Erika Lee


Born
The United States

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Average rating: 2.83 · 6 ratings · 1 review · 11 distinct works
America for Americans: A Hi...

4.38 avg rating — 165 ratings — published 2019 — 7 editions
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Turn Me On: Erotica For Adu...

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At America's Gates: Chinese...

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America for Americans: A Hi...

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亚裔美国的创生

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Desirable Moans: Erotica fo...

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Getting Lucky: A Collection...

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Spanking Time: Hard and Sex...

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Sweat Dripping Moments: An ...

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Rough Late Night Seductions...

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“On December 22, 1941, both Time and Life magazines ran stories helpfully guiding readers on how to distinguish their new Chinese "friends" from the enemy "Japs." Life's story included photographs. The first featured a Chinese government official smiling humbly at the camera. The other featured a stern-looking General Hideki Tojo, the Japanese prime minister responsible for the attack on Pearl Harbor. Both portraits were covered with handwritten notes identifying defining features and racial rules. The Chinese, for example, had a "parchment yellow complexion," a "higher bridge," a "longer, narrower face," a "scant beard," and "never has rosy cheeks." In contrast, the Japanese had an "earthy yellow complexion," "flatter nose," "sometimes rosy cheeks," "heavy beard," and "broader, shorter face."
Time's description of "how to tell your friends from the Japs" was even more specific. "Virtually all Japanese are short... seldom fat, [and] often dry up and grow lean as they age" whereas the Chinese "often put on weight." Chinese had more "placid, kindly, open" facial expressions, while the Japanese were "more positive, dogmatic, arrogant." Perhaps unsurprisingly, some Chinese Americans sought ways to help white Americans distinguish them from Japanese Americans and wore "I am Chinese" buttons during the war.”
Erika Lee

“Photographer and filmmaker Kip Fulbeck's "Hapa Project" photographed 1,200 self-identifies hapas as a way of promoting awareness and recognition of the growing communities of multiracial Asian Americans living in the United States. Volunteers were photographed and then allowed to identify their ethnicities in their own words rather than choose an identity from the prescribed categories that obscured their rich backgrounds. Tired of answering the question "What are you?," participants gave a range of answers. One young woman wrote: "I am a person of color. I am not half-'white.' I am not half-'Asian.' I am a whole 'other.”
Erika Lee

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Reading with Style: 10.8 License to Write (Cory Day's Task) 252 44 May 28, 2016 02:13PM  
Reading with Style: This topic has been closed to new comments. RwS Completed Tasks Spring 2016 1205 90 May 31, 2016 09:01PM  
The History Book ...: IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT OF 1965 27 318 Apr 28, 2020 12:45PM  
Read Women: Reading Non-fiction 29 158 May 17, 2020 11:58AM  


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