Frances A. Yates


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
November 28, 1899

Died
September 29, 1981

Genre


Dame Frances Amelia Yates DBE FBA was an English historian who focused on the study of the Renaissance. In an academic capacity, she taught at the Warburg Institute of the University of London for many years, and also wrote a number of seminal books on the subject of esoteric history.

Yates was born to a middle-class family in Portsmouth, and was largely self-educated, before attaining a BA and MA in French at the University College, London. She began to publish her research in scholarly journals and academic books, focusing on 16th century theatre and the life of John Florio. In 1941, she was employed by the Warburg Institute, and began to work on what she termed "Warburgian history", emphasising a pan-European and inter-disciplinary approa
...more

Average rating: 4.21 · 2,515 ratings · 170 reviews · 22 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Art of Memory

4.18 avg rating — 1,172 ratings — published 1966 — 32 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Rosicrucian Enlightenment

4.20 avg rating — 385 ratings — published 1972 — 28 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Occult Philosophy in th...

4.12 avg rating — 375 ratings — published 1979 — 15 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giordano Bruno and the Herm...

4.37 avg rating — 470 ratings — published 1964 — 22 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Theatre Of The World

4.13 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 1969 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Astraea: The Imperial Theme...

4.12 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1975 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Majesty and Magic in Shakes...

3.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1978 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Study Of Love's Labour's ...

4.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Valois Tapestries

3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1975 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
John Florio: The Life Of An...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Frances A. Yates…
“Giordano Bruno was to take the bolder course of maintaining that the magical Egyptian religion of the world was not only the most ancient but also the only true religion, which both Judaism and Christianity had obscured and corrupted.”
Frances A. Yates, Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition

“To return to the general analysis of the Rosicrucian outlook. Magic was a dominating factor, working as a mathematics-mechanics in the lower world, as celestial mathematics in the celestial world, and as angelic conjuration in the supercelestial world. One cannot leave out the angels in this world view, however much it may have been advancing towards the scientific revolution. The religious outlook is bound up with the idea that penetration has been made into higher angelic spheres in which all religions were seen as one; and it is the angels who are believed to illuminate man's intellectual activities.

In the earlier Renaissance, the magi had been careful to use only the forms of magic operating in the elemental or celestial spheres, using talismans and various rituals to draw down favourable influences from the stars. The magic of a bold operator like Dee, aims beyond the stars, aims at doing the supercelestial mathematical magic, the angel-conjuring magic. Dee firmly believed that he had gained contact with good angels from whom he learned advancement in knowledge. This sense of close contact with angels or spiritual beings is the hallmark of the Rosicrucian. It is this which infuses his technology, however practical and successful and entirely rational in its new understanding of mathematical techniques, with an unearthly air, and makes him suspect as possibly in contact, not with angels, but with devils.”
Frances A. Yates, The Rosicrucian Enlightenment

“In the world of Ramon Lull, the brilliant civilisation of the Spanish Moslems, with its mysticism, philosophy, art, and science, was close at hand; the Spanish Jews had intensively developed their philosophy, their science and medicine, and their mysticism, or Cabala. To Lull, the Catholic Christian, occurred the generous idea that an Art, based on principles which all three religious traditions held in common, would serve to bind all three together on a common philosophical, scientific, and mystical basis.”
Frances A. Yates, The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age

Polls

More...

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Anything Goes: Author A-Z challenge 15 36 Dec 21, 2012 01:37PM  
Goodreads Italia: This topic has been closed to new comments. Proposte per il GdL Saggistica di Maggio-Giugno 2015 37 152 Apr 21, 2015 03:42PM  
Catching up on Cl...: Aprilleigh's Challenges 40 115 Jan 01, 2018 03:58PM