L.D. Inman

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126 books | 222 friends

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Brittany
66 books | 49 friends

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557 books | 19 friends

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314 books | 9 friends

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L.D. Inman

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September 2013


Born and raised in the southern Plains; Midwestern Nice except while on commute. Left-handed when wielding an épée. Frequent sufferer from cat paralysis. Treader of sacred time. Eater of hot cocoa mix straight from the packet.

L.D. Inman is an essayist, lay preacher, habitual lurker on fannish social media, and sometime poet, who answered a stunning variety of reference questions in a long and checkered library career, before going into nonprofit communications and marketing. She lives, works, fences, and serves as cat staff in Kansas City.

Average rating: 5.0 · 2 ratings · 1 review · 1 distinct work
Ryswyck

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings3 editions
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The Love Between Enemies

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Somehow, while I wasn’t looking, I became a Fandom Old. I mean, notwithstanding that the last three years have aged me about ten, somehow all the frivolous jargon of internet fandom when it was new is now, little by little, becoming museum pieces.





One such phrase is “bulletproof kink.” It used to be a catch-all term for any trope that reliably gets the user’s attention, whether it h...

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Published on August 20, 2019 11:13

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A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine
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The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal
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A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine
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The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde
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Zoo City by Lauren Beukes
Zoo City
by Lauren Beukes (Goodreads Author)
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The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers
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Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
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The Outskirter's Secret by Rosemary Kirstein
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Not For Use In Navigation by Iona Datt Sharma
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More of L.D.'s books…
C.S. Lewis
“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
C.S. Lewis

Flannery O'Connor
“There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored. The reader of today looks for this motion, and rightly so, but what he has forgotten is the cost of it. His sense of evil is diluted or lacking altogether, and so he has forgotten the price of restoration. When he reads a novel, he wants either his sense tormented or his spirits raised. He wants to be transported, instantly, either to mock damnation or a mock innocence.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“When a book leaves your hands, it belongs to God. He may use it to save a few souls or to try a few others, but I think that for the writer to worry is to take over God's business.”
Flannery O' Connor

138537 Book Club (aka Bitchin' Book Club) — 6 members — last activity Jun 28, 2014 01:45PM
Fun with Friends! Share diverse reading tastes, choices, and opinions. Discuss Literature, Life, and Deep Thoughts.



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