David Suchet


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
May 02, 1946

Genre


David Suchet, CBE is an English actor best known known for his work on the stage and British television for which he has earned international praise.

Average rating: 3.89 · 26,530 ratings · 1,510 reviews · 88 distinct worksSimilar authors
Poirot and Me

by
4.12 avg rating — 1,922 ratings — published 2013 — 21 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Questions of Faith

4.08 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 2018 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Behind the Lens: My Life

4.31 avg rating — 58 ratings3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
NIV Bible: the Gospels (Kin...

by
4.73 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
In the Footsteps of St Paul...

by
4.46 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Complete NIV Audio Bible Vo...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Complete NIV Audio Bible Vo...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
St. John's Gospel: New Inte...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1995
Rate this book
Clear rating
davis suchet's questions of...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Agatha Christie's Poirot: C...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by David Suchet…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“This is one of the great charms of Poirot’s investigations, for they reveal a world where manners and morals are quite different from today. There are no overt and unnecessary sex scenes, no alcoholic, haunted detectives in Poirot’s world. He lives in a simpler, some would say more human, era: a lost England, seen through the admiring eyes of this foreigner, this little Belgian detective.”
David Suchet, Poirot and Me

“As I look across at the camera for the final time, I think back to Poirot’s last words to Hastings on Friday. ‘Cher ami,’ I said softly, as he was leaving Poirot to rest. That phrase meant an enormous amount to me, which is why I repeated it after he had shut the door behind him. But my second ‘cher ami’ in that scene was for someone other than Hastings. It was for my dear, dear friend Poirot. I was saying goodbye to him as well, and I felt it with all my heart.”
David Suchet

“I would walk round that beautiful, unspoilt little island, with its population of under a hundred and where there isn’t a single tarmac road, thinking about how he would truly sound. Perhaps the quietness of the island helped me do so. ‘Everybody thinks he’s French,’ I said to myself as I walked across the great stones that littered the beach at Rushy Bay, or stomped over the tussocky grass of Heathy Hill, with its famous dwarf pansies. ‘The only reason people think Poirot is French is because of his accent,’ I muttered. ‘But he’s Belgian, and I know that French-speaking Belgians don’t sound French, not a bit of it.’"

"I also was well aware of Brian Eastman’s advice to me before I left for Bryher: ‘Don’t forget, he may have an accent, but the audience must be able to understand exactly what he’s saying.’ There was my problem in a nutshell."

"To help me, I managed to get hold of a set of Belgian Walloon and French radio recordings from the BBC. Poirot came from Liège in Belgium and would have spoken Belgian French, the language of 30 per cent of the country’s population, rather than Walloon, which is very much closer to the ordinary French language. To these I added recordings of English-language stations broadcasting from Belgium, as well as English-language programmes from Paris. My principal concern was to give my Poirot a voice that would ring true, and which would also be the voice of the man I heard in my head when I read his stories. I listened for hours, and then gradually started mixing Walloon Belgian with French, while at the same time slowly relocating the sound of his voice in my body, moving it from my chest to my head, making it sound a little more high-pitched, and yes, a little more fastidious. After several weeks, I finally began to believe that I’d captured it: this was what Poirot would have sounded like if I’d met him in the flesh. This was how he would have spoken to me – with that characteristic little bow as we shook hands, and that little nod of the head to the left as he removed his perfectly brushed grey Homburg hat. The more I heard his voice in my head, and added to my own list of his personal characteristics, the more determined I became never to compromise in my portrayal of Poirot. ”
David Suchet, Poirot and Me

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
The Perks Of Bein...: 2017 Popsugar Reading Challenge 122 958 Sep 21, 2017 10:37PM  
Game Night: Team 2 108 48 Nov 03, 2018 06:17PM  
The Reading For P...: What's on Your Monthly TBR?-May 2019 54 53 Jun 03, 2019 01:36PM  
Crazy Challenge C...: A-Z Audiobook Narrator Challenge 119 138 Sep 10, 2019 06:58PM  
ALPHABET SOUP REA...: Writer's Author Soup 2019 3 22 Dec 20, 2019 06:26PM  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite David to Goodreads.