Judith Herrin


Born
in The United Kingdom
January 01, 1942

Genre


Judith Herrin studied history at the Universities of Cambridge and Birmingham, receiving her doctorate from the latter; she has also worked in Athens, Paris and Munich, and held the post of Stanley J. Seeger Professor in Byzantine History, Princeton University before taking up her appointment as the second Professor of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies at King's. Upon her retirement in 2008 she became a Research Fellow in the Department.

She is best known for her books, The Formation of Christendom (London 1989), Women in Purple (London, 2000), and Byzantium: the Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire (London, 2007); she has also published widely on Byzantine archaeology and other fields. Her current research interests include women in Byzan
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Average rating: 3.89 · 2,305 ratings · 274 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
Byzantium: The Surprising L...

3.88 avg rating — 1,803 ratings — published 2007 — 27 editions
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Ravenna: Capital of Empire,...

3.90 avg rating — 177 ratings6 editions
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Women in Purple: Rulers of ...

3.87 avg rating — 150 ratings — published 2001 — 8 editions
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The Formation of Christendom

4.16 avg rating — 64 ratings — published 1987 — 8 editions
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A Medieval Miscellany

3.95 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Unrivalled Influence: Women...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 2013
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Margins and Metropolis: Aut...

3.85 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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Η άνοδος και η πτώση της Βυ...

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Bisanzio: Storia dell'imper...

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Personification in the Gree...

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More books by Judith Herrin…
“In this sense, Byzantine culture embodies the French historian Fernand Braudel's notion of the longue durée, the long term: that which survives the vicissitudes of changing governments, newfangled fashions or technological improvements, an ongoing inheritance that can both imprison and inspire.”
Judith Herrin, Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire

“In 449 Honoria appealed to none other than Attila the Hun to come and rescue her from Ravenna, sending Hyacinthus, one of her eunuch servants, to him with her request. Because Attila was the most aggressively determined enemy of the Roman empire at that time, her invitation constituted a stupendously treasonable act. And the seriousness of her message was marked by the gift of a ring, which Attila interpreted as a proposal of marriage. If he could marry the imperial princess, sister of the western emperor, she might bring at least half the western provinces as her dowry! The dangers were clear enough to both Theodosius II and Valentinian, who reacted quickly. The eastern emperor recommended that Honoria be dispatched to the Huns straight away, which might have reduced the threat of invasion, but Valentinian had reservations about allowing his sister to marry the ‘scourge of God’, who was known to be polygamous. Instead, he punished his sister by exiling her from the court and executing her eunuch servant and other accomplices. Only Galla Placidia’s interventions and insistence upon the planned marriage to the senator Herculanus, secured Honoria’s restoration. In 452 Herculanus was named consul in Rome, a mark of the emperor’s gratitude for saving Honoria from total disgrace.”
Judith Herrin, Ravenna: Capital of Empire, Crucible of Europe



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