Jordan Flaherty

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Jordan Flaherty

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September 2016


Jordan Flaherty is an award-winning journalist, producer, and author. He has appeared as a guest on a wide range of television and radio shows, including CNN Morning, Anderson Cooper 360, CNN Headline News, RT America, the Alan Colmes Show on Fox, and News and Notes on NPR. He is the author of the books No More Heroes: Grassroots Responses to the Savior Mentality and Floodlines: Community and Resistance From Katrina to the Jena Six and has produced television documentaries and news reports for Al Jazeera America, Al Jazeera English, teleSUR, The Laura Flanders Show, and Democracy Now.

Jordan’s print journalism has been featured in dozens of publications, from the New York Times and Washington Post to ColorLines and the Village Voice. His art
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Average rating: 4.27 · 273 ratings · 38 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
No More Heroes: Grassroots ...

4.29 avg rating — 111 ratings3 editions
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Floodlines: Community and R...

4.41 avg rating — 87 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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What Lies Beneath: Katrina,...

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3.94 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 2007
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Please Forward: How Bloggin...

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4.73 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
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Harvesting Olives & Removin...

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No More Heroes by Jordan Flaherty
"This was a great read! While I do not agree with all of Flaherty's viewpoints, I found his arguments to be very well-supported and well-written. The book sometimes presents extreme ideas, but I still feel that they are useful and constructively th..." Read more of this review »
More of Jordan's books…
“Housing is a human right. There can be no fairness or justice in a society in which some live in homelessness, or in the shadow of that risk, while others cannot even imagine it.”
Jordan Flaherty, Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six

“Those who have not lived in New Orleans have missed an incredible, glorious, vital city--a place with an energy unlike anywhere else in the world, a majority-African American city where resistance to white supremacy has cultivated and supported a generous, subversive, and unique culture of vivid beauty. From jazz, blues, and and hip-hop to secondlines, Mardi Gras Indians, jazz funerals, and the citywide tradition of red beans and rice on Monday nights, New Orleans is a place of art and music and food and traditions and sexuality and liberation.”
Jordan Flaherty, Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six

“Another site of Leftist struggle [other than Detroit] that has parallels to New Orleans: Palestine. From the central role of displacement to the ways in which culture and community serve as tools of resistance, there are illuminating comparisons to be made between these two otherwise very different places.

In the New Orleans Black community, death is commemorated as a public ritual (it's often an occasion for a street party), and the deceased are often also memorialized on t-shirts featuring their photos embellished with designs that celebrate their lives. Worn by most of the deceased's friends and family, these t-shirts remind me of the martyr posters in Palestine, which also feature a photo and design to memorialize the person who has passed on. In Palestine, the poster's subjects are anyone who has been killed by the occupation, whether a sick child who died at a checkpoint or an armed fighter killed in combat. In New Orleans, anyone with family and friends can be memorialized on a t-shift. But a sad truth of life in poor communities is that too many of those celebrate on t-shirts lost their lives to violence. For both New Orleans and Palestine, outsiders often think that people have become so accustomed to death by violence that it has become trivialized by t-shirts and posters.

While it's true that these traditions wouldn't manifest in these particular ways if either population had more opportunities for long lives and death from natural causes, it's also far from trivial to find ways to celebrate a life. Outsiders tend to demonize those killed--especially the young men--in both cultures as thugs, killers, or terrorists whose lives shouldn't be memorialized in this way, or at all. But the people carrying on these traditions emphasize that every person is a son or daughter of someone, and every death should be mourned, every life celebrated.”
Jordan Flaherty, Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six




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