Jennifer Homans



Jennifer Homans is a former professional dancer trained at the North Carolina School of the Arts, the American Ballet Theater School, and the School of American Ballet. She performed with the Chicago Lyric Opera Ballet, the San Francisco Ballet and the Pacific Northwest Ballet. Currently the dance critic for The New Republic, she has also published with The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The New York Review of Books and The Australian. She holds a B.A. from Columbia University and a PhD in Modern European History from New York University. She is presently a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at New York University. "

Average rating: 4.0 · 1,717 ratings · 290 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Apollo's Angels: A History ...

3.97 avg rating — 1,462 ratings — published 2010 — 15 editions
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Os Anjos de Apolo - Uma His...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2010
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When the Facts Change: Essa...

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4.20 avg rating — 271 ratings — published 2015 — 24 editions
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9/11: Ten Years Later

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011
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“In the period from 1945 to 1960, the number of orchestras in the country doubled, book sales rose some 250 percent, and art museums opened in most major cities. Ballet was quick to catch up: between 1958 and 1969 the number of ballet companies nationwide with more than twenty members nearly tripled.”
Jennifer Homans, Apollo's Angels: A History of Ballet

“Louis XIV often appeared as a Roman emperor, adorned with other symbols...
The quality, number, value, and length of fabric, plumes, jewelry, and trains were all calibrated to status.”
Jennifer Homans, Apollo's Angels: A History of Ballet

“It is often said, rather flatly, that Russian ballet was a mix of French, Scandinavian (through the teacher Johansson), and Italian sources—that Russia, through Petipa, absorbed all of these and made them her own. This is certainly true; but what really changed ballet was the way it became entwined with Imperial Russia herself. Serfdom and autocracy, St. Petersburg and the prestige of foreign culture, hierarchy, order, aristocratic ideals and their ongoing tension with more eastern folk forms: all of these things ran into ballet and made it a quintessentially Russian art.”
Jennifer Homans, Apollo's Angels: A History of Ballet



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