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Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship by Robert C. Martin
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Clean Code Quotes Showing 1-30 of 108
“Truth can only be found in one place: the code.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“It is not enough for code to work.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Indeed, the ratio of time spent reading versus writing is well over 10 to 1. We are constantly reading old code as part of the effort to write new code. ...[Therefore,] making it easy to read makes it easier to write.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“So if you want to go fast, if you want to get done quickly, if you want your code to be easy to write, make it easy to read.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“A long descriptive name is better than a short enigmatic name. A long descriptive name is better than a long descriptive comment.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Clean code is not written by following a set of rules. You don’t become a software craftsman by learning a list of heuristics. Professionalism and craftsmanship come from values that drive disciplines.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“You should name a variable using the same care with which you name a first-born child.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“It is not the language that makes programs appear simple. It is the programmer that make the language appear simple!”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Of course bad code can be cleaned up. But it’s very expensive.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Programmers must avoid leaving false clues that obscure the meaning of code.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“There are two parts to learning craftsmanship: knowledge and work. You must gain the knowledge of principles, patterns, practices, and heuristics that a craftsman knows, and you must also grind that knowledge into your fingers, eyes, and gut by working hard and
practicing.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“You are reading this book for two reasons. First, you are a programmer. Second, you want to be a better programmer. Good. We need better programmers.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Clean code always looks like it was written by someone who cares.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“One difference between a smart programmer and a professional programmer is that
the professional understands that clarity is king. Professionals use their powers for good and write code that others can understand.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Clean code is simple and direct. Clean code reads like well-written prose. Clean code never obscures the designer’s intent but rather is full of crisp abstractions and straightforward lines of control.
- Grady Booch author of Object
Oriented Analysis and Design with
Applications”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“If the discipline of requirements specification has taught us anything, it is that well-specified requirements are as formal as code and can act as executable tests of that code!”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Redundant comments are just places to collect lies and misinformation.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Writing clean code is what you must do in order to call yourself a professional. There is no reasonable excuse for doing anything less than your best.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Code, without tests, is not clean. No matter how elegant it is, no matter how readable and accessible, if it hath not tests, it be unclean. Dave”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Perhaps you thought that “getting it working” was the first order of business for a professional developer. I hope by now, however, that this book has disabused you of that idea. The functionality that you create today has a good chance of changing in the next release, but the readability of your code will have a profound effect on all the changes that will ever be made.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“The problem isn’t the simplicity of the code but the implicity of the code (to coin a phrase): the degree to which the context is not explicit in the code itself.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“SRP is one of the more important concept in OO design. It’s also one of the simpler concepts to understand and adhere to. Yet oddly, SRP is often the most abused class design principle.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“In about 1951, a quality approach called Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) came on the Japanese scene. Its focus is on maintenance rather than on production. One of the major pillars of TPM is the set of so-called 5S principles. 5S is a set of disciplines—and here I use the term “discipline” instructively. These 5S principles are in fact at the foundations of Lean—another buzzword on the Western scene, and an increasingly prominent buzzword in software circles. These principles are not an option. As Uncle Bob relates in his front matter, good software practice requires such discipline: focus, presence of mind, and thinking. It is not always just about doing, about pushing the factory equipment to produce at the optimal velocity. The 5S philosophy comprises these concepts: • Seiri, or organization (think “sort” in English). Knowing where things are—using approaches such as suitable naming—is crucial. You think naming identifiers isn’t important? Read on in the following chapters. • Seiton, or tidiness (think “systematize” in English). There is an old American saying: A place for everything, and everything in its place. A piece of code should be where you expect to find it—and, if not, you should re-factor to get it there. • Seiso, or cleaning (think “shine” in English): Keep the workplace free of hanging wires, grease, scraps, and waste. What do the authors here say about littering your code with comments and commented-out code lines that capture history or wishes for the future? Get rid of them. • Seiketsu, or standardization: The group agrees about how to keep the workplace clean. Do you think this book says anything about having a consistent coding style and set of practices within the group? Where do those standards come from? Read on. • Shutsuke, or discipline (self-discipline). This means having the discipline to follow the practices and to frequently reflect on one’s work and be willing to change.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Who can justify the expense of a six-lane highway through the middle of a small town that anticipates growth? Who would want such a road through their town?”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“You know you are working on clean code when each routine turns out to be pretty much what you expected.” Half”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Every system is built from a domain-specific language designed by the programmers to describe that system. Functions are the verbs of that language, and classes are the nouns.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“A system that is comprehensively tested and passes all of its tests all of the time is a testable system. That’s an obvious statement, but an important one. Systems that aren’t testable aren’t verifiable. Arguably, a system that cannot be verified should never be deployed.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Honesty in small things is not a small thing.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“It is a myth that we can get systems “right the first time.” Instead, we should implement only today’s stories, then refactor and expand the system to implement new stories tomorrow. This is the essence of iterative and incremental agility. Test-driven development, refactoring, and the clean code they produce make this work at the code level.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship
“Objects hide their data behind abstractions and expose functions that operate on that data. Data structure expose their data and have no meaningful functions.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

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