What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite Quotes

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What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite by David DiSalvo
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“Loneliness, Cacioppo points out, has nothing to do with how many people are physically around us, but has everything to do with our failure to get what we need from our relationships.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“Since the early days of studying propaganda used during World War II, psychology research has demonstrated that the more a message is repeated, the more likely we are to believe it—particularly if we are paying little attention.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“Since our brains are adept at finding and drawing conclusions from patterns, it's not surprising that coincidences captivate our attention.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“humans are born with brains structured to make sense of the world, and that often leads to beliefs that go beyond any natural explanation.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“When we do a moral act to offset an immoral one, we are engaged in “moral cleansing.” When we do nothing, or perhaps something perceived as immoral (because we feel like we have enough in the moral bank account to get away with it) we are engaged in “moral licensing.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“In one study, participants were primed with high-achievement words (related to winning, excellence, etc.) flashed on a computer screen. Each word appeared only for an instant, too fast for conscious deliberation. Participants with high-achievement motivation performed significantly better on tasks after being primed with the words than those with low achievement motivation.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“The study authors believe that when high achievers are primed to achieve excellence, the idea that a task is “fun” undercuts their desire to excel.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“once we invest trust in a particular source of knowledge, we're less likely to scrutinize information from that source in the future.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“The more focused we are on the message, the less likely we are to be influenced.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“The truth, however, is that statistics lord over our lives every minute of every day. For the purposes of this discussion, suffice to say that all of us are the pawns of probability.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“For certainly, at the level of social life, what is called the adjustment of man to his environment takes place through the medium of fictions.” —WALTER LIPPMAN, PUBLIC OPINION”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“words, for our brains, reality equals relevance.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“The meanings we give to patterns of coincidence originate and live solely in our minds and are then projected into the world.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“This compulsion to connect experiences, symbols, images, and ideas stems directly from the brain's vital function as an organ evolved to make sense of our environment.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“the adaptive capabilities of our brains—like pattern recognition—did not evolve to make sense of complex commercial environments like those we live in.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“your brain is structured to take the path of least resistance, because that's the less threatening way to go—but”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“N-Effect: the effect that occurs when the number of total competitors results in diminished motivation for individual competitors.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“schema (singular form of schemata) is like a mental map of concepts that hangs together by association.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“our brains are happy to fill in the blanks with causal relationships that don't really exist.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“Participants who anticipated more rapid feedback scored the highest on the test.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“motivation to perform well and pessimistic expectations are not mutually exclusive. In fact, they seem to get along famously.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“Preestablished schemata guide our attention to evaluate new information, but they can also guide our attention to selectively ignore information inconsistent with the schemata.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“normative influence (SNI)—versus individuals who are not as easily influenced by others’ opinions (low SNI).”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“those who ask themselves whether they will perform a task generally do better than those who tell themselves that they will.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“homeostasis—defined by renowned physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon as “the property of a system that regulates its internal environment and tends to maintain a stable, constant condition.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“intentional stance: we refer to objects both animate and inanimate as if they have minds as a shortcut to figuring out what is really going on.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“One of the most perilous gene-meme double whammies that humans possess is the notion of certainty. Our natures and our learned biases lead us to believe that we are right whether or not we really are.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“We have to appreciate that our brains weren't born yesterday. We have mechanisms to warn of threats and guard against instability because they have worked for a very long time.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“illusion of control to describe what happens when we place ourselves in the role of agent in a situation that truly lacks one.8 We tend to assume the role when something tragic happens to us or someone we love, and we think “If only I had…then this wouldn't have happened.”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite
“why we repeatedly convince ourselves that we've overcome impulsiveness and can stop avoiding our worst temptations.1 This particular tendency toward self-deception is what psychologists call restraint bias,”
David DiSalvo, What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why You Should Do the Opposite

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