17:52 • 37 views