The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness Quotes

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The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness by Timothy J. Keller
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The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness Quotes (showing 1-30 of 37)
“...the essence of gospel-humility is not thinking more of myself or thinking less of myself, it is thinking of myself less.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness
“C.S. Lewis in Mere Christianity makes a brilliant observation about gospel-humility at the very end of his chapter on pride. If we were to meet a truly humble person, Lewis says, we would never come away from meeting them thinking they were humble. They would not be always telling us they were a nobody (because a person who keeps saying they are a nobody is actually a self-obsessed person). The thing we would remember from meeting a truly gospel-humble person is how much they seemed to be totally interested in us. Because the essence of gospel-humility is not thinking more of myself or thinking less of myself, it is thinking of myself less. Gospel-humility is not needing to think about myself. Not needing to connect things with myself. It is an end to thoughts such as, ‘I’m in this room with these people, does that make me look good? Do I want to be here?’ True gospel-humility means I stop connecting every experience, every conversation, with myself. In fact, I stop thinking about myself. The freedom of self-forgetfulness. The blessed rest that only self-forgetfulness brings.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“the problem with self-esteem – whether it is high or low – is that, every single day, we are in the courtroom.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“You see, the verdict is in. And now I perform on the basis of the verdict. Because He loves me and He accepts me, I do not have to do things just to build up my résumé. I do not have to do things to make me look good. I can do things for the joy of doing them. I can help people to help people – not so I can feel better about myself, not so I can fill up the emptiness.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Do you realize that it is only in the gospel of Jesus Christ that you get the verdict before the performance? The atheist might say that they get their self-image from being a good person. They are a good person and they hope that eventually they will get a verdict that confirms that they are a good person. Performance leads to the verdict. For the Buddhist too, performance leads to the verdict. If you are a Muslim, performance leads to the verdict. All this means that every day, you are in the courtroom, every day you are on trial. That is the problem. But Paul is saying that in Christianity, the verdict leads to performance.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“if you try to put anything in the middle of the place that was originally made for God, it is going to be too small. It is going to rattle around in there.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“the natural condition of the human ego: that it is empty, painful, busy and fragile.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“The thing we would remember from meeting a truly gospel-humble person is how much they seemed to be totally interested in us. Because the essence of gospel-humility is not thinking more of myself or thinking less of myself, it is thinking of myself less.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“low self-esteem and pride are horrible nuisances to our own future and to everyone around us.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Up until the 20th century, traditional cultures (and this is still true of most cultures in the world) always believed that too high a view of yourself was the root cause of all the evil in the world...Our belief today--and it in deeply rooted in everything--is that people misbehave for lack of self-esteem and because they have too low a view of themselves.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness
“Paul is saying that he has reached a place where his ego draws no more attention to itself than any other part of his body. He has reached the place where he is not thinking about himself anymore. When he does something wrong or something good, he does not connect it to himself any more.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“The truly gospel-humble person is a self-forgetful person whose ego is just like his or her toes. It just works. It does not draw attention to itself. The toes just work; the ego just works. Neither draws attention to itself.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“In his book Sickness Unto Death, Søren Kierkegaard says, it is the normal state of the human heart to try to build its identity around something besides God.2 Spiritual pride is the illusion that we are competent to run our own lives, achieve our own sense of self-worth and find a purpose big enough to give us meaning in life without God.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Spiritual pride is the illusion that we are competent to run our own lives, achieve our own sense of self-worth and find a purpose big enough to give us meaning in life without God.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“The thing we would remember from meeting a truly gospel-humble person is how much they seemed to be totally interested in us. Because the essence of gospel-humility is not thinking more of myself or thinking”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Both low self-esteem and pride are horrible nuisances to our own future and to everyone around us.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Pride gets no pleasure out of having something, only out of having more of it than the next person. We say that people are proud of being rich, or clever, or good-looking, but they are not. They are proud of being richer, or cleverer, or better-looking than others. If everyone else became equally rich, or clever, or good-looking there would be nothing to be proud about.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Gospel-humility is not needing to think about myself. Not needing to connect things with myself. It is an end to thoughts such as, ‘I’m in this room with these people, does that make me look good? Do I want to be here?’ True gospel-humility means I stop connecting every experience, every conversation, with myself. In fact, I stop thinking about myself. The freedom of self-forgetfulness. The blessed rest that only self-forgetfulness brings.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“This is gospel-humility, blessed self-forgetfulness. Not thinking less of myself as in modern cultures, or less of myself as in traditional cultures. Simply thinking of myself less.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness
“The way the normal human ego tries to fill its emptiness and deal with its discomfort is by comparing itself to other people. All the time.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“All I can tell you is that we have to re-live the gospel every time we pray. We have to re-live it every time we go to church. We have to re-live the gospel on the spot and ask ourselves what we are doing in the courtroom. We should not be there. The court is adjourned.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“The thing we would remember from meeting a truly gospel-humble person is how much they”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“the essence of gospel-humility is not thinking more of myself or thinking less of myself, it is thinking of myself less.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“A truly gospel-humble person is not a self-hating person or a self-loving person, but a gospel-humble person. The truly gospel-humble person is a self-forgetful person whose ego is just like his or her toes. It just works. It does not draw attention to itself. The toes just work; the ego just works. Neither draws attention to itself. Here is one little test. The self-forgetful person would never be hurt particularly badly by criticism. It would not devastate them, it would not keep them up late, it would not bother them. Why? Because a person who is devastated by criticism is putting too much value on what other people think, on other people’s opinions.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“So Paul does not look to the Corinthians for his identity. He does not go to them for the verdict that he is a ‘somebody’. He does not get that sense of identity from them. But he does not get it from himself either. He knows that trying to find self-esteem by living up to a certain set of standards is a trap.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“Paul is saying that he has reached a place where his ego draws no more attention to itself than any other part of his body. He has reached the place where he is not thinking about himself anymore. When he does something wrong or something good, he does not connect it to himself any more. C.S.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“But Paul is saying that in Christianity, the verdict leads to performance.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“can tell you is that we have to re-live the gospel every time we pray. We have to re-live it every time we go to church. We have to re-live the gospel on the spot and ask ourselves what we are doing in the courtroom. We should not be there. The court is adjourned.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness
“In other words, we are only proud of being more successful, more intelligent or more good-looking than the next person, and we are in the presence of someone who is more successful, intelligent and good-looking than we are, we lose all pleasure in what we had. That is because we really had no pleasure in it. We were proud of it.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness
“Up until the twentieth century, traditional cultures (and this is still true of most cultures in the world) always believed that too high a view of yourself was the root cause of all the evil in the world.”
Timothy J. Keller, The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness

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