H.E. Davey



Average rating: 3.98 · 80 ratings · 5 reviews · 7 distinct works
The Japanese Way of the Art...

4.29 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
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Living the Japanese Arts an...

4.27 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2002
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Japanese Yoga: The Way of D...

3.88 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
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Brush Meditation: A Japanes...

3.33 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1999
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Unlocking the Secrets of Ai...

3.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1997
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The Teachings of Tempu: Pra...

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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The Japanese Way of the Flo...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2000
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“A positive attitude is most easily arrived at through a deliberate and rational analysis of what’s required to manifest unwavering positive thought patterns. First, reflect on the actual, present condition of your mind. In other words, is the mind positive or not? We’ve all met individuals who perceive themselves as positive people but don’t appear as such. Since the mind is both invisible and intangible, it’s therefore easier to see the accurate characteristics of the mind through a person’s words, deeds, and posture.

For example, if we say, “It’s absolutely freezing today! I’ll probably catch a cold before the end of the day!” then our words expose a negative attitude. But if we say, “The temperature is very cold” (a simple statement of fact), then our expressions, and therefore attitude, are not negative. Sustaining an alert state in which self-awareness becomes possible gives us a chance to discover the origins of negativity. In doing so, we also have an opportunity to arrive at a state of positiveness, so that our words and deeds are also positive, making others feel comfortable, cheerful, and inspired.”
H.E. Davey

“Emotional baggage,” which is carried over from the past, colors our perceptions. Likewise, past conclusions and beliefs, based on reasoning that may or may not have been accurate, also tint our perception of reality. Retaining our capacity for reason is common sense, but definite conclusions and beliefs keep us from seeing life as it really is at any given moment.

Emotional reactions can be unreasonable, and reason can be flawed. It’s difficult to have deep confidence in either one, especially when they’re often at war with each other. But the universal mind exists in the instant, in a moment beyond time, and it sees the universe as it literally is. It’s the universe perceiving itself. It is, moreover, something we can have absolute confidence in, and with that confidence, we can maintain a genuinely positive attitude.”
H.E. Davey, Japanese Yoga: The Way of Dynamic Meditation

“A strong life force can be seen in physical vitality, courage, competent judgment, self-mastery, sexual vigor, and the realization of each person’s unique talents and purpose in life. To maintain a powerful life force, forget yourself, forget about living and dying, and bring your full attention into this moment.”
H.E. Davey, Japanese Yoga: The Way of Dynamic Meditation



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