L.D. Inman

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L.D. Inman

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September 2013


Born and raised in the southern Plains; Midwestern Nice except while on commute. Left-handed when wielding an épée. Frequent sufferer from cat paralysis. Treader of sacred time. Eater of hot cocoa mix straight from the packet.

L.D. Inman is an essayist, lay preacher, habitual lurker on fannish social media, and sometime poet, who answered a stunning variety of reference questions in a long and checkered library career, before going into nonprofit communications and marketing. She lives, works, fences, and serves as cat staff in Kansas City.

Average rating: 5.0 · 5 ratings · 3 reviews · 2 distinct works
Ryswyck (Ryswyck #1)

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings3 editions
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Household Lights (Ryswyck, ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings2 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

200 days later

Once again, it’s September 11th, and the sky is that rich blue defined in its depth by the ecliptic’s changing tilt. This week there are students starting their freshman year in college who were born four years after the terrorist attack of 2001, if you can believe it. My freshman year of college was nearly 30 years ago; I’m very glad to be alive on a beautiful day like this.

I’m also glad to be li

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Published on September 11, 2022 16:42
Ryswyck
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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 5 ratings

L.D.’s Recent Updates

L.D. Inman wants to read
You Don’t Know What War Is by Yeva Skalietska
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The Grief of Stones by Katherine Addison
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Invisible Storm by Jason Kander
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Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis
“Suppose one reads a story of filthy atrocities in the paper. Then suppose that something turns up suggesting that the story might not be quite true, or not quite so bad as it was made out. Is one's first feeling, 'Thank God, even they aren't quite so bad as that,' or is it a feeling of disappointment, and even a determination to cling to the first story for the sheer pleasure of thinking your enemies are as bad as possible? If it is the second then it is, I am afraid, the first step in a process which, if followed to the end, will make us into devils. You see, one is beginning to wish that black was a little blacker. If we give that wish its head, later on we shall wish to see grey as black, and then to see white itself as black. Finally we shall insist on seeing everything -- God and our friends and ourselves included -- as bad, and not be able to stop doing it: we shall be fixed for ever in a universe of pure hatred.”
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C.S. Lewis
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Min Zemerin's Plan by Katherine Addison
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The Grief of Stones by Katherine Addison
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The Witness for the Dead by Katherine Addison
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This is All Creatures Great and Small but with dead people instead of animals -- same peripatetic plot, same tentative romance, same new-to-the-area protagonist. Enjoyed very much.
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When the Tiger Came Down the Mountain by Nghi Vo
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The Chancellor by Kati Marton
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Paladin's Hope by T. Kingfisher
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More of L.D.'s books…
C.S. Lewis
“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
C.S. Lewis

Flannery O'Connor
“There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored. The reader of today looks for this motion, and rightly so, but what he has forgotten is the cost of it. His sense of evil is diluted or lacking altogether, and so he has forgotten the price of restoration. When he reads a novel, he wants either his sense tormented or his spirits raised. He wants to be transported, instantly, either to mock damnation or a mock innocence.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“When a book leaves your hands, it belongs to God. He may use it to save a few souls or to try a few others, but I think that for the writer to worry is to take over God's business.”
Flannery O' Connor

Ursula K. Le Guin
“A writer is a person who cares what words mean, what they say, how they say it. Writers know words are their way towards truth and freedom, and so they use them with care, with thought, with fear, with delight. By using words well they strengthen their souls. Story-tellers and poets spend their lives learning that skill and art of using words well. And their words make the souls of their readers stronger, brighter, deeper.”
Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin
“The trouble is that we have a bad habit, encouraged by pedants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid. Only pain is intellectual, only evil interesting. This is the treason of the artist; a refusal to admit the banality of evil and the terrible boredom of pain.”
Ursula K. LeGuin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

138537 Book Club (aka Bitchin' Book Club) — 6 members — last activity Jun 28, 2014 01:45PM
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