Basil Johnston


Born
in Parry Island Indian Reserves, Ontario, Canada
July 13, 1929

Died
September 08, 2015


Basil H. Johnston (born 13 July 1929) is a Canadian writer, storyteller, language teacher and scholar.

For his work in preserving Ojibwa language and culture, he has received the Order of Ontario and Honorary Doctorates from the University of Toronto and Laurentian University. Basil has also received the Aboriginal Achievement Award for Heritage and Spirituality.

(from Wikipedia)

Average rating: 4.13 · 708 ratings · 73 reviews · 28 distinct worksSimilar authors
Manitous: The Spiritual Wor...

4.21 avg rating — 156 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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Ojibway Heritage

4.21 avg rating — 117 ratings — published 1976 — 8 editions
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Indian School Days

3.74 avg rating — 89 ratings — published 1988 — 6 editions
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Ojibway Ceremonies

4.34 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1982 — 6 editions
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Crazy Dave

4.28 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Mermaids and Medicine Women...

4.30 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 1993 — 2 editions
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Ojibway Tales

4.15 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1993
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Moose Meat & Wild Rice

3.90 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 1978 — 5 editions
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Honour Earth Mother

4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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The Bear-Walker: And Other ...

4.08 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1995
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More books by Basil Johnston…
“The hardship in living out the vision comes from human frailty, and want of understanding; not from evil or malice. “Men”
Basil Johnston, Ojibway Heritage

“To resurrect former times and to relive them would end the fulfilment of visions and growth in the new order. “Perhaps”
Basil Johnston, Ojibway Heritage

“Life was an ordeal. For leaders, the whiff of smoke to the north served as a reminder that decisions made in their councils were to be based on the principle “that the well-being of people took precedence over form, custom, and even tradition.” Leaders were to avoid making conditions and matters worse for families and community; and, during the smoking, leaders petitioned Kitche Manitou for wisdom. With wisdom and prudence, decisions made would render life just a little more bearable. Life”
Basil Johnston, Ojibway Heritage

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