Diogenes Allen



Average rating: 3.89 · 612 ratings · 66 reviews · 20 distinct worksSimilar authors
Philosophy for Understandin...

3.97 avg rating — 213 ratings — published 1985 — 5 editions
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Theology for a Troubled Bel...

3.70 avg rating — 105 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Spiritual Theology: The The...

3.59 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 1997 — 6 editions
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Primary readings in philoso...

3.65 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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Three Outsiders: Pascal, Ki...

3.87 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1988 — 3 editions
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Christian Belief in a Postm...

4.42 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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Love: Christian Romance, Ma...

4.21 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1987 — 3 editions
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The Path Of Perfect Love

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1992
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Traces of God (25th Anniver...

4.70 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2006
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Temptation: Seabury Classics

4.10 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1986 — 4 editions
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“The story of Adam and Eve, as used by the Eastern church to account for our inherited weakness to withstand temptation as an effect of Adam and Eve's sin, can fruitfully be understood today without a historical Adam and Eve but instead with an evolutionary and social understanding of human beings. In the course of biological and social evolution, any group of creatures capable of any degree of relationship to God that fails to be properly related to God commensurate with their stage of development-any such group will have some
network or other of social relations that are not as God intends. People born into a particular social group inherit that social network and act more or less in accord with it, and so inherit the effects of its sin. By being formed and shaped by the inherited social network, each individual is "weakened" in its ability to wrestle with the temptations to which its ontological nature as finite creature is subject. When a fall occurred, when a prepeople or people did not live up to the intentions of God in their common life commensurate to their stage of development, it was probably not at any one specific time; it may have occurred at different times for different groups until failure to be properly related to God was universal in all societies. But by historic times, human development is at a stage that the story of Adam and Eve is a fitting type or model of our situation in relation to God: human beings seeking to provide for themselves apart from God and God's purposes.
This ancient understanding of original sin and evil seems to me both illuminating and, with the evolutionary understanding that I have added to it, thoroughly defensible. I can easily apply it to myself and also use it to understand other people, as I have done in presenting Pascal's analysis of our condition.
Some theologians are willing to grant that the story of an actual Adam and Eve is not necessary for Christian theology, but they still hold that there had to have been a historical situation of original righteousness or innocence and an actual fall from this state. Otherwise, God, not human beings, would be responsible for our condition, and the goodness of creation would be fatally compromised.' My account does have a temporal dimension.
All of us are born without an awareness of God in our lives. God is near us as our creator, generating us each moment of time; but it is as if God is, so to speak, behind us, and we, by looking only in front of us, do not perceive God in our world at all. So we do not take God into account in our lives. This is when distortion in our hearts, minds, and desires begins to occur. Our de facto personality, with our self at the center of all reality, is innocent when we are an infant but ceases to be innocent as it is reinforced by society's way of life, encouraging us to walk away from God and so into evil. We walk away from God by pursuing earthly goods and in”
Diogenes Allen, Theology for a Troubled Believer: An Introduction to the Christian Faith

“Christians today and for many centuries have assumed that the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis 2-3 is the source of the belief in original sin. Adam”
Diogenes Allen, Theology for a Troubled Believer: An Introduction to the Christian Faith

“to human nature as it was created. So some time after the creation, there must have been a fall. Confirmation for this view was sought in the Scriptures, and some found it in the story of the lustful angels that sexually assaulted mortal women in Genesis 6:1-4. But this interpretation of the origin of sin was largely replaced by finding the fall in the story of Adam and Eve.
According to Williams, the fact that there were two different explanations of the fall in ancient Israel is a confirmation that neither story is the real source or basis of the doctrine ofa fall. Moreover, the interpretation of the two accounts as stories of a fall belongs to popular Jewish religious thought, rather than to the official teachers. According to Williams, the stories are the clothing for the previous”
Diogenes Allen, Theology for a Troubled Believer: An Introduction to the Christian Faith



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