G. Pascal Zachary



Average rating: 4.06 · 831 ratings · 64 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
Show Stopper!: The Breaknec...

4.10 avg rating — 754 ratings — published 1994 — 15 editions
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Endless Frontier: Vannevar ...

3.79 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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The Global Me

3.80 avg rating — 10 ratings2 editions
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The Diversity Advantage: Mu...

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2003
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Showstopper!: The Breakneck...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Hotel Africa: The Politics ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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I guerrieri del software

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Married to Africa: A Love S...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2009
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Visions, Ventures, Escape V...

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3.50 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2017 — 2 editions
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The Rightful Place of Scien...

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3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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“Highly creative people don't necessarily excel in raw brainpower. They are misfits on some level. They tend to question accepted views and to consider contradictory ones.”
G. Pascal Zachary

“Nathan Myrhvold had been a protégé of the celebrated physicist Stephen Hawking before forming a software company in Berkeley, California, with some fellow Princeton University Ph.D’s. What drew Myrhvold, or any physicist, to programming? The outer reaches of science increasingly relied on computers; the days of a genius scribbling formulas on the back of an envelope had almost vanished. Physicists usually saw programming as a means to an end. Myrhvold found that his attachment to software superseded his fascination with physical science. His company gained wide notice when he and his friends wrote a faster, smaller clone of IBM’s TopView graphics program. IBM briefly considered making TopView the software interface—the piece seen by customers—for PCs. Trying to keep pace with IBM, Gates wanted a clone of TopView, so he bought Myrhvold’s company. Since”
G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

“In the early 1960s, IBM attempted to revolutionize the field of software by making it possible to run the same program on any number of computers. IBM proposed a family of machines, covering most of the market and controlled by one operating system. The System/360 line, developed at a cost of five hundred million dollars, was a huge success.”
G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft



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