Ashley Hay

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Ashley Hay

Goodreads Author


Born
Australia
Website

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Member Since
August 2013


Ashley Hay’s new novel, A Hundred Small Lessons, was published in Australia, the US and the UK and was shortlisted for categories in the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards.

Set in her new home city of Brisbane, it traces the intertwined lives of two women from different generations through a story of love, and of life. It takes account of what it means to be mother or daughter; father or son and tells a rich and intimate story of how we feel what it is to be human, and how place can transform who we are.

Her previous novel, The Railwayman’s Wife, was published in Australia, the UK, the US, and is heading for translation into Italian, French and Dutch. It won the Colin Roderick Prize (awarded by the Foundation for Australian Literary Studies), a
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Ashley Hay Hello Patricia, and thanks for your message.
The book has just been published in the US and is available there now, if that's where you are.
I hope you …more
Hello Patricia, and thanks for your message.
The book has just been published in the US and is available there now, if that's where you are.
I hope you can track it down soon. And of course, that you enjoy it once you do.
All the best.
Ashley(less)
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More books by Ashley Hay…

Giveaway: A Hundred Small Lessons

The lovely people at Atria Books and Goodreads have 30 copies of the proofs of the imminent American edition of A Hundred Small Lessons to give away.
If you'd like to go into the draw, you can enter between now and September 14.
And thank you!
Follow this link for details http://bit.ly/2uLy0IF
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Published on August 20, 2017 20:41 Tags: a-hundred-small-lessons

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“Such fascinating things, libraries. She closes her eyes. She could
walk inside and step into a murder, a love story, a complete account
of somebody else’s life, or mutiny on the high seas. Such potential;
such adventure—there’s a shimmer of malfeasance in trying other
ways of being.”
Ashley Hay, The Railwayman's Wife

That is marriage, he thought, remaking yourself in someone else’s image. And who knew where the truth of it began or would end?”
Ashley Hay, The Railwayman's Wife

“The oceans and the skies…and the sun coming up each new day. That’s all there is, I think. That’s all that matters to think on.”
Ashley Hay, The Railwayman's Wife

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Topics Mentioning This Author

“The multiplication of technologies in the name of efficiency is actually eradicating free time by making it possible to maximize the time and place for production and minimize the unstructured travel time in between…Too, the rhetoric of efficiency around these technologies suggests that what cannot be quantified cannot be valued-that that vast array of pleasures which fall into the category of doing nothing in particular, of woolgathering, cloud-gazing, wandering, window-shopping, are nothing but voids to be filled by something more definite, more production, or faster-paced…I like walking because it is slow, and I suspect that the mind, like the feet, works at about three miles an hour. If this is so, then modern life is moving faster than the speed of thought or thoughtfulness.”
Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking




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