David T. Mitchell



Average rating: 4.01 · 156 ratings · 9 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
Narrative Prosthesis: Disab...

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3.98 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 2001 — 4 editions
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The Biopolitics of Disabili...

4.41 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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The Body and Physical Diffe...

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3.78 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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The Matter of Disability: M...

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings4 editions
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Corporealities

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
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This Abled Body: Rethinking...

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3.69 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Cultural Locations of Disab...

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4.12 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
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Beyond the Binary: Reconstr...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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Economics of the Undead: Zo...

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3.60 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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More books by David T. Mitchell…
“The challenge of the politics of atypicality becomes particularly pressing within neoliberal biopolitics, particularly in that much of disability’s social oppression is based on medical classifications that overindividuate bodies within categories of pathology while turning labeled subjects into generic representations of their medicalized condition group.”
David T. Mitchell, The Biopolitics of Disability: Neoliberalism, Ablenationalism, and Peripheral Embodiment

“Can we keep ourselves open to the experience of nonnormativity as something other than inferiority, deviancy, and intolerable aberrancy (a mere ableist projection of the pathologizing fantasies of normativity)?”
David T. Mitchell, The Biopolitics of Disability: Neoliberalism, Ablenationalism, and Peripheral Embodiment

“Doing so, however, reinforces a problematic “we” that discounts those with disabilities by suggesting all of us occupy failed embodiments in some way without an ability to attend to crip/queer materiality’s nuances of experience.”
David T. Mitchell, The Biopolitics of Disability: Neoliberalism, Ablenationalism, and Peripheral Embodiment



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