David Franklin

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David Franklin



Average rating: 3.86 · 686 ratings · 38 reviews · 80 distinct worksSimilar authors
Sea Monkeys & Brine Shrimp:...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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Caravaggio and his Follower...

4.23 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Invisible Learning: The mag...

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Painting in Renaissance Flo...

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Treasures of the Cleveland ...

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Treasures of the National G...

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The CMA Companion: A Guide ...

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The Art of Parmigianino

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Radical Men: Simple Practic...

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365 Violin Lessons: 2008 No...

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More books by David Franklin…
“It turns out that you only need 23 people for it to be more likely to find a shared birthday than not.”
David Franklin, Invisible Learning: The magic behind Dan Levy's legendary Harvard statistics course

“With 80 people, the size of this classroom, the probability that there will be no shared birthdays is so tiny as to be virtually impossible.”
David Franklin, Invisible Learning: The magic behind Dan Levy's legendary Harvard statistics course

“I’d like anyone who was born on March 22nd to stand up.” Two students stand up. They link eyes from across the room, and smile. The room laughs. “Now, anyone born on June 14th.” Another two stand up. The room laughs again. “Now, anyone born on August 2nd.” Two more: the class is laughing at each pair, and re-examining their original takes on how low the probability was likely to be. They are learning through experience about human fallibility with estimating probabilities, and at the same time learning something about their classmates. “How about December 21st?” This time, three students stand up. This gets a big laugh for two reasons: firstly, it is unexpected, and secondly, it helps to ram home the idea that in a class that size (there are about 3,000 pairs in a class of 80), there are likely to be “coincidences” everywhere.”
David Franklin, Invisible Learning: The magic behind Dan Levy's legendary Harvard statistics course



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