Benjamin Ginsberg



Average rating: 3.47 · 880 ratings · 93 reviews · 123 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Fall of the Faculty

3.53 avg rating — 243 ratings — published 2011 — 6 editions
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We the People: An Introduct...

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3.39 avg rating — 296 ratings — published 1997 — 118 editions
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Politics by Other Means: Po...

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3.24 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1990 — 5 editions
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Downsizing Democracy: How A...

3.57 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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The Value of Violence

3.89 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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How the Jews Defeated Hitle...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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The American Lie

4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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Captive Public

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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We the People

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3.75 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2011 — 11 editions
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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2011 — 10 editions
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“Accountability measures allow administrators to require the faculty to “teach to the test,” rather than devise the curriculum according to its own judgment. In this way, college professors can be reduced to the same subordinate status to which elementary and secondary school teachers have already been relegated.”
Benjamin Ginsberg, The Fall of the Faculty: The Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why it Matters

“The Founding and the Constitution WHAT GOVERNMENT DOES AND WHY IT MATTERS The framers of the U.S. Constitution knew why government mattered. In the Constitution’s preamble, the framers tell us that the purposes of government are to promote justice, to maintain peace at home, to defend the nation from foreign foes, to provide for the welfare of the citizenry, and, above all, to secure the “blessings of liberty” for Americans. The remainder of the Constitution spells out a plan for achieving these objectives. This plan includes provisions for the exercise of legislative, executive, and judicial powers and a recipe for the division of powers among the federal government’s branches and between the national and state governments. The framers’ conception of why government matters and how it is to achieve its goals, while often a matter of interpretation and subject to revision, has been America’s political blueprint for more than two centuries. Often, Americans become impatient with aspects of the constitutional system such as the separation of powers, which often seems to be a recipe for inaction and “gridlock” when America’s major institutions of government are controlled by opposing political forces. This has led to bitter fights that sometimes prevent government from delivering important services. In 2011 and again in 2013, the House and Senate could not reach agreement on a budget for the federal government or a formula for funding the public debt. For 16 days in October 2013, the federal government partially shut down; permit offices across the country no longer took in fees, contractors stopped receiving checks, research projects stalled, and some 800,000 federal employees were sent home on unpaid leave—at a cost to the economy of $2–6 billion.1 39”
Benjamin Ginsberg, We the People

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