Anthony Everitt





Anthony Everitt


Born
in The United Kingdom
January 31, 1940

Genre


Anthony Everitt is a British academic. He studied English literature at the University of Cambridge. He publishes regularly in The Guardian and The Financial Times. He worked in literature and visual arts. He was Secretary-General of the Arts Council of Great Britain. He is a visiting professor in the performing and visual arts at Nottingham Trent University. Everitt is a companion of the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts and an Honorary Fellow of the Dartington College of Arts. Everitt has written books about Roman history, amongst which biographies of Augustus, Hadrian and Cicero and a book on The Rise of Rome. He lives in Wivenhoe near Colchester.

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The Rise of Rome The Making of the World's Greatest Empire
Written by Anthony EverittTrade Paperback, 512 pages | Random House Trade Paperbacks | History - Ancient - Rome; Political Science - Government | $17.00 | 978-0-8129-7815-5 (0-8129-7815-3)

From Anthony Everitt, the bestselling author of acclaimed biographies of Cicero, Augustus, and Hadrian, comes a riveting, magisterial account of Rome...

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Published on March 02, 2013 12:16 • 275 views
Average rating: 3.96 · 10,611 ratings · 911 reviews · 11 distinct works · Similar authors
Augustus: The Life of Rome'...

4.01 avg rating — 4,592 ratings — published 2006 — 20 editions
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Cicero: The Life and Times ...

3.96 avg rating — 3,294 ratings — published 2001 — 14 editions
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The Rise of Rome: The Makin...

3.88 avg rating — 1,521 ratings — published 2012 — 18 editions
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Hadrian and the Triumph of ...

3.83 avg rating — 1,051 ratings — published 2009 — 15 editions
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The Rise of Athens: The Sto...

3.71 avg rating — 98 ratings6 editions
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SPQR: A Roman Miscellany

3.51 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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Joining In

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1997
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Europe: United or Divided b...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Abstract Expressionism

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1977 — 4 editions
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Untitled on Alexander the G...

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“Most Romans believed that their system of government was the finest political invention of the human mind. Change was inconceivable. Indeed, the constitution's various parts were so mutually interdependent that reform within the rules was next to impossible. As a result, radicals found that they had little choice other than to set themselves beyond and against the law. This inflexibility had disastrous consequences as it became increasingly clear that the Roman state was incapable of responding adequately to the challenges it faced. Political debate became polarized into bitter conflicts, with radical outsiders trying to press change on conservative insiders who, in the teeth of all the evidence, believed that all was for the best under the best of all possible constitutions (16).”
Anthony Everitt, Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician

“Either the future is subject to chance--in which case nobody, not even a god, can affect it one way or the other--or it is predestined, in which case foreknowledge cannot avert it." --Quintus Tullius Cicero”
Anthony Everitt, Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician

“Father and son had been on poor terms (even Cicero acknowledged this) and it was arranged for the young man to be accused of parricide. This was among the most serious offenses in the charge book and was one of the few crimes to attract the death penalty under Roman law. The method of execution was extremely unpleasant. An ancient legal authority described what took place: “According to the custom of our ancestors it was established that the parricide should be beaten with blood-red rods, sewn in a leather sack together with a dog [an animal despised by Greeks and Romans], a cock [like the parricide devoid of all feelings of affection], a viper [whose mother was supposed to die when it was born], and an ape [a caricature of a man], and the sack thrown into the depths of the sea or a river.”
Anthony Everitt, Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician



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