Eugene Thacker



Eugene Thacker, author, philosopher and associate professor of Media Studies and Film at New School for Public Engagement and Liberal Studies at The New School for Social Research, has written several books focusing on nihilism, philosophy and media theory.

Average rating: 3.79 · 2,843 ratings · 293 reviews · 41 distinct worksSimilar authors
In the Dust of This Planet ...

3.70 avg rating — 1,499 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Starry Speculative Corpse (...

3.84 avg rating — 250 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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Tentacles Longer Than Night...

4.05 avg rating — 157 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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Cosmic Pessimism

3.79 avg rating — 145 ratings — published 2015 — 5 editions
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Infinite Resignation: On Pe...

4.22 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2018 — 4 editions
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After Life

3.96 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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Biomedia

3.43 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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The Global Genome: Biotechn...

3.45 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2005 — 4 editions
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An Ideal for Living

3.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2014
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Dark Nights of the Universe

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4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013
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More books by Eugene Thacker…
In the Dust of This Planet Starry Speculative Corpse Tentacles Longer Than Night
(3 books)
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3.75 avg rating — 1,906 ratings

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“We have to entertain the possibility that there is no reason for something existing; or that the split between subject and object is only our name for something equally accidental we call knowledge; or, an even more difficult thought, that while there may be some order to the self and the cosmos, to the microcosm and macrocosm, it is an order that is absolutely indifferent to our existence, and of which we can have only a negative awareness.”
Eugene Thacker, In the Dust of This Planet: Horror of Philosophy vol. 1

“Even though there is something out there that is not the world-for-us, and even though we can name it the world-in-itself, this latter constitutes a horizon for thought, always receding just beyond the bounds of intelligibility.”
Eugene Thacker, In the Dust of This Planet: Horror of Philosophy vol. 1

“In addition to the interpretive frameworks of the mythological (classical-Greek), the theological (Medieval-Christian), and the existential (modern-European), would it be possible to shift our framework to something we can only call cosmological? Could such a cosmological view be understood not simply as the view from inter-stellar space, but as the view of the world-without-us, the Planetary view?”
Eugene Thacker, In the Dust of This Planet: Horror of Philosophy vol. 1



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