Bob Blaisdell

Bob Blaisdell


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Bob Blaisdell is a published adapter, author, editor, and an illustrator of children's books and young adult books. He teaches English in Brooklyn at Kingsborough Community College. He is a reviewer for the San Francisco Chronicle and Christian Science Monitor and the editor of more than three dozen anthologies for Dover Publications. Email him at Robert.Blaisdell@Kingsborough.edu

Average rating: 3.99 · 5,294 ratings · 512 reviews · 135 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Communist Manifesto and...

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3.85 avg rating — 322 ratings — published 2003 — 7 editions
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Great Speeches by Native Am...

4.20 avg rating — 193 ratings — published 2000 — 4 editions
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Imagist Poetry: An Anthology

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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The Adventures of Bobby Rac...

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4.02 avg rating — 100 ratings — published 1918 — 2 editions
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Old Granny Fox: In Easy-to-...

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4.26 avg rating — 85 ratings — published 1920 — 2 editions
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow...

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3.61 avg rating — 89 ratings2 editions
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Black Beauty

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3.88 avg rating — 73 ratings
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The Adventures of Pinocchio

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3.52 avg rating — 77 ratings
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Favorite Greek Myths

3.68 avg rating — 134 ratings — published 1995 — 6 editions
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Nonsense Poems

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3.80 avg rating — 54 ratings — published 1991 — 4 editions
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“Death had been more pitiful to them than longer life would have been. It had taken the one in the loyalty of love, and the other in the innocence of faith, from a world which for love has no recompense and for faith no fulfilment.”
Bob Blaisdell, A Dog of Flanders

“Why should you take by force that from us which you can have by love?”
Bob Blaisdell, The Dover Anthology of American Literature, Volume I: From the Origins Through the Civil War

“RED JACKET, SAGOYEWATHA (Seneca) “We like our religion, and do not want another” (May 1811) Red Jacket (c. 1751-1830) addressed Reverend Alexander, from New York City, during a Seneca council at Buffalo Creek. Brother!—We listened to the talk you delivered us from the Council of Black-Coats, in New York. We have fully considered your talk, and the offers you have made us. We now return our answer, which we wish you also to understand. In making up our minds, we have looked back to remember what has been done in our days, and what our fathers have told us was done in old times. Brother!—Great numbers of Black-Coats have been among the Indians. With sweet voices and smiling faces, they offered to teach them the religion of the white people. Our brethren in the East listened to them. They turned from the religion of their fathers, and took up the religion of the white people. What good has it done? Are they more friendly one to another than we are? No, Brother! They are a divided people—we are united. They quarrel about religion—we live in love and friendship. Besides, they drink strong waters. And they have learned how to cheat, and how to practice all the other vices of the white people, without imitating their virtues. Brother!—If you wish us well, keep away; do not disturb us. Brother!—We do not worship the Great Spirit as the white people do, but we believe that the forms of worship are indifferent to the Great Spirit. It is the homage of sincere hearts that pleases him, and we worship him in that manner. According to your religion, we must believe in a Father and Son, or we shall not be happy hereafter. We have always believed in a Father, and we worship him as our old men taught us. Your book says that the Son was sent on Earth by the Father. Did all the people who saw the Son believe him? No! they did not. And if you have read the book, the consequence must be known to you. Brother!—You wish us to change our religion for yours. We like our religion, and do not want another. Our friends here [pointing to Mr. Granger, the Indian Agent, and two other whites] do us great good; they counsel us in trouble; they teach us how to be comfortable at all times. Our friends the Quakers do more. They give us ploughs, and teach us how to use them. They tell us we are accountable beings. But they do not tell us we must change our religion.—we are satisfied with what they do, and with what they say. SOURCE: B.B. Thatcher. Indian Life and Battles. Akron: New Werner Company, 1910. 312—314. Brother!—for these reasons we cannot receive your offers. We have other things to do, and beg you to make your mind easy, without troubling us, lest our heads should be too much loaded, and by and by burst.”
Bob Blaisdell, Great Speeches by Native Americans

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