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Emma Larkin

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Emma Larkin



Average rating: 3.95 · 4,264 ratings · 511 reviews · 7 distinct worksSimilar authors
Burmese Days

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3.87 avg rating — 25,388 ratings — published 1934 — 104 editions
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Finding George Orwell in Burma

3.95 avg rating — 3,412 ratings — published 2004 — 24 editions
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Everything Is Broken: A Tal...

3.79 avg rating — 503 ratings — published 2010 — 14 editions
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Comrade Aeon’s Field Guide ...

3.87 avg rating — 77 ratings2 editions
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Izzy's Magical Camogie Adve...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings3 editions
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Still Lifes from a Vanishin...

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4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Twin Power [Working Title]

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Quotes by Emma Larkin  (?)
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“Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull. Nineteen Eighty-Four             MYAUNGMYA”
Emma Larkin, Finding George Orwell in Burma

“By using these informal informers, the MI have become incredibly effective, he said. The reason the system works so well is very simple: it is hard to tell who is an informer and who is not. The”
Emma Larkin, Finding George Orwell in Burma

“had read a description of this ability to act so well in public in Czeslaw Milosz’s book The Captive Mind, in which he describes life in 1950s Poland under the authoritarian influences of Nazism and Stalinism. He writes that in such circumstances people must, of necessity, become actors and actresses. ‘One does not perform on a theatre stage,’ says Milosz, ‘but in the street, office, factory, meeting hall, or even the room one lives in. Such acting is a highly-developed craft that places a premium upon mental alertness. Before it leaves the lips every word must be evaluated as to its consequences. A smile that appears at the wrong moment, a glance that is not all it should be can occasion dangerous suspicions and accusations.”
Emma Larkin, Finding George Orwell in Burma

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