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Alexander Hamilton quotes Showing 1-30 of 222

“Men give me credit for some genius. All the genius I have lies in this; when I have a subject in hand, I study it profoundly. Day and night it is before me. My mind becomes pervaded with it. Then the effort that I have made is what people are pleased to call the fruit of genius. It is the fruit of labor and thought.”
Alexander Hamilton
“Those who stand for nothing fall for everything.”
Alexander Hamilton, Writings
“Give all the power to the many, they will oppress the few. Give all the power to the few, they will oppress the many.”
Alexander Hamilton
“The constitution shall never be construed...to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.”
Alexander Hamilton
“A well adjusted person is one who makes the same mistake twice without getting nervous.”
Alexander Hamilton
“The art of reading is to skip judiciously.”
Alexander Hamilton
“I never expect a perfect work from an imperfect man.”
Alexander Hamilton
“A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one.”
Alexander Hamilton
“There are seasons in every country when noise and impudence pass current for worth; and in popular commotions especially, the clamors of interested and factious men are often mistaken for patriotism. ”
Alexander Hamilton
“Safety from external danger is the most powerful director of national conduct. Even the ardent love of liberty will, after a time, give way to its dictates. The violent destruction of life and property incident to war, the continual effort and alarm attendant on a state of continual danger, will compel nations the most attached to liberty to resort for repose and security to institutions which have a tendency to destroy their civil and political rights. To be more safe, they at length become willing to run the risk of being less free.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the Hand of Divinity itself, and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power.”
Alexander Hamilton
“Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of man will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice without constraint.”
Alexander Hamilton
“It has been frequently remarked, that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country to decide, by their conduct and example, the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not, of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend, for their political constitutions, on accident and force.”
Alexander Hamilton, Federalist Papers
“On the other hand, it will be equally forgotten that the vigor of government is essential to the security of liberty; that, in the contemplation of a sound and well-informed judgment, their interest can never be separated; and that a dangerous ambition more often lurks behind the specious mask of zeal for the rights of the people than under the forbidden appearance of zeal for the firmness and efficiency of government. History will teach us that the former has been found a much more certain road to the introduction of despotism than the latter, and that of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people; commencing demagogues, and ending tyrants.

Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“Hard words are very rarely useful. Real firmness is good for every thing. Strut is good for nothing.”
Alexander Hamilton
“I have thought it my duty to exhibit things as they are, not as they ought to be.”
Alexander Hamilton
“When occasions present themselves in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests to withstand the temporary delusion in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection. Instances might be cited in which a conduct of this kind has saved the people from very fatal consequences of their own mistakes, and has procured lasting monuments of their gratitude to the men who had courage and magnanimity enough to serve them at the peril of their displeasure.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“Men are reasoning rather than reasonable animals.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Works Of Alexander Hamilton
“Those then, who resist a confirmation of public order, are the true Artificers of monarchy—not that this is the intention of the generality of them. Yet it would not be difficult to lay the finger upon some of their party who may justly be suspected. When a man unprincipled in private life desperate in his fortune, bold in his temper, possessed of considerable talents, having the advantage of military habits—despotic in his ordinary demeanour—known to have scoffed in private at the principles of liberty—when such a man is seen to mount the hobby horse of popularity—to join in the cry of danger to liberty—to take every opportunity of embarrassing the General Government & bringing it under suspicion—to flatter and fall in with all the non sense of the zealots of the day—It may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he may “ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.”
Alexander Hamilton
“A powerful, victorious ally is yet another name for master.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“Who talks most about freedom and equality? Is it not those who hold the bill of rights in one hand and a whip for affrighted slaves in the other?”
Alexander Hamilton
“For in politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Heresies in either can rarely be cured by persecution.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“If we must have an enemy at the head of government, let it be one whom we can oppose, and for whom we are not responsible.”
Alexander Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton
“Vigor of government is essential to the security of liberty.”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“The republican principle demands that the deliberate sense of
the community should govern the conduct of those to whom they
intrust the management of their affairs; but it does not require
an unqualified complaisance to every sudden breeze of passion
or to every transient impulse which the people may receive from
the arts of men, who flatter their prejudices to betray their
interests.”
Alexander Hamilton
“Here, sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.”
Alexander Hamilton
“The truth unquestionably is, that the only path to a subversion of the republican system of the Country is, by flattering the prejudices of the people, and exciting their jealousies and apprehensions, to throw affairs into confusion, and bring on civil commotion.”
Alexander Hamilton
“It will be of little avail to the people, that the laws are made by men of their own choice, if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood;”
Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
“The inquiry constantly is what will please, not what will benefit the people. In such a government there can be nothing but temporary expedient, fickleness, and folly.”
Alexander Hamilton, Papers of Alexander Hamilton, Index

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