Barbara Cohen



Barbara Cohen (1932-1992) was the author of several acclaimed picture books and novels for young readers, including The Carp in the Bathtub, Yussel's Prayer: A Yom Kippur Story, Thank You, Jackie Robinson, and King of the Seventh Grade.

Average rating: 4.2 · 11,183 ratings · 1,183 reviews · 62 distinct worksSimilar authors
Seven Daughters and Seven Sons

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4.22 avg rating — 4,338 ratings — published 1982 — 5 editions
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Molly's Pilgrim

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4.07 avg rating — 900 ratings — published 1983 — 20 editions
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Canterbury Tales

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3.79 avg rating — 314 ratings2 editions
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Unicorns in the Rain

3.89 avg rating — 150 ratings — published 1980 — 3 editions
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Thank You, Jackie Robinson

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3.78 avg rating — 151 ratings — published 1974 — 11 editions
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The Carp in the Bathtub

4.10 avg rating — 114 ratings — published 1972 — 7 editions
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Roses

3.58 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 1984 — 2 editions
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Make a Wish, Molly

3.80 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 1994 — 6 editions
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R, My Name Is Rosie

4.35 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1978 — 3 editions
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The Innkeeper's Daughter

3.39 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1979 — 3 editions
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More books by Barbara Cohen…
Molly's Pilgrim Make a Wish, Molly
(2 books)
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4.05 avg rating — 951 ratings

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“Listen to me, Amin," I said slowly. "Listen to me very carefully. Nothing is the same. Nothing will ever be the same again. There lives on this earth a woman who can be my friend and my lover. Do you understand that? Do you understand what a marvelous thing that is?"

"A friend is a friend," Uthman interrupted, "and a woman is a woman. You can't have them in one person. The whole world knows that."

"If that's what the whole world knows, ...then the whole world is wrong. I believed the whole world, and I lost her.”
Barbara Cohen, Seven Daughters and Seven Sons

“I cried for a little while, taking a kind of melancholy delight in my own tears, and then I fell asleep.”
Barbara Cohen, The Innkeeper's Daughter

“It was the face that disturbed me. The artist had lit it in such a way that it appeared very strong, actually, to my mind, brutal. The nose was long and thin, the full underlip protruberant [sic], and the blue eyes icy cold. There was a great deal of pride in his look - more than pride, arrogance, rather. I wondered if it were only animals he had hunted with that gun.
Yet there was no doubt that the face was well done. The contrast between light and dark was evidence enough of the artist's skill. The man, I thought, must have actually been proud of the insolence and brutality which I saw in his face. Otherwise he would never have let the artist depict so clearly those aspects of his character.”
Barbara Cohen, The Innkeeper's Daughter



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