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A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas by Warren Berger
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A More Beautiful Question Quotes Showing 1-30 of 172
“You don’t learn unless you question.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Climb the mountain not to plant your flag, but to embrace the challenge, enjoy the air, and behold the view. Climb it so you can see the world, not so the world can see you.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“The main premise of appreciative inquiry is that positive questions, focusing on strengths and assets, tend to yield more effective results than negative questions focusing on problems or deficits.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“If you dream of something worth doing and then simply go to work on it . . . if you think of, detail by detail, what you have to do next, it is a wonderful dream even if the end is a long way off, for there are about five thousand steps to be taken before we realize it; and start making the first ten, and stay making twenty after, it is amazing how quickly you get through those five thousand steps.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Don’t just teach your children to read. Teach them to question what they read. Teach them to question everything.” After”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“questions challenge authority and disrupt established structures, processes, and systems, forcing people to have to at least think about doing something differently.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” Beginner’s”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Picasso was onto this truth fifty years ago when he commented, “Computers are useless—they only give31 you answers.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“most creative, successful business leaders have tended to be expert questioners. They’re known to question the conventional wisdom of their industry, the fundamental practices of their company, even the validity of their own assumptions.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“What’s required is a willingness to go out into the world with a curious and open mind, to observe closely, and—perhaps most important, according to a number of the questioners I’ve interviewed—to listen.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“I’ve always been very concerned with democracy. If you can’t imagine you could be wrong, what’s the point of democracy? And if you can’t imagine how or why others think differently, then how could you tolerate democracy?”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“when he came home from school, “while other mothers asked their kids ‘Did you learn anything today?’ [my mother ] would say, ‘Izzy, did you ask a good question today?”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“It’s easier to act your way33 into a new way of thinking than to think your way into a new way of acting.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“What if our schools could train students to be better lifelong learners and better adapters to change, by enabling them to be better questioners?”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“you can’t help but feel uncomfortable,” because it becomes clear that fear of failure “keeps us from attempting great things . . . and life gets dull. Amazing things stop happening.” But if you can get past that fear, Dugan said, “Impossible things suddenly become possible.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Death to Core Competency,” suggests that whatever a company’s specialty product or service might be—whatever got you to where you are today—might not be the thing that gets you to the next level.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“As you make those daily choices about what to spend your time on and which possibilities to pursue, the author and consultant John Hagel suggests you ask yourself13 this question: When I look back in five years, which of these options will make the better story? As Hagel points out, “No one ever regrets taking the path that leads to a better story.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“The mind, if preoccupied with a problem or question long enough, will tend to come up with possibilities that might eventually lead to answers, but at this stage are still speculations, untested hypotheses, and early epiphanies. (Epiphanies often are characterized as “Aha! moments,” but that suggests the problem has been solved in a flash. More often, insights arrive as What if moments—bright possibilities that are untested and open to question.)”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“with others.” Bennett culls all of these bits59 and shares the best of them with the people at IDEO, or with a larger audience on his blog, The Curiosity Chronicles. For many of us, the beautiful question that calls to us is some variation of what Bennett is talking about: How do we continually find inspiration so that we can inspire others? That question must be asked and answered fresh, over and over. There is no definitive answer, at least not for the creative individual who wants to keep growing, improving, innovating. To say, I’ve figured it out—this is”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Carlin died in 2008, but his daughter, the comedian and radio host Kelly Carlin,16 feels the vuja de way of looking at the world—of observing mundane, everyday things as if one were witnessing something strange and fascinating—is exactly the way Carlin went through his life and got his material. “When the familiar becomes this sort of alien world and you can see it fresh, then it’s like you’ve gone into a whole other section of the file folder in your brain,” she said. “And now you have access to this other perspective that most people don’t have.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“This works well under most circumstances, but when we wish to move beyond that default setting—to consider new ideas and possibilities, to break from habitual thinking and expand upon our existing knowledge—it helps if we can let go of what we know, just temporarily.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Tim Brown, the chief executive of IDEO, says that when his firm takes on a design challenge of almost any type, it invariably starts by asking How might we? Brown observes that within the phrase, each of those three words plays a role in spurring creative problem solving: “The how part assumes there are solutions out there—it provides creative confidence. Might says we can put ideas out there that might work or might not—either way, it’s okay. And the we part says we’re going to do it together and build on each other’s ideas.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“The most important thing business leaders must do today is to be the ‘chief question-asker’ for their organization,” says the consultant Dev Patnaik of Jump Associates. However, Patnaik adds a cautionary note: “The first thing most leaders need to realize is, they’re really bad at asking questions.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“The maker movement is mostly about building things (whether low-tech or high-tech), as well as creating art and music. But it’s driven by project-based, peer-to-peer learning, which tends to happen as novice “makers”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“The elegant simplicity of Square (and that of Dorsey’s earlier creation, Twitter) is a product of rigorous inquiry: Dorsey maintains that good design is about removing unnecessary features by continually asking, Do we really need this? and What can we take away?”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“To get a picture of what’s going on, Heilman says, start by thinking of the brain as a forest full of trees. “Think of a neuron, or a nerve cell, as one of those trees,” he says. In this analogy, the cell body forms the tree trunk; there are major branches, known as axons, and smaller branches, dendrites, that extend out to the farthest reaches. “In the brain, some of those trees are closer together than others, and the branches communicate with each other.” As this happens, “neural connections” are formed, which can produce new thoughts, ideas, and insights.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“I asked Meier about that second question, and she said it originally popped into her head about forty years ago, when a third-grade student at her Harlem school said to her, “What’s different about this school is you’re interested in what we don’t know, not just what we do know.” Meier was very taken with that comment; it confirmed to her, more than any of the impressive test results her school was achieving, that she was doing what she’d set out to do when she started the Central Park East schools.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“remote associations—“like when we think of ‘table’ and the idea of ‘under the table’”—require more of a neural reach. The brain’s right hemisphere, made up of cells with longer branches, is better suited for this task.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“We arrive at originality because the dendrites have reached out and made contact with the branches of faraway “trees,” thereby enabling us to combine thoughts, bits of knowledge, and influences that normally do not mix.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas
“Just asking Why and What If will not necessarily cause these neural connections to occur—but questioning can help nourish the trees and extend the reach of those branches.”
Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas

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